Category Archives: Deconstruction

Recycling+Building Materials – International Business Times

In today’s world “going green” has become a top priority in our society, and sustainable buildings and design are at the forefront of this green revolution. While many designers are focusing on passive and active energy systems, the reuse of recycled materials is beginning to stand out as an innovative, highly effective, and artistic expression of sustainable design. Reusing materials from existing on site and nearby site elements such as trees, structures, and paving is becoming a trend in the built environment, however more unorthodox materials such as soda cans and tires are being discovered as recyclable building materials. Materials and projects featured after the break.

Most common building materials today have recyclable alternatives. Concrete, metals, glass, brick and plastics can all be produced with some form of the previously used material, and this process of production lowers the energy requirement and emissions by up to ninety percent in most cases. Studio Gang Architects’ SOS Children’s Villages Lavezzorio Community Center utilized the ability to use left over concrete aggregate from construction sites in the surrounding Chicago area. The project features these different types of aggregate in an artistic expression of how and when the concrete was poured during construction.

Another popular trend regarding recycled building materials is the use of site provided materials. As environmental designers, we continually replace natural landscapes with our own built environment, and today our built environment is embellishing the natural environment in a responsible (while still aesthetic) manner. Projects such as the Ann Arbor District Library by inFORM Studio and the Jewish Reconstructionist Congregation Synagogue by Ross Barney Architects are reaping the harvest of their sites. The architects at inFORM researched the site for the Ann Arbor Library to find that ash trees from the surrounding forest were being destroyed by insects and could be salvaged into various surfaces within the building. Ross Barney Architects responded to the more urban site of the Jewish Reconstructionist Congregation Synagogue with a similar tactic by repurposing demolished trees into exterior sheathing, torn up paving and pre-existing structure into gabion walls, and even reusing part of the existing building foundation.

When a site has little to give, designers have begun to search within other demolished environments. Juan Luis Martínez Nahuel has found new uses for building elements from other architectural projects in his Recycled Materials Cottage in Chile. The design revolved around the available materials from demolished buildings including glazing from a previous patio as the main façade; eucalyptus and parquet floors as the primary surface covering; and steel and laminated beams from an exhibit as the main structure for the house.

While these methods of reused building materials have become popular in sustainable, contemporary architecture, other designers are experimenting with more unorthodox materials. Archi Union Architects Inc. have developed a wall system that contains a grid of empty soda cans in their mixed-use project,Can Cube. The can filled façade is even adjustable for daylighting by occupants.

Alonso de Garay Architects also discovered a new use for an uncommon object in the building system of their Recycled Building in Mexico City. A series of hanging car tires are constructed to possess and grow traditional species of Mexican plants. While creating a sustainable green wall system, the tires also define exterior space within the complex.

As the process of recycling materials continues to increase as a fashionable and sustainable statement in the architectural world, designers are proposing groundbreaking and futuristic methods that push the boundaries of how we think and build. NL Architects submitted an idea for The Silo Competition that transformed the structure of an old sewage treatment silo into a rock climbing facility and mixed-use residential and commercial spaces. This design addresses the structure and form as a reusable material able to contain an extremely efficient program.

Architects: Studio Gang ArchitectsinFORM StudioRoss Barney ArchitectsAlonso de Garay ArchitectsNL Architects
Photographs:  Paula BaileySteve HallJustin Machonachie, Juan Luis Martinez Nahuel, Sheng Zhonghai, Jimena Carranza, NL Architects

 

via Recycling+Building Materials – International Business Times.

Give building materials another go – Oregon

Christa Summers prices items while working at the Albany Habitat ReStore. The ReStores offer new life to previously used materials, a growing trend. (David Patton/Democrat-Herald)

Old blue jeans. Wine-stained barrels. Aged, weathered boards.

Most people would see these things and toss them in the trash. But a growing number of builders, artisans and homeowners are looking at them and seeing not an ending, but a beginning.

As reclaimed and recycled building materials grow in popularity, more and more old components are being saved from eternity in a landfill and given new life in someone else’s home.

“It’s about the lifestyle,” said Ben Metzger, owner of Metzger Green Build, a Corvallis construction company that has worked extensively with recycled and reclaimed materials. “It’s not just that you’re not using a new thing. It’s about saving an old thing from death and bringing it back to life.”

