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Littleton Independent: Life Historic Farmhouse Demolition

Historic Littleton farmhouse

By Sonya Ellingboe | 0 comments

An old farmhouse on Littleton’s List of Merit has been green-lighted for demolition.

The white farmhouse at 830 Ridge Road (at South Elati Street) has looked forlorn for some time and the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints just to its west has wanted to buy the property and divide it.

The church needs more parking and it proposes to expand its parking area and resell the remaining large lot as an Estate Residential Zoned property, with the old house and outbuilding cleared away.

In order to accomplish this as quickly as possible, the owner requested that the quasi-judicial Littleton Historic Preservation Board, appointed by the city council, waive the 30-day demolition hold that is applied to buildings on the List of Merit.

The board, after discussion and input from an architect and the owner’s husband, and reading a lengthy inspection report by Duke Properties Inc. of Littleton that established that the property “has significant health and safety issues” and is not habitable, voted unanimously to waive the 30-day hold so demolition can proceed. Several board members expressed regret.

The Burnett house on the southwest corner of Ridge Road and Elati Street in Littleton has been OK’d for speedy demolition. Photo by Courtney Kuhlen | ckuhlen@ourcoloradonews.com

The List of Merit designation is placed on homes and other buildings surveyed in the past and deemed to be of merit historically, but not specifically designated as landmarks. (A list appears on the city website). The designation goes with the property when it is sold.

Known in the documents as the Jerome Burnett House, it was built in 1923, according to county records. Jerome and Teona Burnett were listed in the 1932 city directory and were farmers. It is described as a typical farmhouse structure of its time.

At a later date, Thomas Bradbury owned the house until he built a new home on the site of the present church, according to a later owner, attorney Jerome R. Strickland. Bradbury did a lot of farming work for Lawrence A. Phipps, who owned what is now called the Highlands Ranch Mansion.

The board then talked with Community Development Director Glen Van Nimwegen about proposed amendments to the code as related to the HPB, based on a memo from acting city attorney Kirsten Crawford and comments from the city council. (Council discussed these matters in a Jan. 24, 2012, study session and will continue discussion on March 26 instead of the previously announced March 13).

Continue reading Littleton Independent: Life Historic Farmhouse Demolition

Much of Huffman house to be saved | Cincinnati.com | cincinnati.com

Rather than bulldozing the Huffman home on a 22-acre farm in Fairfield, workers from the nonprofit Building Value will take the house apart from the roof down through the "deconstruction" process, which unlike traditional demolition, keeps most materials out of the landfill.

FAIRFIELD — The Bedford limestone fascia on the front of the Huffman home won’t go into a landfill when the home is torn down.

Neither will the oak floors, appliances, windows or doors on the 63-year-old John Gray Road farmhouse built by the late Harold Huffman for his wife, Anna.

There will be no bulldozers used to demolish the 1,600 square foot home on the 22-acre farm donated by the Huffman estate to Fairfield for use as a park.

Instead, workers from the non-profit Building Value will take the house apart from the roof down through the “deconstruction” process, which unlike traditional demolition, keeps most materials out of the landfill.

Earlier this month a crew came in and began removing items from the inside of the home: cabinets, windows, doors, panels, molding, appliances – even the door knocker engraved with the Huffman name.

Most of the materials are being taken to Building Value’s Spring Grove Avenue store for resale. Proceeds from the store are used to support the paid job training of those learning a trade in the construction, retail and customer service areas.

Other materials – like the limestone – will be reused at the park. The limestone could be used as the base for signs or picnic tables, said Erin Donovan, Fairfield’s planning manager.

Concrete is being taken to ACT – A Cleaner Tomorrow – Recycling. Metal will go to the Rumpke Recycling Center.

“The family heirs asked that if we (didn’t) use the house, they wanted us to reuse or recycle as much as we could,” Donovan said.

Through the deconstruction process 83-85 percent of the house will be reused or recycled, said David Hunt, Building Value’s deconstruction manager.

Reminders of the process are scribbled on the plaster walls throughout the house. “Save oak flooring,’’ reads one message. “Save spindles and rail – last thing,’’ reads another.

“This is a perfect project for deconstruction because of the way it was built,” Hunt said. “You have quality materials from the 1940s that are still good now.”

Now that most of the usable items have been removed from the house, crews will spend the rest of this week and most of next week dismantling the house beginning with the roof, then first story, followed by the walls on the main floor and then the oak floors will be removed.

Besides keeping material out of the landfill, Building Value – part of the Easter Seals’ Work Resource Center – provides on-the-job, paid training.

“I don’t take every job,’’ Hunt said. “I have to look at several factors – whether materials are in good shape, the quality of the training opportunity and whether we can make money by selling what we take out in the store.”

This job, Hunt said, will provide training on removing oak floors, which some crew members have never done before.

Worker Delance Allen, a laid off carpentry journeyman, said he welcomes the experience he is getting from this project.

“You learn a lot from a tear down,’’ Allen said. “Once you take something (apart) it’s easier to put up something because you know all the components and where they go.”

via Much of Huffman house to be saved | Cincinnati.com | cincinnati.com.

Deconstructing Detroit: Can large stock of vacant homes, schools spur a new industry? | MLive.com

As Detroit Mayor Dave Bing continues his aggressive plan to tear down 10,000 blighted homes during his tenure, leaders of a burgeoning industry believe the city has a unique opportunity to create jobs through deconstruction rather than simple demolition.

Deconstruction, as Diane Van Buren of development consultant Zachary and Associates tells MLive.com, is the “opposite of demolition, in that it is the careful removal of materials and then the repurposing of those materials for new use.”

As of late 2009, Detroit was home to more than 33,500 vacant homes, according to a survey conducted by Data Driven Detroit. And while many of those were in good condition, others were awaiting demolition or fire.

