Category Archives: Deconstruction

Centuries Old Tradition Of Recycling Bricks Finally Gets Certified — Danish Company Is World’s First Supplier | CleanTechnica

bricks1

Well, what are we waiting for? Let’s hammer some bricks!

It is a genuinely comforting thought, that when you look at a brick building any one of those bricks can originate from many different places. Apart from the green-tech-recycling aspect, this makes buildings ooze of history — even if they are brand new.

Source: Centuries Old Tradition Of Recycling Bricks Finally Gets Certified — Danish Company Is World’s First Supplier | CleanTechnica

Derelict Building Grant applications due April 4 | News | communitynewspapergroup.com

The grant program was instituted by state legislation to help rural communities with populations of 5,000 or less to deconstruct or renovate abandoned commercial and public structures.

The program emphasizes reuse and recycling of building items, helps improve street appearance and commercial development, and alleviates the environmental concern these buildings can pose. Financial assistance includes asbestos removal, building deconstruction and renovation, and other environmental services.

Source: Derelict Building Grant applications due April 4 | News | communitynewspapergroup.com

UIX: Turning trash into money is going to take a community effort

The South Kent Landfill, image courtesy Kent County.

“There are a lot of building materials and resources that are winding up in landfills,” Wieland says. “People are actually talking about deconstructing things instead of just demolishing them. We’re looking at all the waste materials that come out of the building industry and reusing them is one of the ways to reduce that waste.”

Source: UIX: Turning trash into money is going to take a community effort

Otter Tail County landmark to be preserved in Fergus Falls | Perham Focus

The historic Regional Treatment Center tower, close to the county government services center in northwest Fergus Falls, will be preserved while other sections of the RTC complex will be part of deconstruction. Tom Hintgen/Otter Tail County Correspondent.

The city of Fergus Falls is seeking $8.9 million from the state legislature to complete deconstruction on remaining sections of the RTC campus which includes 550,000 square feet of space on the northside of Fergus Falls. The Regional Treatment Center was originally built in 1890 by the state of Minnesota to house 3,500 patients with mental illness. During the 1950s and 1960s that number was reduced to close to 2,000 residents, cared for by 500 state employees.

Source: Otter Tail County landmark to be preserved in Fergus Falls | Perham Focus

St. John’s council encouraging ‘responsible demolition’ | Local | News | The Telegram

“Heritage is one of our main economic drivers in the city. The deconstruction policy — if we had one — would address salvaging any materials in the case where demolition is absolutely necessary.”

Source: St. John’s council encouraging ‘responsible demolition’ | Local | News | The Telegram

Historic Galbraith House coming down – Capitol Hill Times

Photo courtesy of Donald Brewer: The city landmarked Galbraith House has been approved for demolition. Earthwise will be reclaiming portions of the structure.

A memo attached to the agreement states controls and incentives were put in place after the designation, and Sound came back to the landmarks board in 2009 to ask for controls to be removed, “stating that demolition was necessary to generate a reasonable economic return on the property.”

Source: Historic Galbraith House coming down – Capitol Hill Times

Deconstruction junction: Milwaukee’s reuse future – The Daily Reporter – WI Construction News & Bids

(Image courtesy of the Delta Institute via Extracting Value through Deconstruction)

On Jan. 1, the country’s second deconstruction ordinance went into effect in Milwaukee. In short, the ordinance “provides deconstruction requirements for the removal of Milwaukee’s older and more historic primary dwelling structures.” Deconstruction, in contrast to demolition, is the process of systematically dismantling a structure in an environmentally, socially and economically responsible manner, aiming to maximize the recovery of materials for reuse and recycling. The ordinance targets primary-dwelling structures built in 1929 or earlier. This reason for this specification? The likelihood that those structures will contain old-growth lumber and other valuable building materials.

