Category Archives: Maritime Deconstruction

Rusting 1950s cargo ship transformed into a stunning modern floating home | Inhabitat 

Unlike most ship and barge conversions, this transformation eliminated the linear system of spaces and offers several sight lines that run the entire length of the ship and across different floors.

Source: Rusting 1950s cargo ship transformed into a stunning modern floating home | Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

From Seaport shipwreck to fancy furniture: Charlestown woodworker repurposes scraps – The Boston Globe

J. DICKEY Conference table made from the boards of Seaport shipwreck.

On Aug. 11, Dickey will display furniture he made using wood from the historic ship during an event at District Hall, a Seaport venue on Northern Avenue not far from where the vessel’s remains were uncovered. He’ll also share with the public pieces of the ship that weren’t transformed into furniture, offering history buffs and boat enthusiasts a chance to get up close and inspect the leftovers. “All the pieces of the ship will be represented,” he said. “Any person with knowledge in ship-building and sailing will get to see how they originally put this ship together.”

Source: From Seaport shipwreck to fancy furniture: Charlestown woodworker repurposes scraps – The Boston Globe

Urban Lumber plans to grow outward from Springfield | Business | Eugene, Oregon

“We’re used to big trees,” he said. “Some people don’t even know that walnut trees get that big.”

He also found ways to access material from old wooden buildings — and facilities like the University of Oregon’s old tennis courts — and even from the sea.

One stack of wood stored in his factory, waiting to be transformed, is from World War II cargo ships that had been deliberately sunk in Newport harbor after the war as part of a pier.

Seth San Filippo, owner of Urban Lumber, has moved into a new larger location in the old Booth Kelly Mill in Springfield. (Brian Davies/The Register-Guard)

via Urban Lumber plans to grow outward from Springfield | Business | Eugene, Oregon.

Boating Business – Recycling Conference speakers confirmed

Speaker and panellists at the conference will present their experiences and lead debates on the subject of End-of-Life Boats (ELBs)Speaker and panellists at the conference will present their experiences and lead debates on the subject of End-of-Life Boats (ELBs)

Taking place at RAI Amsterdam on Monday 16 November, speakers and panellists at the conference will present their experiences and lead debates on the subject of End-of-Life Boats (ELBs) and how their growing numbers can be practically dealt with in the coming years.

via Boating Business – Recycling Conference speakers confirmed.

The Future of Yacht Recycling >> Scuttlebutt Sailing News

2015-08-14_16-00-11

More recently a study carried out by ICOMIA (The International Council of Marine Industry Associations) has estimated that there are more than 6 million recreational craft in Europe alone. This also revealed that historically, disposal methods have been crude, and generally involve chopping up composite structures and reducing them to fragments that can be sent to landfill, which is considered unsustainable in the long run. So again, recycling is the only realistic option for the future…

via The Future of Yacht Recycling >> Scuttlebutt Sailing News.

Pier A Restoration and Adaptive Reuse in NYC to be honored

Pier A after restoration. Photograph by Edward Hueber/archphoto

“This structure, the oldest functioning pier in New York City, sat vacant and deteriorating for three decades,” said Jay DiLorenzo, President of the Preservation League. “Built in 1886 at the tip of Lower Manhattan, it was once a command center for the bustling harbor traffic on the Hudson River. But its floor plan, based on its original use as administrative offices for government agencies, presented significant challenges for adaptive reuse as a public gathering space. As so much of New York’s maritime heritage is threatened, this rehabilitation demonstrates how the city can both embrace the historic waterfront’s history and give it new life, while preparing for the challenges of a changing coastal environment.”

via Pier A Restoration and Adaptive Reuse in NYC to be honored.

Lawmaker wants to upcycle retired aircraft carriers into Puget Sound toll bridge | MNN – Mother Nature Network

Will Bremerton, the town best known for blackberries and naval base, be home to an inlet-spanning bridge fashioned from decommissioned warships? (Photo: Clemens Vasters/flickr)

What hasn’t been done before — and what Young is pitching via a proposed $90,000 feasibility study recently introduced into the state highway budget — is a floating bridge built entirely from repurposed Vietnam-era aircraft carriers. Channeling Xerxes, Young envisions a string (well, just three) of these retired — mothballed, technically — Navy vessels, each a little over 1,000-feet-long, spanning Sinclair Inlet.

via Lawmaker wants to upcycle retired aircraft carriers into Puget Sound toll bridge | MNN – Mother Nature Network.