“I’m an Indian Village resident, so every day I see these houses burn,” says Van Buren. “It just breaks your heart to think that we lost the house, but we also lost all that material that is now just being shoveled into the landfill as burned embers. All that material could have been reused.”

A group of local architects, planners, engineers, government representatives, construction companies and community development groups are expected to explore the deconstruction industry on Friday during the “Detroit Re-Nailed” symposium at Henry Ford Community College in Dearborn.

The event will feature guest lectures, an industry roundtable lunch, site tours in Midtown and an award ceremony for creative reuse of materials salvaged from a deconstruction project. Registration is limited may close, but the general public is invited to attend a reception Friday evening.

Continue reading Deconstructing Detroit: Can large stock of vacant homes, schools spur a new industry? | MLive.com

Chick-fil-A Receives Chain’s First LEED Gold Certification at Ft. Worth Restaurant – MarketWatch

FORT WORTH, Texas, Feb. 17, 2012 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ — Nearly a year after opening its first restaurant built to the standards of the U.S Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) certification program, Chick-fil-A® is proud to announce that its Montgomery Plaza location received LEED Gold certification.

  

Chick-fil-A at Montgomery Plaza is the first LEED Gold-certified restaurant in Fort Worth. Based on the company’s learning and success at Montgomery Plaza, the company has committed to build four more LEED designed restaurants in 2012.

via Chick-fil-A Receives Chain’s First LEED Gold Certification at Ft. Worth Restaurant – MarketWatch.

Upper East Side/Streetscapes – Confessions of a Preservationist – NYTimes.com

The Sherman Hoyt House on Park Avenue and 79th Street, was built in the Tudor style and had walls of fieldstone. The author recalls being aghast, as a teenager, when the demolition scaffolding went up.

I wish I could say I remember Penn Station, but all I can recollect is walking down some broad stairs to a train to a summer camp where I was being sent against my will. I do, however, have inchoate memories of my mother denouncing its demolition, one of the few opinions about public policy she ever expressed.

But I know that from my midteens I liked old things, the heft of them, the burnished quality, the evident history of an artifact — perhaps I should have grown up to be Ralph Lauren’s window dresser. I am not sure what really tipped me toward architecture instead of vintage polo mallets, but I do remember a sense of indignation maturing during the demolition of four buildings around 1970.

In 1969, the developer Burton Resnick began work on what became the 28-story 900 Park Avenue, at 79th Street, which is easily the sorest thumb on the avenue,  with its dead-modern facade, double the height of the surrounding buildings. It replaced the handsome 1917 mansion by Howells & Stokes for the philanthropist John Sherman Hoyt. The walls were fieldstone, the style Tudor, and enlarged 40 times it would be worthy of Downton Abbey.  I. N. Phelps Stokes wrote the massive six-volume “Iconography of Manhattan Island.”  Ultra-refined, he would have winced at this replacement.

Before the Presbyterian Home for Aged Women on 73rd Street between Madison and Park Avenues, was demolished in the early ’70s, it was a trove of medical oddities for the architectural scavenger.

When I encountered scaffolding and guys with crowbars around the house, I was aghast. Here was a certifiable Neat Old Thing — how could someone tear it down? A mansion, on Park Avenue — what millionaire wouldn’t want to live there? It had seemed so permanent. I was shaken. That the co-op had received a decadelong tax exemption only rubbed salt in the wound.

In the summer of 1970 or 1971 I had an experience that did not involve a landmark-type building, but was formative nonetheless. I lived in a railroad tenement at 81st and Third, and the Kalikow family firm was about to demolish a tenement at 80th and Third. One weekend I got through the demolition fence and went through it, top to bottom, looking for … things. Stuff. Old wall-mounted can openers. Green glass juicers. It was harmless enough — entering, if not breaking — until one leg went full through a rotten section of flooring, and no one was within calling distance. If there had been nails sticking through the joists …

After demolition the developer placed a billboard on the vacant lot, prominently visible to uptown traffic, promising the usual “luxury building.” Over the Fourth of July weekend, I painted my own big sign, “Another Ugly Monster Coming Soon” and hung it in front of the billboard.

Continue reading Upper East Side/Streetscapes – Confessions of a Preservationist – NYTimes.com

Green demolition for All Children’s Hospital | wtsp.com

A machine crushing big chucks of concrete spews out mini mountains of smaller bits ready for resale.

St. Petersburg, Florida — In 1967, the original All Children’s Hospital rose from the ground and now that building is coming down.

But the teardown that began last fall is not so simple. The same facility that saved young lives is actually being saved itself-consider it a giant recycling project.

“The salvage value offsets the cost of demoing the hospital, but we also think it’s the right thing to do,” says All Children’s V.P. of Facilities Tim Strouse about the “green” demolition process.

So on this project, after the contractor Sonny Glasbrenner knocks down walls and fills trucks with debris, the trucks don’t head to the landfill. Instead, they roll into an affiliated company called Greenway Recycling. The goal at this Pinellas business is to get the “all” out of All Children’s.

“We’ve been able to bring everything back here and recover about 80 percent of the material that came out of the demolition,” says Greenway’s Pate Clements.

And salvaging that material is quite the process. Inside a big warehouse, trucks dump items perhaps scraped away from the interior of a building. Then giant machines shake and sift it into various sizes and finally workers alongside a conveyor belt pick out anything that can be recycled. Piles of metal, plastic, paper and wood will eventually be sold.

Outside, mini mountains of concrete from demolished buildings rise from the yard. There machines crush big chunks of concrete into little chunks.

That material is then resold. It’s often used to build roads, like the ongoing improvements to U.S. 19.  So it’s quite possible a family rushing their child to the new All Children’s Hospital could travel on a piece of the old one.

Hospital officials say there are no immediate plans to build on the old hospital’s lot; so for now, once this green demolition is complete, the area will become a green space.

via Green demolition for All Children’s Hospital | wtsp.com.