Anyone who has walked by a work site knows that construction generates waste: a Dumpster full of wood scraps and carpet pieces is a normal sight. And if an old structure has to be torn down before a new one is built, even more trash is generated. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, building construction generates 170 million tons of waste annually – almost 60 percent of the nation’s nonindustrial solid waste.

Over the past decade, however, more and more builders and homeowners are finding ways to take what would be trash and turn it into treasure.

‘Re-building’ options

Mike Baylor said that from doors to windows to light fixtures, Habitat for Humanity ReStores see thousands of items come through their doors rather than into landfills every year. Across the nation, Habitat ReStores and other re-building centers are part of a growing network of places where contractors can drop off their leftovers, and bargain hunters can come search for secondhand building materials.

“You see a lot of fun stuff come and go,” Baylor said.

The EPA estimates that more than 1,200 re-building stores are in operation nationwide. The Albany ReStore celebrated its 10th year in business in March. Baylor said the Albany store alone has saved more than a million pounds of building material from the landfill.

Metzger said that consumers in the environmentally conscious Pacific Northwest are especially receptive to the idea of using reclaimed and recycled materials. He’s been in business five years and in the construction industry for 15 years, and he said he’s seen a continued growth in the use of reclaimed and recycled materials.

Metzger said that he often looks for reusable pieces on the job. For instance, paperstone, a Corian-like solid surface counter top material, can only be sold by the piece, and he often sees excess chunks of it.

“The leftover piece from one person’s kitchen counter might become someone else’s small bathroom vanity,” he said.

Deconstruction

Of course, it’s not always that easy.

“The trouble is warehousing. You can’t necessarily just take it from one job to another. You have to have a place to keep it, and that’s the challenge, getting it from point A to point B,” he said.

What’s more, it takes time to pick through old structures in a process called deconstruction – more time and manpower than it does to bring in heavy machinery and smash it to bits.

“There is an embodied energy involved in getting it back in as a second or third life,” Metzger said.

But when it does happen, the traces of those previous lives can add value to the reclaimed product.

Chris Vitello, owner of the EarthSmart store in Corvallis, sells many items that used to be something else, from insulation made of shredded blue jeans to furniture made of old barn wood. He said that some customers come in looking for reclaimed and recycled materials mainly for environmental reasons, while others want something more.

For instance, the furniture made from old barn wood – it’s not just any barn wood, but wood from a barn in Brownsville, a barn that, legend has it, once contained buried treasure. You can still see the original sawmill marks on the boards that make up the chairs.

“It’s a local story,” he said. “There’s a connection to the product. And when you tell people about the products, they just love the story.”

Metzger said that materials can come from anywhere – flooring from old gymnasiums, wood from sunken bays in the Philippines, barrels from Jack Daniels distilleries in Kentucky. “When you use something like that, it becomes this huge conversation piece,” he said.

He’s currently working on making furniture out of old wine and whisky barrels. “They’re still perfectly great pieces of wood,” he said. “The smell is almost overwhelming, and it’s this deep wine purple. It’s a very tactile experience to work with.”

Read the rest of the article here

via Give building materials another go.

Columbus Local News: > Archives > Region > News > Builder’s piecemeal approach to demolition spares landfill

Connor Matrka carries wood from the roof of his father Mike Matrka’s Upper Arlington house, where he’ll pull nails and stack it with other salvaged planks. Connor Matrka and his family are working together to demolish the house.

Upper Arlington builder Mike Matrka and his son Danny are aiming to go where few builders have gone before.

Having purchased a house at 2800 Edington Road in November, Mike Matrka plans to build three houses on the site, including one for him and his wife, after the existing structure is torn down.

But rather than hire another company to demolish the house quickly, Matrka and his crew are taking their time with the demolition to salvage, recycle and reuse as much material as possible.

Most of the recovered lumber, stone and metal is being donated to Habitat for Humanity. Some will be incorporated in the new houses.

When a building is torn down, most of the debris usually ends up in a dump or landfill, Matrka said.

“It’s always bugged me,” he said. “I’ve always felt a responsibility to be as efficient as possible.”

While a demolition company can tear down a building in a matter of days, this deconstruction is taking eight weeks.

“It seems like we’re always trying to go faster and faster, and I’m not totally convinced that’s always the best case,” Matrka said. “It’s my own personal project so no one can yell at me for taking too long.”

Danny Matrka, 24, is leading the crew, which includes his brother, Connor. Danny Matrka, a Dublin resident, said he embraced the idea when his father first discussed it.