Source: Deconstruction junction: Milwaukee’s reuse future – The Daily Reporter – WI Construction News & Bids

Deconstruction begins on old Butte Creek Mill site | KTVL

The deconstruction is in preparation for the installation of the Keller Mill this Spring. The Keller Mill has been nonoperational for over 60 years, but was built in the same time period as the Butte Creek Mill. (Genevieve Grippo/KTVL)

The deconstruction is in preparation for the installation of the Keller Mill this Spring. The Keller Mill has been nonoperational for over 60 years, but was built in the same time period as Butte Creek. Using the donated parts of the Keller Mill will contribute to keeping the rebuild as authentic as possible.”The grinding wheel– all that stuff is going to be back as it was. So it’ll be grinding flour again,” said Hammonds.

Source: Deconstruction begins on old Butte Creek Mill site | KTVL

Home design: How to refresh your kitchen AND look after the planet | Property | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Ex-display kitchen and Vapos hot water tap

The Used Kitchen Company sells ex-display kitchens / Caple’s Vapos hot water tap costs from £1,006

“There is no sense in hiring a skip and sending a kitchen to landfill when we could recycle it and allow its owner to earn some cash by selling it on.”

Source: Home design: How to refresh your kitchen AND look after the planet | Property | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

AmeriCorps helps renovate Mtn. View’s House of Abigail | Local News | westplainsdailyquill.net

Mtn. View, Mo.

AN 11-PERSON TEAM from Americorps is in Mtn. View helping renovate House of Abigail. Team members Adrian Stephen and Rachel Silverman are carrying boards into the house for a floor the team is building.

Over the course of this six-week project, the AmeriCorps team will start by completing the deconstruction of the building’s interior. This will include removing the reaming walls, ceilings, floors, plumbing and other objects that cannot be reused after the renovation.

Source: AmeriCorps helps renovate Mtn. View’s House of Abigail | Local News | westplainsdailyquill.net

Nelson couple rebuild home with materials salvaged from red-zoned cottage | Stuff.co.nz

Mike Moss, left with the kauri stairs of the new home at the Nelson Eco-Village. The dis-assembled home on Red Zoned ...

Mike Moss, left with the kauri stairs of the new home at the Nelson Eco-Village. The dis-assembled home on Red Zoned land in Christchurch was shipped it to Nelson.

“It was a lot like a kid with a box of Lego, you have got one house made out of it and you pull it all to bits, put it back in the box and then make another one but it looks completely different.” He estimated a third of the materials used in the build were recycled. Some from their home in Christchurch, other parts from the demolition yard. He estimated the value of recycled materials in the house was about $150,000.

Source: Nelson couple rebuild home with materials salvaged from red-zoned cottage | Stuff.co.nz

Historic barn to come down – piece by piece | Free Press Standard

A barn built on school board property in the 1800s will be distmantled and moved in January. The barn was sold in November at a public auction.

ECO Deconstruction Owner Jeff Albert told Director of Programs Ed Robinson every piece from the old barn will be re-purposed, redesigned, and given new life.  Much of the old barn wood he purchases is used for flooring.“It looks really good.  It is in really good condition from what I can see.  We will start at the top and work our way down.  People really like to use the hand hewn timbers when building homes.  And the stones have a good value too,” Albert said.

Source: Historic barn to come down – piece by piece | Free Press Standard

Downtown Algonquin building to be demolished for $26K | Northwest Herald

Mike Malory – photo credit

Historic commissioners would be allowed to go through the building and salvage anything they choose before demolition.Mitchard said the brick from the building will be preserved and used in the plaza area between Village Hall and Bold American Fare restaurant.“Because it is common brick and it looks cool, we are going to try to use it to build a community fire pit there to be used for gathering,” Mitchard said. “We are dreaming at this point of what we could do with it.”

Source: Downtown Algonquin building to be demolished for $26K | Northwest Herald

SustainableScoop- Jim Schulman, Alliance for Regional Cooperation – YouTube

Founder of Community Forklift & Executive Manager of the Alliance for Regional Cooperation, Jim Schulman discusses his work on the Building Materials Reuse Association. His work in cooperation with the DC Sierra Club and others are pushing building code changes to help rescue building materials from the waste stream.