El Paso Historians and Artists Commemorate ASARCO at El Paso History Museum | KTSM News Channel 9

By Jacqueline Crea – Multimedia Journalist

EL PASO-The push to preserve the Asarco stacks continues and tonight the El Paso museum is hosting an event to honor the rich history of the old smelter plant.

Local photographers will be showcasing their artistic pieces that feature ASARCO before some of the buildings were dismantled and during the deconstruction of the smelter.

Supporters of preserving ASARCO have just 10 months left to find the money needed. Some have found a way to express their love for the century old smoke stacks by documenting the site before the deconstruction began. Those videos, pictures and even a time capsule will be presented tonight at the El Paso museum. Robert Ardavino, a supporter and member of Save The Stacks, looks forward to the event.

“I’m excited about tonight’s event. I think any history that pertains to ASARCO is good to know. I think people will be surprised how much history it has. 100 years is a long time,” said Ardavino. He grew up in El Paso and wants the stacks to be part of the city’s future.

“The more people understand about it and hear about it the better off we’ll be in terms of keeping the stacks,” said Ardavino.

But not everyone feels the same.

“I have no feeling about ASARCO, I just think it should be torn down. The only thing that would concern me is the environmental repercussion that would have. But if other people want it and maybe there’s an opportunity for maybe having it as a landmark, I’d say go for it then,” said Denielle Martinez.

Tonight’s even is about just that. Seeing ASARCO for it’s history and turning it into a landmark.

“Carol Eastman, Jackson Polk, he is showing some video. He has some interesting footage of actually climbing the stack and carol’s images I think she’s been documenting the destruction of the buildings and the property from that point of view it should be really fascinating,” said Ardavino.

via El Paso Historians and Artists Commemorate ASARCO at El Paso History Museum | KTSM News Channel 9.

Giving old concrete buildings new life – Journal of Commerce

The Pacific Palisades twin concrete towers are being refurbished with a new exterior and interior to give the structures, built in the 60s, new life.

Vancouver architect Wing Leung calls it giving old concrete buildings new life.

Others call it renewing or recycling buildings.

While heritage buildings are often recycled, there is an emerging trend to reuse concrete buildings constructed in the 1960s and 70s.

“It will become more and more prominent in the future,” said Leung, who is spearheading the redesign of one of the largest such projects in Vancouver – the Pacific Palisades twin towers.

This trend is one that architects like Leung said he sees catching on as larger cities, such as Vancouver, become more concerned with sustainability and the environmental impact of removing large concrete structures from congested city areas.

It’s just not Vancouver that’s thinking this way.

In Toronto, the Mayor’s Tower Renewal project is a major effort looking at up to 1,000 buildings from that era and attempting to upgrade these older highrise residential concrete structures to become more sustainable.

A 2011 University of Toronto symposium on tower recycling focused on the Mayor’s project and the worldwide impact of this kind of activity.

The Pacific Palisades Hotel twin towers started out as apartments in 1966, but then became a 233-unit hotel and apartment complex.

They were recently acquired by Austeville Properties for conversion back to rental units.

“This is a very enlightened client,” said Leung, adding the work could have been phased in.

But, Austeville decided to strip the exterior and gut the interiors.

“It was also an interesting project,” he said.

Removing some finishes restored the era’s post-modernist design on exterior lower faces.

Continue reading Giving old concrete buildings new life – Journal of Commerce

INTERVIEW: Inhabitat Talks to Housing Reclaimed Author Jessica Kellner About Debt Free Homes | Inhabitat – Green Design Will Save the World

If you’re one of the hardcore DIYers out there looking into building your own home, be sure to pick up Housing Reclaimed: Sustainable Homes for Next to Nothing by Jessica Kellner.

As editor at Natural Home & Garden Magazine, Kellner has come across her fair share of beautiful and sustainable homes and now she expands on how a number of people around the country have built their houses without debt despite the economic hardships of the last few years.

While it may seem daunting to design an energy efficient house, source sustainable and reclaimed materials and finally build it, Kellner provides a slew of tips and ideas on how to tackle this challenge for practically nothing down.

INTERVIEW: Inhabitat Talks to Housing Reclaimed Author Jessica Kellner About Debt Free Homes | Inhabitat – Green Design Will Save the World.

Iron Pipe Shelving Systems for Urban Loft Walls & Corners | Designs & Ideas on Dornob

While they may not work quite as perfectly outside of these idealized environments – chipped-white-paint doors and faded-brick walls – you could imagine these fittings being good fits in minimalist spaces as well.

 

 

Etsy seller stellableu specializes in industrial decor for urban lofts, wrapping and twisting wall-and-corner shelving units in all kinds of creative shapes.

In turn, books take advantage both of existing vertical surfaces and horizontal pieces of solid iron pipe, so keep in mind: you will not be able to set just anything on them, either.

via Iron Pipe Shelving Systems for Urban Loft Walls & Corners | Designs & Ideas on Dornob.

Design*Sponge | Slatted-Wood Construction

I’ve been seeing a lot of slatted wood lately, mostly in large-scale designs like Morgan Satterfield’s lovely front porch screen or this incredible house that popped up on Desire to Inspire yesterday. I’ve never come across slatted wood as wall art, but after seeing this wall map project from Natalie Gluic, I’m thoroughly convinced that this is a great way to showcase the beauty of the slatted-wood construction.

After giving the strips of wood a rich, deep red oak stain, Natalie traced and painted in a graphic map to add an extra layer of interest. I actually love the abstraction of the map design spanned over the slats, and the subdued paint palette gives the piece sophistication. Constructing the slatted wood is relatively straightforward, and from there you have tons of great options for how to customize it for your own walls. I could also see this looking incredible installed on an outdoor wall with some plants tucked in here and there. Thanks so much for sharing, Natalie! — Kate

via Design*Sponge | Your home for all things Design. Home Tours, DIY Project, City Guides, Shopping Guides, Before & Afters and much more.