“As a society, we waste a ton of stuff,” Danny Matrka said. “Instead of that being dumped, you get to see it live on in a new way.”

Mike Matrka, who spent nearly 30 years in the construction business, called the project an “experiment.”

“I don’t know if anybody’s done it before,” he said. “We’re documenting the journey.”

Danny Matrka is filming every aspect of the project, charting the progress to show others what they’re doing, what works and what doesn’t.

He also filmed Kiel Mohrman of Modern Farm Furniture receiving some wood and turning it into new furniture. That sequence embodies what the project is about, he said.

He added he plans to edit the footage into a documentary.

“We’ll see how that turns out,” he said.

Among the companies assisting with the project are the Linworth Lumber Co., which is lending its trucks and banding machine to bundle the lumber, and Wholesale Stone Supplies, which is storing the stones.

Mike Matrka said the companies he’s worked with have been encouraging.

“They think I’m a nut, but they’re curious,” he said. “You get these people I’ve worked with jumping in to help.”

From the outside, the project might not make sense financially, he said, but he won’t know the final cost until everything is complete.

“It might not make any sense at the end of the day, but sometimes you don’t know until you try it,” he said.

via Columbus Local News: > Archives > Region > News > Builder’s piecemeal approach to demolition spares landfill.

Man wants Casper building to deconstruct – WY

CASPER, Wyo. — Dave Bennink wants to break your building down.

He’d like to tear out the sheet rock and remove the cabinets. He might take the floor, too.

For two decades, Bennink has been trying to change how people get rid of buildings. Most old structures are simply torn down; their guts dumped into a landfill. He advocates deconstructing buildings piece by piece, salvaging as much material as possible.

“So by the time you save everything that is reuseable and recycle all of the other stuff, only 10 to 15 percent goes in the landfill,” he said.

In September, Bennink will be teaching a course on deconstruction at Casper College. But first, he needs a building for his students to practice their new skills.

The Bellingham, Wash., consultant is hoping someone in the Casper area has a building they want torn down. He doesn’t need a big house. A garage or barn will work. He’d even settle for an office in need of a remodel.

Instead of simply demolishing the structure, his students will deconstruct it.

“In doing so, we generate material that is reusable,” he said. “So we are not going to take it down and just throw it away. We are going to take it down and give it away.”

The work won’t cost the building’s owner anything.

Much of the material that makes up a typical house can be recycled or reused. Kitchen cabinets and doors can be removed and installed in new buildings. Wood beams can be cut and used as flooring.

Even asphalt shingles and carpet pads can find new life in another structure.

“It is worth the trouble of processing it,” Bennink said.

Besides keeping trash out of landfills, deconstructing buildings also provides affordable building materials.

The vast majority of today’s buildings are demolished rather than deconstructed. Demolition is generally quicker and requires less labor, translating to lower costs.

But interest in deconstruction is growing because it’s better for the environment and creates more jobs, advocates say. The industry is also trying to become more economically competitive with traditional demolition.

Casper College is offering the two-week deconstruction class through a grant that promotes training for green construction and sustainable energy installation, said Sarah Olson, a workforce training specialist with the college’s Center for Training and Development.

In the future, waste management codes are expected to require contractors to recycle a larger percentage of materials from buildings that are torn down, Olson said. Workers and business owners who receive the training will have a head start when the change happens.

“We want people to be ahead of the game and to have those skills,” she said.

Copyright 2011 The Billings Gazette. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Posted in Wyoming on Monday, August 1, 2011 11:45 pm Updated: 11:45 pm. | Tags: Deve Bennink, Deconstruction, Building Salvage, Casper College, Sarah Olson, Center For Training Development

via Man wants Casper building to deconstruct.

Youths learn salvage through an old-fashioned barn razing | The Ithaca Journal | theithacajournal.com

Thirteen-year-olds P.J. Rausch-Moran, left and Francesca Merrick, right, from the Greater Ithaca Activities Center Summer Conservation Corps program, get instruction from Erich Kruger of Finger Lakes ReUse on how to remove difficult embedded nails as the building recycling takes down an old barn Monday in Fall Creek.