Solar-assisted, volcanic-composite sailing yacht navigating world’s toughest waters

The Fipofix Open 16 out on the water putting Fipofix's specially processed volcanic fiber-...

Austrian company Fipofix believes that it’s identified a material better-suited to the high seas, saying that its specially processed volcanic fiber-based composite, more commonly known as basalt fiber, offers a better performance-price ratio than carbon fiber or fiberglass and can be recycled after use.

via Solar-assisted, volcanic-composite sailing yacht navigating world’s toughest waters.

Meet Viridian Reclaimed Wood – YouTube

Most people think of reclaimed wood from old barns and schoolhouses. Our story was born in 2004 down at the shipyard, with a lot of grit and a couple of friends’ idea to rescue some really amazing wood from winding up in a landfill. Wood from far off ports arrives daily as shipping pallets and crates, but it’s extremely difficult to recycle. Through years of trial and error we pioneered a method for up-cycling these dockside discards into products with lasting value.

This video explains the why, how and what we do to make the most of every stick of wood we reclaim.

via Meet Viridian Reclaimed Wood – YouTube.

Floating on Dry Land: 17 Derelict Houseboats Find New Home | Urbanist

ceuvel project lifting place

The complex is made up of an array of formerly-floating homes that are no longer seaworthy but can still be fixed up and find a second life on land. As PopUpCity reports, “The imaginatively retro-fitted houseboats that make up the creative quarter are all placed around a winding bamboo walkway and the surrounding landscape consists of plants that clean the soil.”

 

Café de Ceuvel – Crowdfunding from Café de Ceuvel on Vimeo.

via Floating on Dry Land: 17 Derelict Houseboats Find New Home | Urbanist.

Op-Ed: Minimizing Scrap and Creating Jobs in a Milwaukee River Restoration – Next City

Thanks to Ruth Trocolli the archaeologist for the District of Columbia Historic Preservation Office, for this gem of an article.

The Kinnickinnic River in Milwaukee.

Maher hopes to put his new skills to work and continue deconstruction work in the area. He has learned that it is possible to efficiently take a structure apart, salvaging valuable materials and greatly reducing what goes to the landfill. As the construction sector of the economy rebounds, the success of the Kinnickinnic River project could encourage less traditional demolition and greater use of deconstruction techniques.

“If things can be reused and we can keep things out of landfill,” Maher says, “why not put the materials to use?”

The Partnership for Working Families, a grantee of the Surdna Foundation, is a national network of leading regional advocacy organizations who support innovative solutions to our nation’s economic and environmental problems.

via Op-Ed: Minimizing Scrap and Creating Jobs in a Milwaukee River Restoration – Next City.

Four More Shipbreaking Workers Die in Bangladesh | Environment News Service

Before dying one of the workers alerted his family and the yard managers of the accident via his mobile phone. The families rushed to the yard, but found the gates locked.

“One of the survivors told me that he could have saved at least two of the workers if the yard had provided them with oxygen. Instead, the yard management wanted to hide the bodies,” said Ali Shahin. “The families, who had been alerted of the accident, finally managed to break the gates of the yard. But it was, unfortunately, too late to save the workers.”

Zakir Hossain, deputy inspector general of the Department of Inspection for Safeties of Shops and Establishments, told the newspaper, “Our inspector visited the factory and found the accident had occurred due to negligence. We will serve a notice on the owner.”

Shipbreaking involves the dismantling of old ships for scrap recycling of their steel and other equipment on board.

Around one million tonnes of steel are dismantled in Bangladeshi shipyards every year. The country’s shipbreaking industry  provides direct and indirect employment for about 200,000 people.

via Four More Shipbreaking Workers Die in Bangladesh | Environment News Service.