University offers course in practical dismantling and same-site reuse – SalvoNews.com

Ohio, USA – The Reclaim + Remake course has been developed as a 6-credit eight-week (May 7 – June 30, 2012) design-build course offered by the Summer Institute for Architecture of the NAAB-accredited The Catholic University of America School of Architecture + Planning (CUArch).

The focus of the course is the historic Hopewell Cemetery in Warren Township, Jefferson County, OH. The scope of the project consists of the careful dismantling of the abandoned and historic Hopewell United Methodist Church structure located at this site, and the design and construction of a commemorative and contemplative structure in the same footprint using the recovered materials of the pre-existing structure.

It is expected that (based on final participant numbers), the dismantling phase will take 3-4 weeks and the build phase will take 4-5 weeks. The design process will take place throughout the entire eight weeks. This course is open to non-CUArch students for university-level credit. It is recommended that students be either upper-level undergraduate (Junior or Senior) or graduate-level.

The eight-week course will take place entirely on-site in Ohio. The Hopewell United Methodist Church will provide sleeping space in their facility several hundred yards from the cemetery site. The facility has a commercial kitchen and restroom and shower facilities and a large eating and meeting room. The course will run Mondays-Fridays with weekends available for options for rest, explorations in the region, etc. Students will be able to bring their own vehicles and a group / project vehicle will be on-site for the project. The site is in a rural area approximately 50 miles to the southwest of Pittsburgh, PA and approximately 130 miles east of Columbus, OH. Students will be responsible for their travel to and from the site.

This course is offered through the Summer Institute for Architecture at CUArch. Applications for these programs are due by April 15, 2012.

For any questions about details of the project and the course logistics please feel free to contact: Bradley Guy, (GUY at cua dot edu)

via University offers course in practical dismantling and same-site reuse – SalvoNews.com.

Haribaabu Naatesan’s Mumbai take on VW’s ‘Think Blue’ ad

Maharashtra (inc Bombay), India – Well it’s yellow and decorated with scrap. This art work by Indian artist Haribaabu Naatesan was, he said, inspired by the ‘Think Blue’ ad campaign by Volkswagen. Hari is known for his applique futurist steampunk art using scrap materials, of which plenty can be found in Mumbai, with a corporate twist.

Naatesan’s sees life in stillness and a beginning in every end. In 2009 he quit his full time job as head of graphics for a TV company and opened his own studio. He has now had a dozen exhibitions in India and one in Willesden, London.

Extravagant, exotic and colourful, his works look back to Indian decorative tradition as well as forwards to post-recycling society. He calls his art Mukti (no rebirth) and thinks of it as fossilised. To colour his work he has used leftover toner from laser printers. He takes apart the junk and sorts it into boxes categorised by shape, size and material.

“I am stopping recycling itself by putting these objects into my art,” he said. “By doing so I save electric energy, heat energy, fossil fuels and other energies involved in recycling waste in big or small factories, which leads to global warming.”

Fossilss: Recent Works

What the History of Diocletian’s Palace Can Teach Us About Adaptive Reuse – Design – The Atlantic Cities

How will the city of tomorrow adapt and reuse the city of today? I don’t think we ask that question broadly enough, and our day-to-day, property-specific incrementalism can easily overshoot the greatest lessons from history. A hometown case in point transported me from Seattle to Croatia for inspiration about why we should think beyond limited geographies, time frames and lifetimes when we discuss urban redevelopment options.

Recently, the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Seattle-based Preservation Green Lab made urbanist media headlines (including Emily Badger’s Atlantic Cities story) with a report stating the environmental benefits of green retrofits of historic buildings, as compared to new, state-of-the-art, energy-efficient construction. A local church restored as townhouses joined the list of intriguing Seattle adaptive reuse projects typical of national trends.

Almost simultaneously, Seattle Times columnist Nicole Brodeur described a protest-free goodbye to a neighborhood icon in my Seattle neighborhood. A 112-year-old repair garage and offices (demolished last Friday) will soon become the nostalgically named Pike Station, comprised of new townhouses, complete with a courtyard and intermixed retail.

Read the entire amazing article here via What the History of Diocletian’s Palace Can Teach Us About Adaptive Reuse – Design – The Atlantic Cities.

Syracuse revamps vacant building demolition process : News : CNYcentral.com

Photo

The City of Syracuse is looking at ways to improve the way it handles dangerous vacant buildings.

Ever since he moved into his home on Hatch Street in Syracuse 5 years ago, George Horne says it’s been a constant battle with City Hall over abandoned buildings on his street. “You call city line and you have to make repeated phone calls to get them down here.”, Horne complained.

Recently the front porch on one of the homes collapsed. Though city crews cleared the dangerous debris from the yard the next day, Horne called CNY Central’s Jim Kenyon to look into the way Syracuse handles vacant structures. It turns out, the city is revamping the process according to Neighborhood Development Commissioner Paul Driscoll, “What we’ve instituted lately is a more robust grading system for all these vacant structures.”

Driscoll says inspectors now check all 19-hundred vacant buildings at least once every three weeks. He says each is placed in one of five categories with the worst slated for demolition based on their danger to the public. Driscoll says the five abandoned homes on Hatch Street have been classified as “fair” meaning they’re not yet ready for demolition.

Last year, after Kenyon reported on the vacant home problem in Syracuse, Mayor Stephanie Miner increased the demolition budget to $1 million. Driscoll says he’s lobbying for another million for next year. The average cost to tear down a building is around $20 thousand, according to Driscoll. He says the city has stepped up its negotiations with insurance companies and property owners to reimburse the city for demolition costs. “Unfortunately that’s fairly rare to be reimbursed through an insurance company. ” he said.

The Nieghborhood Development Commissioner says he’s restructuring the bidding process by which the city hires a contractor to take down a building to, among other things, allow for deconstruction. “Deconstruction is a method of taking apart a house and reusing many of the components. It’s much more labor intensive but it’s also greener and provides more job opportunities.” Driscoll claims.