Thirteen-year-olds P.J. Rausch-Moran, left and Francesca Merrick, right, from the Greater Ithaca Activities Center Summer Conservation Corps program, get instruction from Erich Kruger of Finger Lakes ReUse on how to remove difficult embedded nails as the building recycling takes down an old barn Monday in Fall Creek. / SIMON WHEELER / STAFF PHOTOS

 

Instead of blue jeans and green Greater Ithaca Activities Center Conservation Corps T-shirts, Susan Cosentini thought they should wear red capes and blue shorts like Superman.

She suggested this wardrobe change to eight 13-year-olds who were taking apart two old barns on Aurora Street Monday afternoon. The barns, which Cosentini owns, were being dismantled and salvaged to make way for three new sustainable homes to be built on-site.

“Basically, you people are the change agents in the world,” she said to the group of students. “I will be dead when the benefit of all this starts to happen, so hopefully you and your children will benefit from it. By working here today, you are saving the world.”

Finger Lakes ReUse teamed up with the GIAC Summer Conservation Corps to take down the barns and salvage the building materials. Then, Cosentini’s New Earth Living LLC will build The Aurora Dwelling Circle in place of the barns.

The dwelling circle will be made up of one three-bedroom unit and two two-bedroom units, Cosentini said. The theme throughout the whole project, she said, is sustainability.

“We are recycling the materials from the barns, and then using the space to build houses that will hardly use any fossil fuels whatsoever to heat and cool,” she said. “Almost (all) of the landscape will be edible, people will share resources. This is going to be the new paradigm.”

Property owner Susan Cosentini talks to the 13-year-olds in the Greater Ithaca Activities Center Summer Conservation Corps program about her plans to redevelop the space around her home on Aurora Street in the Fall Creek neighborhood.  The youth were working with Finger Lakes ReUse to disassemble the old barns on the property.

Property owner Susan Cosentini talks to the 13-year-olds in the Greater Ithaca Activities Center Summer Conservation Corps program about her plans to redevelop the space around her home on Aurora Street in the Fall Creek neighborhood. The youth were working with Finger Lakes ReUse to disassemble the old barns on the property.

Read the entire article here

via Youths learn salvage through an old-fashioned barn razing | The Ithaca Journal | theithacajournal.com.

Habitat for Humanity takes apart a house for supplies | St. Cloud TIMES | sctimes.com – MN

Volunteer Jessica Chapin moves a ladder inside a house Saturday that is being deconstructed for Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore. The Sartell home’s pieces will be sold at ReStore and profits will go to Habitat for Humanity.

Volunteer Jessica Chapin moves a ladder inside a house Saturday that is being deconstructed for Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore. The Sartell home’s pieces will be sold at ReStore and profits will go to Habitat for Humanity. / Kaitlin Keane, kkeane@stcloudtimes.com

 

 

“It’s a pilot program,” Ferguson said. “We’re still in the very infant stages.”

The deconstruction will provide ReStore with many materials. Ferguson said it is an older home, which usually has higher quality materials, but this particular house was also updated so it has good windows and doors for resale. Deconstructions generally provide better quality materials than donations, Ferguson said, and she hopes the St. Cloud ReStore will have more deconstruction opportunities in the future.

via Habitat for Humanity takes apart a house for supplies | St. Cloud TIMES | sctimes.com.

Six residents get certificates in Hamden in deconstructing old buildings – Life – Post-Chronicle

HAMDEN — After nine weeks of training, six formerly unemployed adults are on their way to making a new livelihood with a new way of doing business.

It’s called deconstruction, and the concept is carefully to take down, not tear down, buildings so that materials can be saved and reused.

 

The Workforce Alliance provided a $49,500 grant that paid for tuition and materials to Gateway, and DeRisi taught the class once a week at the M.L. Keefe Community Center.

McCullough and Blakeslee said they were in the construction field previously.

“I was out of work for 2½ years. I really enjoyed it,” McCullough said of learning the new skill. “You can save 95 percent of the materials, and they’re reusable.”

See video here

 

via Six residents get certificates in Hamden in deconstructing old buildings – Life – Post-Chronicle.

Habitat for Humanity salvages items from Dexter Village house slated for demolition

Tim_Raquet_Habitat_Dexter.JPG

Tim Raquet of Dexter, an employee of Habitat for Humanity, removes aluminum from a village-owned home. The removed pieces will be sold to benefit the organization.

“There’s a really nice ceiling fan and cabinets inside,” Tamoshunas said. Neither of the men were sure how much the items would net for the nonprofit organization, which sells reusable materials to benefit its programs.

“We just tear it apart,” Raquet said. “Other people put price tags on it.”