Ship-breaking hurts Bangladesh’s fragile coasts – SciDev.Net South Asia

“On top of this irreparable damage, we also face massive loss of marine life,” says Matin. “Fish are often seen floating up dead in the surrounding sea, and fresh water around the coastal areas of Sitakunda contains many toxic chemicals.”

Formalised in 2006, the industry had by 2012 allowed Bangladesh to recover an estimated 1.5 million tonnes of steel. At the same time, according to the study, thousands of tonnes of toxic substances such as asbestos, lead, waste oil and other chemicals were discharged into the soil and sea.

via Ship-breaking hurts Bangladesh’s fragile coasts – SciDev.Net South Asia.

Notes from the Field: The Atlantic Workshop | New England Home Magazine

This reclaimed wooden boat chair masterpiece came from Scott Feen of The Atlantic Workshop. We found it through Unconsumption – one of the most inspiring sites on reuse design on the web.

Photos by Karin Lidbeck Brent

Within his workshop you will find remnants of boats, buildings, factories, barns and mechanical equipment most would toss into a scrap yard. But Scottâ philosophy is simple: find old items and give them new life.

The Chatham location of his workshop lends itself especially well to the uncovering of pieces of old boats and yachts, which Scott uses to create furniture with a nautical theme.

via Notes from the Field: The Atlantic Workshop | New England Home Magazine.

Visit An Incredible Winery Built Out Of Abandoned Boats | Gizmodo Australia

Visit an Incredible Winery Built Out of Abandoned Boats

The project was designed by Alejandro D’Acosta and Claudia Turrent, a husband & wife architecture team, based locally in Baja, who are known for their inventive approach to reuse, which includes everything from rammed earth to reclaimed trash. At Vena Cava, the duo salvaged a handful of discarded boats from a nearby port and turned them into vaulted ceilings for the winery’s essential functions.

Visit an Incredible Winery Built Out of Abandoned Boats

via Visit An Incredible Winery Built Out Of Abandoned Boats | Gizmodo Australia.

The Blood Harvest – Alexis C. Madrigal – The Atlantic

Horseshoe Crab – one of my favorite animals. Had no idea this was happening. Wish I still didn’t 🙁

A still from the PBS Nature documentary Crash ( PBS )

I don’t know about you, but the idea that every single person in America who has ever had an injection has been protected because we harvest the blood of a forgettable sea creature with a hidden chemical superpower makes me feel a little bit crazy. This scenario is not even sci-fi, it’s postmodern technology.

The only problem is that the companies need a large supply of the blood of live crabs. Horseshoe crabs live on the seafloor, near the shore. When they want to mate, they swim into very shallow water, and horseshoe crab collectors wade along, snatching the crabs out of their habitat.

Horseshoe crab harvest for fertilizer production, 1928 (Delaware Public Archives)

via The Blood Harvest – Alexis C. Madrigal – The Atlantic.

Historic Large-Dimension Ocean Salvage Timbers

The Canadian Exporter Breaks in Half 1921 Copyright Columbia River Maritime Museum

The Canadian Exporter Breaks in Half 1921 Copyright Columbia River Maritime Museum

Some of the most intriguing lumber we have in stock was never used in construction, and yet still considered salvage timbers.  These beams are believed to have been loaded onto a Canadian ship in 1921 that wrecked off the Pacific Coast.

In early 2010 as a beach near the wreck eroded, the shipwreck became exposed and the cargo began washing ashore. The Canadian Exporter was carrying 3 million board feet of lumber plus 200 tons of other cargo, heading from Vancouver, British Columbia to Portland, Oregon and then on to Asia, according to a story in the Seattle Times.   Some of the timbers that Crossroads and our sister company, Pacific Northwest Timbers now have in inventory were found by locals and hauled ashore with a tow truck, a few others were discovered just beneath the waters’ surface by a local oyster fisherman.

Timber Cargo of the Canadian Exporter Now at Crossroads Lumber and PNT

via Historic Large-Dimension Ocean Salvage Timbers.