Driscoll is also proposing to use part of the city’s demolition budget to target specific neighborhoods where abandoned houses threaten to bring down property values for everyone.

He’s is considering a plan by which a building can be moved higher on the demolition priority list if a neighbor offers to buy the empty lot. He says that will remove the taxpayer expense of having to maintain the lot.

via Syracuse revamps vacant building demolition process : News : CNYcentral.com.

Superuse.org: Where recycling meets design | Cartire Pitched Roof

Cartire Pitched Roof

Cartire Pitched Roof

Photo by Jennifer Loring:

“It’s my friend’s roof and I think it was already there when he bought the house… Love the idea & the durability factor. If I ever have to roof a house, I would seriously consider using tires.”

via recyclart.orghttp://www.flickr.com/photos/jenniferloring/2653532248/

via Superuse.org: Where recycling meets design | Cartire Pitched Roof.

Students’ architecture projects aim for ‘adaptive reuse’ – Corning, NY – The Corning Leader

Corning, N.Y. —

The architectural practice known as adaptive reuse has many benefits.

Not only does it preserve historic landmarks, but it reduces the need for new buildings, saving materials and cutting down on urban sprawl. And it has helped to revitalize downtowns, such as Corning’s Market Street.

Over the past few months, students from six area middle schools have been learning

about adaptive reuse through the Architectural Awareness Program, a joint effort between the schools, the Career Development Council, the American Institute of Architects and Corning Inc.

The students picked old buildings somewhere in their community, visited the sites, then worked with a teacher and a local architect to come up with ideas for transforming the buildings to suit a new purpose.

Continue reading Students’ architecture projects aim for ‘adaptive reuse’ – Corning, NY – The Corning Leader

Six Greater Kansas City Area Organizations to Provide Green Jobs Training – Kansas City, Missouri News

MCC will train up to 35 individual contractors/laborers in abatement and deconstruction and offer small business development training to 12 new and small businesses. The program will implement an On-the-Job Training program to place up to 32 residents trained in abatement and deconstruction into jobs with contractors for the KCMOPD East Patrol Division and Regional Crime Lab’s $57 million development project on a 20-acre campus between 26th–27th Streets and Brooklyn–Prospect Avenues.

Sixty-six structures, mostly residential, will be demolished and the city hopes to employ local companies hiring local residents to abate the properties and deconstruct using principles of materials remediation to reduce the amount of waste deposited in landfills.

via Six Greater Kansas City Area Organizations to Provide Green Jobs Training – Kansas City, Missouri News.

This little piggy built his green – Whidbey News Times

A straw bale community center with a tower stands near Langley. - Contributed photo

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
A straw bale community center with a tower stands near Langley.

It reminds me of the children’s story of the Three Little Pigs. One built a house out of bricks, one built a home out of sticks and one built a house out of straw. If you delve into techniques for green building you find lots of different options, just like they did. But you wonder if the Big Bad Wolf will be able to huff and puff and blow your house down!

A Green Building Seminar is set at Oak Harbor City Hall Tuesday, Feb. 14 at 5:30 p.m. Find out about the latest green building techniques and materials from Dan Neumeyer of Jade Craftsman Builders.

Building with cement, steel and board lumber has a tremendous cost to the planet. Cement, for instance, takes a tremendous amount of energy and pollutes air and water. In some cases, materials are shipped around the world, burning fossil fuels and producing carbon emissions.

In recent years, natural building materials have re-emerged as a local, renewable, inexpensive and sustainable option. Most of what is called “natural building” are techniques that have been used worldwide for centuries. Many of these materials are also energy efficient. And natural materials also make a healthier home.

Continue reading This little piggy built his green – Whidbey News Times

Building a home from spare parts – News – The Moose Jaw Times Herald

Eric Penner de Waal talks about building a home out of 80 per cent recycled materials during the 2012 Green and Sustainable Energy Housing Forum and Fair at SIAST Palliser Campus on Saturday, Feb. 11, 2012.

Eric Penner de Waal talks about building a home out of 80 per cent recycled materials during the 2012 Green and Sustainable Energy Housing Forum and Fair at SIAST Palliser Campus on Saturday, Feb. 11, 2012.

Building a house for $35,000 and using 80 per cent recycled materials is a task that not only can happen, but in fact has in Regina.

Eric Penner de Waal, owner of Waalnut Construction, said his business is concerned with “Earth-conscious building” and it’s a goal requiring versatility and imagination.

“Green building isn’t just a set of rules,” he told the audience during a Saturday morning session of the 2012 Green and Sustainable Energy Housing Forum and Fair at SIAST Palliser Campus.

As an expression of his ideals, last year de Waal set out on a mission — to build a usable and efficient house with 80 per cent recycled materials. This required some scavenging.

“So we started collecting garbage,” he said, adding about 2-3 of his staff spent five days looking for spare building items it garbage bins and construction sites. de Waal said he was able to use the Habitat for Humanity ReStore as a source for project volunteers.

Signs played an important role in the homes construction, quite literally. According to de Waal, 90 per cent of the outside wall was sheeted with plywood from used signs, which he was able to collect from local sign companies.

“We took all this signage they had and took it to the ReStore.”

The goal was to erect the home, a small modular cottage, within just a few days in August. Because of the unique nature of the project, CBC filmed the operation. These were all new experiences for de Waal.

“I never built a house in three days before, nor have I tried to do it out of recycled materials, and it turns out it works.”

For more on this story, read an upcoming edition of the Times-Herald.

via Building a home from spare parts – News – The Moose Jaw Times Herald.

Pacific NW | Used materials are reborn into charming garden sheds | Seattle Times Newspaper

Bob Bowling guides a shed, with the help of a boom truck, into its spot in the garden. Every shed he makes is uniquely designed and crafted from mostly recycled and repurposed materials.