Allison Bishop, director of community development, said she contacted Habitat about the house as a way to reuse whatever the organization could find useful.

Paul_Tamoshunas_Habitat_Dexter.JPG

Paul Tamoshunas of Ann Arbor removes salvageable pieces while on the roof of the Forest Street home.

 

via Habitat for Humanity salvages items from Dexter Village house slated for demolition.

Local News | Seattle program training workers in deconsruction | Seattle Times Newspaper

 

Marlena Sessions, chief executive officer of the Workforce Development Council of Seattle-King County, said the program has trained 50 students to date, of which 40 are already employed. The highest salary so far is $25 per hour while the lower range is around $10. Students were previously not working or were under-employed.

“Even in light of the Great Recession, there are opportunities out there so we need to match employers’ needs,” she said. “When you have these people working, all becoming taxpayers, it stands to reason it will help us all by getting them trained for new jobs and new careers.”

In total, the deconstruction program will train 130 people. Three classes have been completed since January and four more are planned throughout the summer.

 

 

 

via Local News | Seattle program training workers in deconsruction | Seattle Times Newspaper.

Bank of America Donating Vacant Properties to Help Fight Blight

 

 

Bank of America will contribute towards the cost of demolishing or deconstructing any deteriorating buildings. Similar plans have been previously announced in Detroit and Chicago as Bank of America addresses the problems caused by a growing inventory of abandoned and uninhabitable properties.

“Unfortunately, many homeowners faced with unemployment, underemployment and other economic hardships have transitioned to alternative housing situations, and in many cases have walked away from their homes, leaving behind vacant and deteriorating properties that can cause neighborhood blight,” said Rebecca Mairone, national mortgage outreach executive for Bank of America Home Loans.

via Bank of America Donating Vacant Properties to Help Fight Blight.

Buffalo ReUse deals with renewed strife – City & Region – The Buffalo News

 

 

Board members say they have made tough economic decisions to remain viable but haven’t abandoned ReUse’s principles.

“We are getting a handle on things that were financial and management stresses in the organization for some time,” said Vincent Kuntz, ReUse’s president. “Clearly, there are some who didn’t agree with how the board was doing it, but we are quite confident we are in a stronger position than before.”

Added board member Michelle Johnson: “I feel very confident, and I haven’t for a very long time.”

Some former staffers say things were dire before they left.

The financial picture was so bleak by early May that staff didn’t know if the ReUse store would be open from one day to the next, said Cerrina Bower, former assistant store manager.

 

ReUse’s debt approached $100,000, Hayes said.

via Buffalo ReUse deals with renewed strife – City & Region – The Buffalo News.

Green Job Training Targets Big Cities | EarthTechling

 

Green job training in Boston, Chicago, Detroit, Milwaukee, Philadelphia, Seattle, and Washington D.C. is about to be significantly expanded with the $8M grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Labor to Jobs for the Future, a nonprofit education and workforce development organization.

The GreenWays Initiative will focus on developing skills for training green collar workers in 4 specific areas: green building construction, auto technology, manufacturing, and utilities.

 

Because of the large number of abandoned and foreclosed properties, green building projects – from deconstruction to energy efficient building – will be the primary focus in Detroit where 2,000 green building jobs are expected to be added in the next five years.  Washington D.C. funds will also focus on green building and green construction knowledge specifically weatherization and insulation, green roof maintenance, solar panel installation, green building maintenance, green cement masonry, and helper and apprentice positions with 17 construction unions.

via Green Job Training Targets Big Cities | EarthTechling.

Deconstruction of old homes reaches new diversion levels with a little planning and technology

 

The home had many layers of lead paint and asbestos which required abatement. Once that was complete, Greenworx began the deconstruction of the home, starting with the roof and working their way down to dirt. Each material was sorted and source separated to achieve the maximum purity of individual materials for recycling and reuse. That is something that cannot be done with traditional tear down demolition. The project generated a total of 162.7 tons of material, of which 130.16 tons were recycled and salvaged, achieving a diversion rate of 81.29% on the project.

via Deconstruction of old homes reaches new diversion levels with a little planning and technology.