A Hong Kong Apothecary Made from Reclaimed Ship’s Wood: Remodelista

Ooh La La! Two of my favorite things – reclaimed ship wood and gorgeous pictures of it.  Check out Remodelista for the rest of the story (and amazing photos).

Aesop, Canton Road Hong Kong, Old Boat Plank Cabinets | Remodelista

Using reclaimed ship wood, Chinese/German architecture firm Cheungvogl created a one-of-a-kind installation for the Aesop shop on Canton Road in Hong Kong.

Aesop, Canton Road Hong Kong, Old Boat Plank Cabinets | Remodelista

Aesop, Canton Road Hong Kong, Old Boat Plank Cabinets | Remodelista

via A Hong Kong Apothecary Made from Reclaimed Ship’s Wood: Remodelista.

Get ready to put your Christmas trees curbside, Jefferson, Orleans parishes | NOLA.com

wb_xmarsh5.jpg

PHOTO BY SUSAN POAG

Collin Stedman, a ninth grade student at St. Martin’s Episcopal School, who was volunteering with his entire ninth grade class, helps Randy Majoria, an enivironmental quality specialist with Jefferson Parish, line one of the fences with Christmas trees in the marsh near Goose Bayou in Jean Lafitte,LA Friday, January 11, 2008. Recycled Christmas trees are places in the marsh as part of the Jefferson Parish Christmas Tree Marsh Restoration Project to help restore the wetlands.

via Get ready to put your Christmas trees curbside, Jefferson, Orleans parishes | NOLA.com.

Dvelas Reclaims Worn Boat Sails and Transforms them into Unique Loungers | Inhabitat – Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building

Dvelas Reclaimed Sail Chair, Dvelas, Reclaimed Sails, Eco Chair, Green Furniture

Handmade in Spain using recycled sails from around the world, each of design studio Dvelas‘ chairs is a unique expression carrying its own history on the sea.

The goal of Dvelas is to recover these used sails and give them new life and a new history through design.

via Dvelas Reclaims Worn Boat Sails and Transforms them into Unique Loungers | Inhabitat – Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building.

Larry Ellison Is Recycling An America’s Cup Yacht For Science – Business Insider

Oracle Team USA America's Cup AC72 Sailboat San Francisco Bay 2013 1

Oracle and Boeing are collaborating to recycle 7,000 pounds of carbon fiber from Oracle’s USA-71 boat. They say this is “a first-of-its-kind effort for what will likely be the largest carbon structure ever recycled,” according to Boeing’s press release.

While carbon fiber has become a popular material used for all kinds of things, bikes, cars, boats, it’s not easy to recycle. Various researchers have been working on it. Now Ellison’s boat will be part of Boeing’s research.

via Larry Ellison Is Recycling An America’s Cup Yacht For Science – Business Insider.

Coastal Interior Design (Part Two): Unique and Unusual Homes | It’s So Fabulous!

The Ship Residence

Located on South Bass Island in Lake Erie at Put-in-Bay, Ohio, rests the Owners and Captains Quarters of the former Great Lakes Shipping Boat, The Benson Ford. Originally designed by Henry Ford, the boat was in service for 50 years. In 1986, rather than scrapping the entire vessel, the top front section of the boat (comprised of walnut paneled state rooms, dining room, galley, and passenger lounge) was removed by an Ohio couple. They placed the rescued quarters on a picturesque home lot, transforming them into The Ship Residence.

via Coastal Interior Design (Part Two): Unique and Unusual Homes | It’s So Fabulous!.

Where do GRP boats go at the end of their service life? – Reinforced Plastics

I post on ship breaking and boat disposal because I am concerned about how much maritime waste is being produced and ignored.  Fiberglass boats are everywhere. And they don’t breakdown.

Because composite vessels are highly durable, end-of-life (EOL) disposal has not so far been a major issue. Many of the numerous glassfibre boats produced in the early years still exist. But the time will come – is coming – when these craft reach the end of their lives and will have to be disposed of.