LIKE MUSHROOMS in damp autumn woods, Bob Bowlings sheds are popping up all over South Whidbey Island. Small enough to squeeze into a garden corner or side yard, yet large enough to house chickens, hold a yoga mat or tools, the sheds are drop-dead charming.

Is it the peaked roofs, the cupolas and aged windowpanes that lend a sense of history to each tidy little footprint of a building? Perhaps its that Bowling has mastered the perfect proportions and garnishes to appeal to our fantasies of a sweet little destination shed. Gardeners seem to share a universal gene for outbuildings, and Bowling has tapped right into that.

After his success at the past few Northwest Flower & Garden Shows, where he won “Best of Show” in the exhibitor category, Bowling is busy building custom designs.

Dont be tricked by the cute window boxes and clever cupolas. These sheds are practical. The windows hinge wide open, the roofs are sturdy galvanized metal with overhangs, and the chicken coops come with nesting boxes and windows low enough to give the birds a view out into the garden.How did Bowling hit on the formula for irresistible sheds? “I never draw them, they just evolve,” he explains. Kind of like how he got into building sheds in the first place.

Continue reading Pacific NW | Used materials are reborn into charming garden sheds | Seattle Times Newspaper

Habitat for Humanity ReStore “critically low” on inventory | Nooga.com

The Habitat for Humanity ReStore is currently at a “critically low mass” of inventory and in need of donations to refill the store.

Director Tina Shaw-Cox said this is not a problem the store has faced in the past, but since the move to a larger location on East Main Street, coupled with a low point in the year for donations, the store could use some help from the public.

“We are trying to reach out and say, ‘Hey, we are still here.’ It’s kind of a call to action,” she said. “If everyone could reach out and help, we would greatly appreciate it.”

via Habitat for Humanity ReStore “critically low” on inventory | Nooga.com.

From the junkyard to the garden: Artists reclaim materials for masterpieces – San Jose Mercury News

Artists create with found and recycled items

Beauty is in the eye of the guy picking through a pile of discarded concrete on the side of the road to extract several pieces of rebar. Or the woman scouring the beach for shards of glass, washed ashore from faraway lands.

Items that would appear to most of us as junk — destined for the landfill or recycle bin — are often collected by artists who see things differently.

Artists create with found and recycled items

They can see the potential of rusty wrenches for the bones of a fanciful robot. Or picture how a broken-down headboard will make a unique garden bench. They perceive that stacked ceramic tiles make a great pedestal, perhaps for a friendly gnome. And they can envision how old box springs can coil into new life as ornamental designs along a fence.

We recently met up with five artists in the Bay Area who create work from reclaimed materials, and who have this kind of art down to a science.

Read the whole article here:  From the junkyard to the garden: Artists reclaim materials for masterpieces – San Jose Mercury News.

Recycled Lumber at North Fork – Woody Biomass Utilization

Tad Mason & Marc Mandel look at the inventory of reclaimed lumber

We were fortunate enough to meet with Marc Mandel of Crossroads Recycled Lumber which is a reclaimed lumber business located on part of the site.  The primary source of wood is building deconstruction projects in California and other locations across the US.  It was interesting to see the inventory of material and to see the amount of work that is needed to “reclaim” the wood.  Nails are a big problem and need to be pulled out with hand tools.  A metal detector is used to assist in this process as any residual metal would severely damage saw blades and other milling equipment.

Typically, lumber is processed to order and I now understand why it costs three times as much as regular lumber – it requires a lot of labor and the product is highly desirable.  Markets for the reclaimed lumber are national and I was intrigued to hear that some has been used in the new Li Ka Shing Center for Biomedical and Health Sciences building at UC Berkeley.  The Crossroads Recycled Lumber website has pictures and information for projects that lumber has been supplied to.

Lumber prior to processing - note the nails that all have to be removed by hand

 

Timbers from a 1909 shipwreck off the Washington Coast

via Recycled Lumber at North Fork – Woody Biomass Utilization.

The green dividend from reusing older buildings | Kaid Benfield’s Blog | Switchboard, from NRDC

adaptive reuse of older building in the Pearl District, Portland (by: Patrick Dirden, creative commons license)

 But is it good for the environment?  Lots of people think so, including architect Carl Elefante, who coined the wonderful phrase, “the greenest building is one that is already built,” because you don’t have to use environmental resources in constructing its replacement.

 

Read the rest of the article at  The green dividend from reusing older buildings | Kaid Benfield’s Blog | Switchboard, from NRDC.

Woodworker gives new life to reclaimed materials | SeacoastOnline.com

“Occasionally, my inspiration is so strong, I wake up at 2:30 in the morning to go to the workshop to continue working on a project just to see the end result,” said the 40-year-old owner of Rustique, a custom woodworking workshop located at the North Dam Mill in Biddeford.

 

For information on Bob McGrath’s work, visit www.antiquewoodcreations.com.

via Woodworker gives new life to reclaimed materials | SeacoastOnline.com.

Seattle woman might not get to marry doomed warehouse | Seattle’s Big Blog – seattlepi.com

“I take you, doomed building, to be my wife…” (Getty Images)

 

She writes on Facebook that the apartments will “disintegrate our unique creative culture and render our neighborhood even more unaffordable.” She’d like the site to remain open as “community space.”

 

 

via Seattle woman might not get to marry doomed warehouse | Seattle’s Big Blog – seattlepi.com.

Creative types will consider new ways to use castoffs at Urbanminers in Hamden – The New Haven Register – Serving New Haven, Connecticut

 

Urbanminers is one of the best playgrounds around, and if you haven’t been yet, you might just want to take a trip there. Run by Joseph DeRisi since 2007, it’s a salvage, deconstruction and used goods showplace, and it’s filled with an assortment of wood, pipes, metal, old windows, doors, floors, cabinetry — you name it.

via Creative types will consider new ways to use castoffs at Urbanminers in Hamden (video)- The New Haven Register – Serving New Haven, Connecticut.