New city law requires deconstruction rather than demolition – OnMilwaukee

Demolition dumps materials into landfills, boosts carbon emissions and releases asbestos and other harmful matter into the air, says Ald. Bob Bauman.

The Common Council approved the new deconstruction ordinance – which was co-sponsored by Alds. Nik Kovac and Khalif Rainey – Tuesday, and the rule that goes into effect on Jan. 1, 2018, requires deconstruction rather than demolition of most one- to four-family buildings built before 1930 that are scheduled to be razed.

Source: New city law requires deconstruction rather than demolition – OnMilwaukee

Deconstruction Of Webber Building Downtown Almost Complete – Alabama News

“A long slow goodbye”…that’s how Lois Cortell, Senior Development Manager for the city, described the deconstruction of the Webber Building, also known as the Old Montgomery Theatre downtown.The deconstruction process has been ongoing for about a year now. Cortell says it’s not to be confused with demolition.”One of the conditions of the sale was to maximize the salvage of the materials and to do that really involved a slow deconstruction” she explained.

Source: Deconstruction Of Webber Building Downtown Almost Complete – Alabama News

Owen ‘investing in the future by repurposing the past’ | Herald Citizen

John Owen talks about his passion for architectural salvage in his new shop, Dry Levee Architectural Salvage.
TY KERNEA | HERALD-CITIZEN

A lot of the items he’s salvaged have been leased for props in weddings. “That’s a trend that’s starting to really take off,” he said. Several school teachers also approached him asking about historic elements he has found. “It’s a hands-on tool for those kids,” he said. One of the first projects was the deconstruction of a log cabin that housed 10 children in the early 1900s. “It was a small cabin,” he said. “When we took it down, the grandson of one of those kids found me and asked what I did with it. He wanted us to rebuild it for him. So that’s what we did.”

Source: Owen ‘investing in the future by repurposing the past’ | Herald Citizen

Lawsuit says nonprofit Second Chance misled consumers – Baltimore Sun

“Second Chance and the appraisal company had a mountain of information about the IRS’ hostile view of the benefits that the defendants were promoting,” said Ugo Colella, a partner with Duane Morris, the law firm representing the plaintiffs. “The representations they were making were at best incomplete, and at worst, they were hiding this information to ensure the donors keep coming. Either way, the defendants withheld critical information from Maryland consumers.”

Source: Lawsuit says nonprofit Second Chance misled consumers – Baltimore Sun

Duane Morris LLP Announces: Consumers File Class Action Against Baltimore Nonprofit Second Chance, Inc. and Virginia-Based Appraisal Company NoVaStar Appraisals, Inc. | Business Wire

The problem, the lawsuit contends, is that Second Chance and NoVaStar have known for many years that (1) the IRS audited consumers and did not allow tax refunds or deductions for house donations made to Second Chance, and (2) that NoVaStar’s appraisals were IRS non-compliant. According to the complaint, despite this knowledge, Second Chance and NoVaStar concealed that information from Maryland consumers, including Gogtay and Dixit.

Source: Duane Morris LLP Announces: Consumers File Class Action Against Baltimore Nonprofit Second Chance, Inc. and Virginia-Based Appraisal Company NoVaStar Appraisals, Inc. | Business Wire

Can Bauman and Kovac Create Jobs? » Urban Milwaukee

City owned home at 2817-19 North 22nd Street. Photo from the City of Milwaukee.

The ordinance will kick in whenever the city is set to demolish a structure or a private contractor seeks a permit to demolish. And there are exceptions to the mandate to deconstruct if there are safety considerations or the salvageable materials have been damaged by something like a fire. While Bauman and Kovac are both historic preservation hawks in Milwaukee, because demolition and deconstruction jobs employ individuals from underserved communities in the city Bauman said “I do see this primarily as a job creation tool.”