The present trickle of EOL disposals is likely to become a ‘tsunami’ as successive generations of craft reach the end. Unlike metal and wooden boats, which are made of recyclable or naturally degrading materials, fibreglass craft leave an enduring trace on the environment …

via Where do GRP boats go at the end of their service life? – Reinforced Plastics.

It’s Almost Time To Flip The Shipwrecked Costa Concordia — Here’s How The Complex Plan Will Go Down – SFGate

costa concordia salvage operation

The teams on site will have only one chance to flip the ship upright. If it goes wrong, the backup plan is to break up the ship where it lies, at a huge cost to the local environment.

via It’s Almost Time To Flip The Shipwrecked Costa Concordia — Here’s How The Complex Plan Will Go Down – SFGate.

Boat Roofed Shed, Unique shed from Up a mountain on a farm | Readersheds.co.uk

The happiest shed on the planet!

exterior

The roof is an upturned boat! It is located at an altitude of 750ft above sea level in the Cambrian Mountain range near Machynlleth in mid Wales. It is full of nautical nonsense befitting a boat turned upside down up a mountain!

It is heated by a 19th century French enamel wood burning stove. The chimney is an old queen pole from a circus big top that used to house elephants know as The elephant shed!

The shed is made completely from recycled materials except for the 12v system. 3 sets of chimes from inside mantelpiece clocks have been screwed into the centre board of the boat and you can play them with a big nail!

via Boat Roofed Shed, Unique shed from Up a mountain on a farm | Readersheds.co.uk.

New website promotes safer and cleaner shipbreaking | Other news… – Asia – Recycling News | Recycling International – recycling magazine for professionals by professionals |

The NGO Shipbreaking Platform has launched a website – www.offthebeach.org – which lists all the ships that have been sent for breaking on the beaches of South Asia since 2009. The site aims to promote safer and cleaner ship recycling and to inform cargo companies wishing to select responsible ship-owners to carry their goods around the world, the organisation explains.

The website is part of the NGO Shipbreaking Platform’s ‘Off the Beach!’ campaign, which is designed to raise awareness of harmful shipbreaking practices and to promote the alternatives. Shipbreaking on the beaches of India, Bangladesh and Pakistan involves worker rights violations and severe environmental degradation, it is claimed.

The NGO Shipbreaking Platform underlines that some of the shipping companies listed for having sent vessels to what it deems to be substandard facilities have subsequently changed their recycling policies. These ‘success stories’ are featured in the blog section of the website where the Platform will also highlight setbacks.

For more information, visit: www.shipbreakingplatform.org

via New website promotes safer and cleaner shipbreaking | Other news… – Asia – Recycling News | Recycling International – recycling magazine for professionals by professionals |.

EU and South Asia Scrap Over Recycling Ships – WSJ.com

The proposed legislation would bar ships flying European Union flags from “beaching” old ships, that is, steaming them onto shore, where they are dismantled by hand at informal shipyards. The low-cost, ship-scrapping industry of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh is a multibillion-dollar business employing about a million workers, and the three countries account for more than 70% of the global ship-recycling industry.

The European Parliament has approved measures that would ban beaching and fine EU shipowners for violations. Advocacy groups have criticized beaching for its poor safety and environmental record, preferring that ship breaking, as the broader vessel-recycling industry is known, be conducted in dry dock or at piers so that waters aren’t exposed to toxic spills.

via EU and South Asia Scrap Over Recycling Ships – WSJ.com.

David Kemp – Wooden Whaler

David Kemp created a whale from two derelict cove-boats and thus stole my heart. Below are excerpts from his website. Pay a visit and be amazed!

The artist David Kemp lives and works on the far western coast of Cornwall, among the old mine workings near Botallack. He finds material for his work in rich seams of junk, appearing here and there at boot fairs, but adding up, in the imagination, to something like that mysterious productive heap of dust in Dickens’ Our Mutual Friend. In fact there is an almost Dickensian breadth of vision, richness of character and sharpness of observation in Kemp’s work.

David Kemp’s work is serious fun: serious, because his intention is to tackle our folly and or materialist excesses and fun because he is a master of life-enhancing humour.