The Mars Bar Lives Again: Wood From Razed Landmark Saved for Art Exhibit – DNAinfo.com

Mars Bar

 

That is why the bar, shuttered last summer, was included on a list of 12 razed “historical sites” where salvaged lumber will be used for a furniture-design exhibition.

The event, called 12 x 12, will pair a dozen contemporary furniture designers with lumber reclaimed from a dozen demolished New York City structures, including many with deep links to the city’s cultural, architectural and economic history.

 

via The Mars Bar Lives Again: Wood From Razed Landmark Saved for Art Exhibit – DNAinfo.com.

The Williamson Daily News – Condemned homes within city creating major concerns

 

Staff Photo/RACHEL C DOVE 
Pictured is a house located on Russell Steps in Williamson that has been condemned and is slated for demolition.

 

“Simply put – recycle and re-use.”

McCormick has ideas for other homes that are presently uninhabitable too, expressing that he would like the city to work with organizations such as Habitat for Humanity that would renovate homes that are salvageable and have not yet reached the point of no return.

via The Williamson Daily News – Condemned homes within city creating major concerns.

New Study Shows That It Can Be Better to Renovate Existing Green Buildings Than Build New Ones | Ecocentric | TIME.com

Phil Ashley

PHIL ASHLEY

 A study by the Preservation Green Lab of the National Trust for Historic Preservation shows building reuse almost always has fewer environmental impacts than new construction—which means we’d be smart to spend at least as much time renovating existing buildings as we do lionizing fancy new green construction.

 

via New Study Shows That It Can Be Better to Renovate Existing Green Buildings Than Build New Ones | Ecocentric | TIME.com.

12×12 Design Competition Calls for Entrants to Upcycle Historic NYC Buildings Into Contemporary Furniture | Inhabitat New York City

green design, eco design, sustainable design, 3rd Ward, Build it Green NYC, Sawkill Lumber Company, 12 x 12 contest, reclaimed materials, historic New York, furniture contest, 2012 Design Week

Calling all New York furniture designers! Third Ward, Build it Green NYC and Sawkill Lumber Company have launched the 12 x 12 design contest, a unique opportunity to repurpose a piece of New York’s past. Twelve lucky designers will be chosen to recycle materials from twelve historic sites in New York City into innovative furniture pieces, which will then be exhibited at Spring 2012 Design Week!

via 12×12 Design Competition Calls for Entrants to Upcycle Historic NYC Buildings Into Contemporary Furniture | Inhabitat New York City.

ReUse It helps others help themselves – McPherson, KS – The McPherson Sentinel

LaVon Ediger, a well-known local contractor for many years, first conceived the idea for the store which collects and sells used or new excess building materials, tools, hardware, electrical and plumbing fixtures, furniture, floor coverings and much more. He has been overwhelmed by the community response in the forms of a building that wasn’t even for sale, and yet was made available for purchase for the Center; a strong support system of board members from construction, finance, fundraising and many other disciplines who were willing to serve; and since opening, a large and growing base of customers who not only purchase items with proceeds going to other not-for-profits, but who also donate a steady supply of goods to be made available for sale.

via ReUse It helps others help themselves – McPherson, KS – The McPherson Sentinel.

Report Shows More Recycling Would Create Green Jobs | Green-Buildings.com

The environmental benefits of recycling have been extolled frequently by sustainable leaders, but a report shows the United States could make more economic headway if it were to increase the percentage of municipal solid waste (MSW) and construction and demolition debris (C&D) it recycles.

The “More Jobs: Less Pollution” study, prepared by the Tellus Institute with Sound Resource Management on behalf of six prominent sustainability advocacy groups, reported that only 33 percent of the country’s MSW is diverted from disposal. If the country were to recycle as much as 75 percent of its MSW and C&D by 2030, it would directly create more than 2.3 million environmental jobs in each of those sectors, said the report.

That would be roughly 1.5 million more MSW and C&D jobs than were associated with the recycling industry in 2008, when 861,000 individuals were responsible for recycling management.

“Transforming the ‘waste sector’ into a ‘materials management sector’ will create more jobs, reduce greenhouse gas emissions that cause climate change, and lower other types of pollution and related public health consequences,” said the report.

Green Jobs: Professional Certification for Municipal Solid Waste and Construction and Demolition

Even at current rates of diversion, qualified waste management professionals remain in-demand for MSW and C&D positions. Individuals can increase their qualifications for these environmental jobs by securing training and credentials from reputable organizations.

The Solid Waste Association of North America (SWANA) is one of the country’s top institutions for granting waste management credentials, and many public and private employers look highly on individuals with SWANA credentials. The organization hosts training and accreditation testing for both the MSW and C&D sectors.

There are other organization that offer similar educational opportunities. WasteCap Resource Solutions is one of the more prominent non-SWANA providers of C&D accreditation.

via Report Shows More Recycling Would Create Green Jobs | Green-Buildings.com.

ReNew appeals for help – Brattleboro Reformer

 

Since opening in September 2005, ReNew Salvage has been committed to keeping building materials out of the landfills, and to strengthening the local community with job programs.

For more than six years the non-profit organization has been able to grow by charging home owners to take down their structures piece by piece, and then by reselling those construction materials at a reduced price.

 

via ReNew appeals for help – Brattleboro Reformer.

2Modern Blog | Modern Furniture and Design Blog

Rewashlamp Project

“My name is Tó Martins, I’m a Portuguese designer and it’s with great passion for my work that I’m letting you know the REWASHLAMP project. The project uncovers a new lighting concept, which advocates the reuse of materials coupled with small scale production, 100% manual, allowing myself to run all processes, from creation to — Continue reading

via 2Modern Blog | Modern Furniture and Design Blog.