Source: Can Bauman and Kovac Create Jobs? » Urban Milwaukee

Decon and Reuse Expo ’17: Portland’s landmark deconstruction ordinance takes center stage | KATU

“If we can save that amount of space in the landfills, that means that we’re not generating emissions from the decaying of those materials,” said expo organizer and re-use consultant, Sara Badiali. “The environmental impact is astounding.”

Source: Decon and Reuse Expo ’17: Portland’s landmark deconstruction ordinance takes center stage | KATU

Company offers lesson in architectural salvage

The eight to 10 participants then we will go to a “cracker shack” and pull it apart, with hands-on training and oversight “because most of salvage is understanding the ‘feel’ of the wood and how to remove items based on pressure points, leverage, and listening to the cues that the wood gives you.”This $100 per person course — $75 for a second person from the same family or organization — will be fun but hard work. There are risks involved with deconstruction and anyone entering the jobsite must acknowledge and sign a waiver, the company said.

Source: Company offers lesson in architectural salvage

Master of Special Problem Solving, Dave Bennink Disassembles 1,000 Buildings by Hand – Sara Badiali

 

Master of Special Problem Solving, Dave Bennink Disassembles 1,000 Buildings by Hand  

by Sara Badiali

Imagine you are packing your car for a trip. You can only move your gear once, but you still have to maximize space.  Sound difficult?  Now imagine you have to do it with a stranger’s gear.  That’s what Dave Bennink of Re-Use Consulting has been doing almost every week for the past 25 years.

But instead of gear, he does it with entire dismantled buildings.  Dave’s expertise is in disassembling structures, staging the components for transport, and then moving them to be resold.

Dave deconstructs buildings for reuse. He’s dismantled 1,000 structures, in 42 states and 4 providences. He is a master of spatial problem solving. The materials are so big and take up so much space on site that they can only be moved once.

Dave Bennink’s extensive knowledge and experience meant that when the City of Portland passed their new Deconstruction Ordinance, they asked Dave to train the City’s first Certified Deconstruction Contractors. They also tapped him to train and certify a new deconstruction workforce.

In addition to his own business dismantling structures, Dave is a certified Deconstruction Trainer for the Building Material Reuse Association. He’s done trainings for the City of Seattle, Vancouver, other municipalities, numerous small businesses and organizations.

 

Students are drilled in safety, technique, material recovery, recycling, diversion equations, staging and selling materials. All of the lessons take place in the actual building the students are deconstructing.

It is a common site to see Dave drawing out waste diversion calculations on the interior walls one day, and the next day the walls are gone.  If you ever buy reclaimed materials with calculations on them, you may have just purchased a piece of one of Dave’s many classrooms.

Along with his own business, and deconstruction training, Dave also is a consultant for reclaimed building material reuse start-ups. Guiding entrepreneurs with reuse business planning, deconstruction jobs, and marketing used building materials is Dave’s passion.

He is happy to help new converts into the world of environmental stewardship, job creation, community building, and healthy alternatives to demolition. His motto is “Say no to the track hoe”.

 

 

If you are interested in meeting Dave Bennink you can see him present twice at the Decon + Reuse ’17 Expo: Saving Our Past, Building the Future conference in Portland, Oregon on September 24th-27th. Dave will be on a panel with some of his certified deconstruction students. He will also be speaking on the basic principles of starting a reuse business (including spatial acumen).

Dave will be presenting at the Decon + Reuse ’17 Expo with over 50 other building material reuse experts, and hundreds of participants. This is the largest building material reuse event in the country and is being hosted by the City of Portland, Metro, the Reclamation Administration, and Portland State University’s Institute for Sustainable Solutions.

 

Dave Bennink owns and operates Re-Use Consulting, which you can find it at ReuseConsulting.com.  Or contact him at re-use@comcast.net or (360) 201-6977.