JLLs DC Construction Team Counts 1,233 Tons of Recycled Building Materials – Citybizlist Washington DC

Construction professionals at Jones Lang LaSalle recycled more than 72 percent of all building material waste from new construction, renovation and tenant fit-out projects in the Washington, DC area in 2010.Across the 42 projects monitored last year, 1,233 tons of construction waste was recycled, including 302 tons of metal, 165 tons of wood and 313 tons of drywall gypsum.Jones Lang LaSalles DC Construction team created a program in 2009 to monitor building waste and to divert as much waste as possible from landfills by reusing it in another application or otherwise recycling it.

via JLLs DC Construction Team Counts 1,233 Tons of Recycled Building Materials – Citybizlist Washington DC.

Boeing Plant Camouflaged Beneath a Fake Neighborhood Tapped as Salvaged Lumber Source | Inhabitat – Green Design Will Save the World

Boeing Plant 2, eco lumber, Duluth Timber Company, FSC certified wood beams, Seattle deconstruct, green building, salvaged lumber yard, deconstruction, green lumber, green materials, reclaimed lumber, salvaged lumber

South of downtown Seattle is an old Boeing airplane assembly plant that produced nearly 7000 Flying Fortresses while hidden beneath a roof with a fake suburban neighborhood on top. The site is now the source for a huge lumber salvage operation – Duluth Timber Company is now deconstructing the 1.7 million square foot facility and reclaiming the lumber for real homes. The beauty of reclaimed lumber is not just in its quality and size but in its history – and the 1/4 million board feet that will come out of this deconstruction has a lot of tales to tell.

via Green design will save the world | Inhabitat – Part 2.

Centennial Woods Has Reclaimed and Repurposed Over 5 Million Feet of Fence | Inhabitat – Green Design Will Save the World

centennial woods, reclaimed fences, reclaimed materials, recycled materials, snow fence, green building, green materials, green products, green design, eco design, sustainable design, eco products, recycled products

Centennial Woods reclaims wood from snow fences across Wyoming and sells the sustainable harvested wood for both interior and exterior applications. The wood is a stunning mixture of grays and browns in unique grain patterns that are characteristic of the windblown state of Wyoming. The company has repurposed more than 5 million feet of snow fence, saving snow fence owners more than $9 million and avoiding more than 9,000 tons of CO2 emissions. Unlike other reclaimed woods, Centennial Woods’ have never been painted or chemically treated, and are completely free of lead and other hazardous treatments common in older barns and other structures.

via Centennial Woods Has Reclaimed and Repurposed Over 5 Million Feet of Fence | Inhabitat – Green Design Will Save the World.

RN-T.com – Habitat volunteers salvage items from 2 FMC buildings – Southern US

Ed Cescutti, Habitat for Humanity, takes a gutter off a building at the intersection of West 5th Street and North 4th Avenue on Thursday. Habitat for Humanity is salvaging building materials from two buildings on the Floyd Medical Center Campus. (Ryan Smith, RN-T.com)

Ed Cescutti, Habitat for Humanity, takes a gutter off a building at the intersection of West 5th Street and North 4th Avenue on Thursday. Habitat for Humanity is salvaging building materials from two buildings on the Floyd Medical Center Campus. (Ryan Smith, RN-T.com)

 

Two vacant buildings set to be demolished turned into something that will benefit countless people.

For nearly a week, volunteers from Rome-Floyd Habitat for Humanity have salvaged building items from two buildings owned by Floyd Medical Center on the corner of North Fourth Avenue and West Fifth Street.

via RN-T.com – Habitat volunteers salvage items from 2 FMC buildings.

Juana Briones House in Palo Alto coming down piece by piece – San Jose Mercury News

Palo Alto’s oldest residence is being taken apart “brick by brick, board by board,” to the dismay of history buffs who have long fought to save it.

The dismantling of the Juana Briones House began Friday, said Kent Mitchell, a lawyer for the property’s owners. He said the city last week reinstated a demolition permit on hold since its issuance in 2007 due to a legal challenge by preservationists.

“For people who have been involved, it’s sad news,” said Scott Smithwick, president of the Palo Alto Stanford Heritage preservation group. “Not unexpected, but sad.”

Briones, a successful rancher and businesswoman, built the home at 4155 Old Adobe Road in the 1840s. The city initially fought plans by current owners Jaim Nulman and Avelyn Welczer to demolish the historic structure. The Friends of the Juana Briones House then took up the fight but ultimately lost when the California Supreme Court refused to hear its appeal of a lower court’s ruling favoring the owners.

 

 

via Juana Briones House in Palo Alto coming down piece by piece – San Jose Mercury News.