DeConstruction program manager sees only potential in destruction – People – NewsObserver.com

 

“Joel has really been the driver to keep the program going and keeping it successful,” says John Stees, director of ReStore operations for Habitat Wake, where salvaged parts of homes are sold.

“I think everyone likes the goal, but he really brings the passion to it that keeps people energized.”

via DeConstruction program manager sees only potential in destruction – People – NewsObserver.com.

Pacific NW | Seattle’s old buildings: Opportunities, not obstacles | Seattle Times Newspaper

 

A jazzy "streamline moderne" storefront spruced up the post-World War II commercial district of Seattle's Roosevelt neighborhood.

Seattle’s old buildings should be maintained and upgraded as the city evolves, says writer Lawrence Kreisman, program director of Historic Seattle. Reusing these old buildings, he says, is one of the best ways to improve the environment. It’s much greener than building green from scratch. And it can make good business sense.

via Pacific NW | Seattle’s old buildings: Opportunities, not obstacles | Seattle Times Newspaper.

Office to rise from the rubble | Stuff.co.nz

Tim Bishop, left, of SHAC, and Clayton Prest, of Gapfiller, select a door from Pumphouse Demolition for an office made from recycled materials.

Tim Bishop, left, of SHAC, and Clayton Prest, of Gapfiller, select a door from Pumphouse Demolition for an office made from recycled materials.

One person’s rubble might be potential material for Gap Filler’s new office.

Sustainable Habitat Challenge (SHAC) and ReGeneration Trust New Zealand are collaborating to build an office for Gap Filler in Colombo St, Sydenham, with the help of volunteers and as many recycled or sustainable materials as possible.

Gap Filler project co-ordinator Coralie Winn said she was humbled by the plan.

“It’s a very generous gesture that they are doing this for us and also teaching young people building and design skills,” she said.

via Office to rise from the rubble | Stuff.co.nz.

Tiger Woods’ Ex-Wife Donates Items From Demolished Home To Charity – Sports News Story – WPBF West Palm Beach

 

Woods’ ex-wife Elin Nordegren donated items that were salvaged from her $12 million home at Seminole Landing in North Palm Beach.

Dozens of people were waiting outside the Stuart store before the doors opened Tuesday at 8:30 a.m.

“I knew it was going to be crazy when I was on the phone out front yesterday and I saw people on their tiptoes looking over the fence in the back,” said Mike Readling, director of resource development.

 

 

via Tiger Woods’ Ex-Wife Donates Items From Demolished Home To Charity – Sports News Story – WPBF West Palm Beach.

PlanetReuse: PlanetReuse Begins Beta Testing New National Online Platform for Reuse Centers

PlanetReuse Begins Beta Testing New National Online Platform for Reuse Centers

Since 2008, PlanetReuse has been expertly matching commercial materials with designers, builders and owners to save projects money, serve Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) efforts and sustain the planet.PlanetReuse is now expanding its services to make use of reclaimed building materials more commonplace in the residential construction market.

via PlanetReuse: PlanetReuse Begins Beta Testing New National Online Platform for Reuse Centers.

Beams from elevated I-40 Crosstown to be given to counties across Oklahoma | NewsOK.com

Parts of the elevated Interstate 40 Crosstown, which should be gone from view later this year, will be used to build county bridges across the state. Steel beams from the nearly 50-year-old structure will be used in building as many as 300 county bridges.

photo - Steel beams supporting the deck of the elevated Interstate 40 Crosstown, such as these near Bass Pro Drive in downtown Oklahoma City, will be salvaged and made available to county bridge projects across the state.<br /> <strong>PAUL B. SOUTHERLAND - THE OKLAHOMAN</strong>

 

Beams from elevated I-40 Crosstown to be given to counties across Oklahoma

“We think that’s a great deal for the taxpayers,” Deputy Transportation Department Director Gary Evans said. “It’s a great deal to re-task those beams. It shows how state government and county government can work together.

 

via Beams from elevated I-40 Crosstown to be given to counties across Oklahoma | NewsOK.com.

Buyers needed for complete salvage yard clear out – SalvoNews.com

January 05, 2012, 11:21 AM

 

Leicestershire, UK – Worthington Demolition in Hinckley is closing down its two acre salvage yard. For fifty years the family run business has saved interesting pieces of architectural salvage and reclaimed materials from demolition sites. The land the salvage yard is situated on has to be cleared by March. The complete contents of the yard including 200 old doors, a stone portico, reclaimed bricks and roof tiles, portacabins, tools and equipment needs to be sold.

For more information, contact Bill Worthington on 07767 413088.

via Buyers needed for complete salvage yard clear out – SalvoNews.com.

Lexington Habitat for Humanity ReStore surpasses $1 million in sales for 2011 | KyForward.com

 

Lexington Habitat’s ReStore is a home improvement resale store that opened in May 2001 and was the first store of its kind in Kentucky. The store sells donated new and gently used furniture, home accessories, building supplies and appliances. The Lexington Habitat ReStore hours are Monday-Saturday 10 a.m. To 5 p.m. and it is open to the public.

via Lexington Habitat for Humanity ReStore surpasses $1 million in sales for 2011 | KyForward.com.

REUSE 5.0 Kuwait

REUSE is an annual exposition that serves as an opportunity for non-profit organizations, companies, professionals and aspiring creative talents to showcase their accomplishments in the fields of social responsibility and sustainability via a range of artistic mediums and interactive activities for the general public.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_profilepage&v=iMoz83MANCM

ReUse Action and Rusted Grain are Partners in Sustainability – Buffalo Rising

 

Although their businesses are different in name, Michael Gainer of ReUse Action and Megan McNally of Rusted Grain are partners. Both are focused on sustainability and achieve this goal through making new creations from old material. Reclaimed wood from doors, flooring, cabinets, garages, and even church pews can be restructured and cleaned up to yield everything from furniture to knick-knacks.

via ReUse Action and Rusted Grain are Partners in Sustainability – Buffalo Rising.