Deconstruction hailed as answer for ailing cities

Details, an organization in Baltimore, is one of dozens of similar groups around the country helping to remake cities through deconstruction. USA TODAY

Advocates hail deconstruction as a win-win that is more economical and environmentally friendly than demolition. They say it creates needed jobs and can help depressed cities turn things around.  “The systematic deconstruction and dismantling of buildings has a profound role in transforming communities,” said Anne Nicklin, executive director of the Building Materials Reuse Association, based in Chicago. Deconstruction seems to be on the rise, Nicklin said, citing programs not only in Baltimore, but also in Chicago, Detroit, Portland, Buffalo, Cleveland and other places.

Source: Deconstruction hailed as answer for ailing cities

Fireworks Flash Sale Thru Friday – Last Chance for Discount Tix

Last chance for earlybird pricing + outstanding keynotes + book your hotel now!

Fireworks Flash Sale Thru Friday!

Say that five times fast…

In keeping with a celebratory week, we’ve created a special sale and brought back earlybird pricing on Decon + Reuse ’17 for five days only!. Register today to lock in the savings, or wait til Sunday and help donate a bit extra to the BMRA.

Jim Lindberg & Adam Minter – Keynote Speakers

We have locked down two really outstanding keynote speakers for the conference. On Monday September 25th, Adam Minter will kick off the conference speaking to the globalization of reuse and recycling markets. Then on Tuesday we’ll hear from Jim Lindberg of Preservation Green Lab on how reuse is a key tool of re-urbanization and future building.

Hotel Blocks in Portland

The low low pricing that we managed to negotiate at two hotels in Portland expires on 7/24/17 – book your rooms today!

Loch sunglasses are made of 500-year-old timbers from the Great Lakes : TreeHugger

© Loch

These logs are from trees that began growing about 500 years old or more, the remaining spoils of the logging boom that ravished eastern Canada’s forests throughout the 19th century. At the time, millions of logs were transported along waterways, floated down rivers and over rapids and hauled across lakes by tugboats in giant ‘booms’. They were destined for the shipyards of Europe and sawmills of America. Sometimes these logs sank to the bottom of the lake, where they were preserved in the cold, dark water. Only now, nearly two hundred years later, are they resurfacing.

Source: Loch sunglasses are made of 500-year-old timbers from the Great Lakes : TreeHugger

Decon + Reuse ’17 Speakers invited by the Reclamation Administration

The Reclamation Administration has made a lot of friends over the years.

We are proud to say that over a third of the speakers for Decon + Reuse ’17 Expo: Saving our Past, Building the Future are from our invitations. These presenters have all been featured on the Reclamation Administration going as far back as 2011!

Here is a list of Presenters brought to you by the Reclamation Administration.  You can see them all in Portland, Oregon on September 24th – 27th at the Decon + Reuse ’17 Expo.

James Lindberg

Detroit Audio Lab

Eco3d

Sons of Sawdust

ReCor Door 

Ohio Materials Marketplace

Louise McRae

Viridian Reclaimed Wood

Futel

The Rockford Brand

Miigwech Aki Deconstruction

Pioneer Millworks

Space Monkey Designs/Fantom Foundry

diederick kraaijeveld

Wallace Detroit Guitars

Mayor Catherine Pugh Calls For $40 Million Investment Each Year In Deconstruction Projects And Affordable Housing | Town of Morningside Maryland

United Workers, an advocacy group, founded the Baltimore Housing Roundtable in 2013, by bringing 25 different organizations together to confront affordable-housing issues in the city. The group advocates the city to set up a land bank to expedite the conversion of vacant houses and properties to affordable housing and grant priority to ex-offenders for employment and training to work on such projects. It recommended “deconstruction” a process that will allow for more job opportunities and recycling of building materials.