Home deconstruction: Can an entire house be recycled? – CSMonitor.com Kansas

 

Jack Williams and Jane York had their Kansas home ‘deconstructed’ and the materials resold or reused.

Photos courtesy of Jack Williams

Construction and demolition debris take up more than one-third of landfill space annually, but on average, more than 60 percent of a house – and in some cases, more than 75 percent – could be reused or recycled, says Bradley Guy, who researches architecture and deconstruction at The Catholic University of America.

“Deconstruction, although it’s difficult to do, offers a lot of opportunities,” says Jesse White, creator of deconstructioninstitute.com and owner of an architectural salvage store in Sarasota, Fla.

via Home deconstruction: Can an entire house be recycled? – CSMonitor.com.

Deconstruction vs. Demolition : Mike J. Gold’s Blog

Deconstruction vs. Demolition

May 20, 2011 by Mike Gold · Leave a Comment

According to the National Association of Home Builders, about 245,000 homes and apartments are demolished every year, generating 74 million tons of waste. This construction and demolition (C&D) waste includes concrete, wood, brick, asphalt, metals, glass, and typically ends up in landfills. But by deconstructing instead of demolishing these homes and apartments, much of these materials can be put to good use.

Home deconstruction is the process of taking a building apart with the intention of salvaging all or part of the materials – and it’s a growing movement in the building industry. Deconstruction not only makes it possible to reuse materials, it also has these “green” benefits:

It reduces greenhouse gases, as well as noise pollution

Cuts the amount of materials going to a landfill

Exposes the possibility of unforeseen hazardous waste

Creates jobs

Homes that make the best candidates for deconstruction are either older homes that contain high-quality materials like old-growth lumber and hand-crafted moldings or new houses with modern, high-performance features, like energy-efficient windows.

If you would like more information about deconstruction, contact Habitat ReStores at habitat.org/env.restore.html, the Institute for Local Self-Reliance at ilsr.org or ask for referrals at your local recycling center.

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via Deconstruction vs. Demolition : Mike J. Gold’s Blog.

Colcord Hall Deconstruction | New Hampshire

 

 

Materials that are salvaged will be brought to Southeast New Hampshire Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore, located in Dover, and will be sold to benefit the building of future Habitat for Humanity homes. The fee paid to Habitat for Humanity for the deconstruction will also be used to fund future and current Habitat for Humanity projects.

In addition to helping build Habitat houses, the average deconstruction also salvages 60 percent to 90 percent of the materials, vastly reducing the amount of waste that ends up in a landfill. To finish the massive project, Southeast New Hampshire Habitat for Humanity is aiming to have a crew of up to 20 volunteers to work on site for four or five days each week. The crews will be led by an experienced builder who has built hundreds of homes and renovated hundreds more.

 

via Colcord Hall Deconstruction | SeacoastOnline.com.

Delaware charity: Fixtures from never-opened hotel go to Habitat for Humanity | The News Journal | delawareonline.com

Reclaimed fixtures to benefit Habitat for Humanity

The long-embroiled, twice-sold but never-opened Radisson hotel near New Castle this week took a new role — salvage site.

Habitat for Humanity is salvaging never-used material in the longtime white elephant from sinks to lights in its 193 rooms and halls.

“It’s like a ghost ship,” said Brian Cunningham, spokesman for nonprofit Habitat for Humanity of New Castle County.

 

Four questions for a pro: Jessie White of Sarasota Architectural Salvage | HeraldTribune.com (Florida)

I found this article on my daily morning news hunt. I just posted the question I thought the most interesting, but the article itself is only okay.  I am encouraged to see more companies being created around building salvage (especially in Florida!!).  I will always post these types of news bits.  To see all four questions use the article link below.  Enjoy!

Jesse White, owner of Sarasota Architectural Salvage, in the “Side Yard” of his Central Avenue business. His company provides used building materials and other items reclaimed from deconstructed buildings. STAFF PHOTO / HAROLD BUBIL

Q:How do you get jobs doing architectural recycling work?

A:Our contacts are builders, home owners and demolition contractors, and we are called to go into a building and pull out anything of value before it gets knocked down.

We recently got our license to do demolition ourselves, so I’m hoping we will get contracts, and, in the process, save 20 to 40 percent of the building by doing a whole-house deconstruction.

via Four questions for a pro: Jessie White of Sarasota Architectural Salvage | HeraldTribune.com.