Source: Mayor Catherine Pugh Calls For $40 Million Investment Each Year In Deconstruction Projects And Affordable Housing | Town of Morningside Maryland

Frank Jones Brewery redo saves architectural treasures

Mat Ouellette, assistant project manager for Chinburg Properties, shows an orginal low ceiling area that still remains, before a new level is built, at the Frank Jones Brew Yard in Portsmouth. [Rich Beauchesne/Seacoastonline]

“The quality is amazing,” said Spitzer, about the wood planks with aged patina. Spitzer said a local craftsman will use some of the timbers to make club room fixtures and tables, mill some for shelving and use other old planks for finish work. More of the pine timbers will be reused for counter tops and furniture, he said.

Source: Frank Jones Brewery redo saves architectural treasures

A salvager’s decades-long dream to build a museum of architectural artifacts – Curbed

Preserving part of the the Rivoli Theater in St. Louis Courtesy National Building Arts Center

“I just love old buildings,” Giles said. “It’s a big collection, without a doubt, the largest that I’m aware of, and the idea was to develop it as a comprehensive study collection. The idea has grown into a collection of pieces from all over the country. The history here is a national history.”

Source: A salvager’s decades-long dream to build a museum of architectural artifacts – Curbed

Wedge-shaped Acute House reuses materials from demolished cottage : TreeHugger

© Nic Granleese

Rather than discarding all the old materials, the architects strove to salvage and reuse as much of the old house as possible: wood boards, fencing, doorknobs and vents. The architects say: Like fragile museum artefacts, these were carefully removed, labelled, stored and re-installed in their original location on a new mount that not only highlights their charms by contrast but allows the house to live again in a new way.

Source: Wedge-shaped Acute House reuses materials from demolished cottage : TreeHugger

Old grain elevator in St. Anthony comes down | Ag/Business News | rexburgstandardjournal.com

A deconstruction crew, including a man with a chainsaw atop a crane bucket, slowly saws down a grain elevator that’s stood as a landmark of sort on the south side of St. Anthony for more than 100 years.  Joyce Edlefsen

Trost’s Feed and Seed started life in 1901 or 1902 as Miller Brothers. It burned down almost as soon as it was completed, but the brothers rebuilt it the next year. According to a sign painted on the Miller elevator, it dealt in grain, flour, produce, eggs, feed stuff, salt and coal.The Black Elevator, nicknamed for its dark, oxidized wood color, apparently was used at about the same time, and seemed to have been owned by the same people as the other elevators in town.

Source: Old grain elevator in St. Anthony comes down | Ag/Business News | rexburgstandardjournal.com

Beams from 1855 Massachusetts mill building salvaged for flooring and millwork | Woodworking Network

Working largely by hand, the crew was able to save virtually every stick in the building. Longleaf Lumber was able to salvage hemlock decking 3 inches thick and up to 28 inches wide, virgin growth white pine 6 x 15 inch timbers, and top grade 6 x 15 inch longleaf pine beams.

Source: Beams from 1855 Massachusetts mill building salvaged for flooring and millwork | Woodworking Network

Deconstruction of old homes creates more jobs in Portland | KGW.com

(Photo: Nina Mehlhaf)

That rule means a lot more certified deconstruction experts are needed. Tuesday, the city let us into a hands-on workshop at a home on Northwest 23rd Avenue, where 15 men and women were learning the trade.

Devon Campbell-Willliams is one of those trainees. He worked as a construction flagger before, and wanted to learn deconstruction technique hands on.

“You don’t want to go to straight in and straight up to pry up floorboards, if you do that you could crack the wood and it wouldn’t be reusable,” he said.

Source: Deconstruction of old homes creates more jobs in Portland | KGW.com

Shifting the Paradigm from Demolition to Reuse: New Tools – Preservation Leadership Forum – A Program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation

Deconstruction of an 1884 House in Portland. | Credit: Scott A. Tice

It is important to note, too, that Portland city leaders also considered deconstruction as a job engine. Although rehabilitation of an older building—one that is neither demolished nor deconstructed—is likely to generate more jobs than deconstruction, supporters of the ordinance noted that deconstruction will provide six to eight jobs for every one job associated with traditional mechanized demolition. Furthermore, although it doesn’t compare to the reuse of an entire building, deconstruction will provide carbon-reduction benefits by preserving the embodied energy of at least some existing building materials and by cutting the greenhouse gasses associated with sending waste to landfills.

Source: Shifting the Paradigm from Demolition to Reuse: New Tools – Preservation Leadership Forum – A Program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation

Journal Of Commerce – Cities looking at more deconstruction and salvaged materials

Christina Radvak leads Habitat for Humanity’s deconstruction team which removes useable materials from homes slated for demolition. The materials, construction materials, hardware and other useable goods, are sold through the non-profit society’s ReStores, which are located throughout B.C. ReStores are a popular shopping outlet for do-it-yourselfers and smaller contractors.

Badelt, a Buildex Vancouver panel member at session W33: Deconstruction and the Green Demolition Bylaw on Feb. 15-16, said the city brought the bylaw, which is similar to those in the U.S., into effect for two reasons. Cities want to reduce landfill materials, but many of these earlier homes contain quality wood and craftsmanship.

“These buildings have old-growth wood and we want to save those materials as well as the architectural details such as the old style windows. We saw a lot of material that could be salvaged and recycled,” he said. The bylaw also aligns itself with heritage conservation values in the city.

Source: Journal Of Commerce – Cities looking at more deconstruction and salvaged materials

Movers and Makers: Salvage Works’ stories are told in wood | KGW.com

Salvage Works, North Portland, Tracy Barry, KGW

Browning is part artist, part builder, so It’s not surprising that he is drawn to the inner beauty of the reclaimed lumber. And lucky for him, so are many others, just as eager to search for the stories hidden in every grain and to embrace the promise of reinvention.

Source: Movers and Makers: Salvage Works’ stories are told in wood | KGW.com

Update: Judge rules in favor of Merc demolition | Local | missoulian.com

“The members of Preserve Historic Missoula and all those supporting the appeal to preserve the historic Mercantile building are profoundly disappointed in Judge Deschamps’ ruling to permit the demolition of Missoula’s most iconic commercial building,” Hall wrote. “We have appreciated this opportunity to express our concerns through the judicial system and its thoughtful consideration.”

Hall wrote that PHM has maintained that the deconstruction permit process for the Merc was flawed. In particular, they believe that the process followed by the city council did not comply with the Historic Preservation Ordinance. They have requested that the law be clarified. Hall said nearly 4,700 people signed their petition affirming that the Merc is worth saving.

Source: Update: Judge rules in favor of Merc demolition | Local | missoulian.com

Reinventing heritage buildings isn’t new at all – the ancients did it too

With the addition of minarets, Hagia Sophia was converted from a Christian basilica to an Islamic mosque. Candace Richards, Author provided

This bold inclusion of old material in a new monument for Rome led to a whole new recycling trend in architecture. Decorative elements such as columns, capitals and architraves were given new life in buildings of the fourth century CE. The trend became so popular that new laws were created to protect public buildings from being stripped of their decoration. Only if a building could not be restored was it permitted to recycle that building’s materials.

Source: Reinventing heritage buildings isn’t new at all – the ancients did it too

Deconstruct vs. Demolish in Arlington

Photo detail

Photo by Ramona Campos December 16, 2016

The Allards got the name of Second Chance through an architect they had met. Once they realized the win-win situation that using Second Chance presented to them: making a tax deductible donation to deconstruct, paying less than demolishing would cost, doing something positive for young men who wanted to turn their lives around, and avoiding putting tons of materiel into a landfill: they were ready to sign on the dotted line. On top of that, the owner gets 15 points towards green home certification.

Source: Deconstruct vs. Demolish in Arlington

Local News: Winter Term project goes from remodeling to deconstruction (1/12/17) | Greencastle Banner-Graphic

Originally slated for a remodel, a condemned house at the DePauw Campus Farm is instead serving as a winter term project, with students (below) figuring out how to tear down the home with the smallest environmental impact. Courtesy photos/DEPAUW UNIVERSITY

But even that knowledge is useful, Everett argues, whether for an architect planning for the entire lifecycle of a building, or a college student learning the bigger picture of what it means to build a home.

“For us, even if the financial opportunities of deconstruction are few, the educational opportunities are extremely plentiful,” Everett said. In addition to the deconstruction aspect of the course, students are also being exposed to outside perspectives on the life of materials, with guest lectures from arts and humanities professors as well as recycling and building deconstruction professionals.

“The thing I most want students to take away from this course is an embodied understanding that they have the power to make real change in the world, right now,” Everett said. “Nothing stands between them and the work of making the world a better, more sensible, more caring, more mindful place – starting here, at DePauw, with this house.”

Source: Local News: Winter Term project goes from remodeling to deconstruction (1/12/17) | Greencastle Banner-Graphic

Hidden Treasure Abandoned Buildings: Changing Philly’s Demolition Game « CBS Philly

Philadelphia Community Corps executive director Greg Trainor inside a worksite in Fairmount. (Credit: Tom Rickert)

The job training nonprofit he [Greg Trainor] started in 2014 has graduated 18 students into OSHA-certified deconstruction technicians in the past year. He’s opened a 20,000 square foot warehouse in Kensington with classrooms and space for construction projects. And Greg and his job trainees have salvaged more than 50 tons of wood, metal, and building material from the bones of Philadelphia’s abandoned buildings.

Source: Hidden Treasure Abandoned Buildings: Changing Philly’s Demolition Game « CBS Philly

Citizen Carpentry Community Workshop & Tool Share by Marcis Curtis — Kickstarter

We need your help to finish building out our shop in its new location. We share building space with Refab STL, an amazing non-profit providing skills training to former combat veterans by deconstructing old buildings in and around St. Louis. These materials are then processed and stored for resale in the historic 40,000 square foot building along Route 66, which houses Citizen Carpentry’s new workshop. Citizen Carpentry aims to be the first worker-owned woodworking co-operative of its kind in the Midwest, encouraging community members, artists, and entrepreneurs to utilize our shop for their work. We have the chance to be a hub of creative revitalization, recycling, and skill-sharing in a city sorely lacking in opportunities.

Source: Kickstarter Citizen Carpentry Community Workshop & Tool Share

Travis Parkins collaborates in Circular Building project – Builders’ Merchants News

“We supplied the new material and, once the event had come to a close, the house was disassembled and we took all the materials back. This was followed by an examination of the condition, its presentation and value before determining possible reuse or recovery options. Distributors have a crucial role to play in the circular economy and it’s clear that strong collaborative linkages with solid supply chain support are essentials to a circular economy model.”

Source: Travis Parkins collaborates in Circular Building project – Builders’ Merchants News

Nonprofit’s founder has 2 missions: Save history, help veterans | Metro | stltoday.com

The nonprofit Refab does sustainable deconstruction

ReFab Founder Eric Scharz. Photo by J.B. Forbes.

Schwarz’s experience had taught him that in an increasingly imitative world, some people hungered for an authenticity conceived in the marriage of age and use.

He founded Refab, a salvage yard in south St. Louis, in a condemned building four years ago. At the time, he had about $3,000 in his pocket and an idea for salvaging discarded building materials and turning around the lives of veterans. Today, Schwarz leases a 40,000-square-foot warehouse off Gravois Avenue and employs 14 people. His budget for 2017 is $1.2 million. That growth is partly attributable to a backlash against the uniformity produced by globalization.

The customers who frequent this two story red-brick repository of rescued material are weary of seeing the same furniture, the same sinks and the same light fixtures — all of it mass-produced on the other side of the planet. “You go into a lot of houses — and I don’t know if we coined the phrase — but they are all ‘Lowes’d up,’” said Randy Miller, who was looking for material for his coffee shop in Southern Illinois. “This is a like a candy store.”

Source: Nonprofit’s founder has 2 missions: Save history, help veterans | Metro | stltoday.com