Driven by his own apocalyptic and subversive vision, he makes sculpture from the disregarded bits and pieces left by successive consumer boom. These remains point out the awful truth – that we value trash and are seduced again and again by the trumped-up new. Technology that is phoney, or only half understood, is grasped at for answers to our needs. In pursuit of the largest thing, it becomes impossible to tell real technological advances from the dead-ends.

This point is made for this exhibition particularly by reference to electricity. The rush to harness the power of frog’s legs, to make hair stand on end or capture lightning were all so far beside the point – of course we know now, but in Kemp’s alternative world they have a different and more telling relevance. By making what might have been, or should have been, invented he mirrors universal human weaknes.

David Kemp

via about.

Shaped on all Six Sides on Vimeo

via Shaped on all Six Sides on Vimeo.

[vimeo http://www.vimeo.com/63683408 w=400&h=225]

A short documentary about the craft and philosophy of wooden boat carpentry.

Directed by Kat Gardiner

Produced by Kat Gardiner & Nathan Walker

Starring Andy Stewart

with

James McMullen

Greg McCrosky

Nathan Walker

A Food Chain Production

Shot & Edited by Kat Gardiner

GoPro & Music Supervision by Nathan Walker

Titles by Slow Loris

Shipbreaking is ‘recycling,’ Port is told – Daily Astorian

Frank Allen of Astoria, Oregon is quickly becoming one of my heroes.

He is proposing a ship breaking facility in Astoria.  Recycling ships can be toxic, and in countries without regulations life-threatening. But leaving ships to degrade and rot (which we have in our waterways everywhere) is a travesty to the waters, the materials, and the history of a working vessel.

We wish Frank Allen the best of luck in his quest.

By EDWARD STRATTON

The Daily Astorian |

“What we’re proposing is not shipbreaking,” said Frank Allen, a partner with Scott Fraser in Blue Ocean Environmental, standing at the front of a packed Port of Astoria Commission meeting Tuesday night.

During a presentation, he talked as much to the audience as he did the Port commissioners.

The abnormally large crowd gathered in anticipation of Blue Ocean’s proposal for recycling the metal from derelict vessels at the Port’s North Tongue Point facility. Several previous applications for shipbreaking on the Columbia River have been rejected in recent years because of widespread fears that toxic materials would pollute fragile salmon areas.

The Port and Blue Ocean had a nondisclosure agreement that was recently lifted.

“I have a job,” said Allen, adding that he works in the international seafood trade. “This is just something that bothers me.”

There are 300 derelict vessels in Oregon and 400 in Washington deteriorating and polluting the environment, said Allen. Thousands are being disposed of without any environmental concerns, he said.

He said the two options with this issue are to be proactive or do nothing.

“There’s a lot of hurdles to doing this right,” said Allen, who offered to rent a space in Astoria for multiple town halls to discuss how his company wants to recycle vessels. “The true thing is to do this very slowly, very carefully.”

His operation would start with a small, 60- to 70-foot vessel at North Tongue Point. Blue Ocean would bring in specialists to remove the toxic substances, recycle the metal and ship it by barge to Seattle. Steel firm Nucor Corporation (www.nucor .com) will take it for what Allen said would currently be about $19 a ton and reprocess it for use in the U.S.

“We’re working directly under the EPA,” said Allen, adding that the operation’s primary environmental monitor reporting to the state would be the Maul Foster & Alongi engineering firm of Portland. The U.S. Coast Guard would also be involved in permitting Blue Ocean to tow any vessels in.

“We’re doing it to prove a point: that it can be done,” said Allen, adding that it’s going to build up over a number of years and not be a moneymaker to start. He asked for a chance to try the process on a small, possibly local vessel, after which Blue Ocean, the Port and the public could go over the results and decide whether to keep Blue Ocean around.

“The good thing for the community about this … it’s so labor intensive,” said Allen. “It takes so much manpower to get this done. And they’re not minimum-wage jobs.”

Along with a willingness to give three or four public presentations, Allen said he’ll look into creating an email account specifically for people with questions about his proposal and will provide information to the public that isn’t proprietary. Blue Ocean doesn’t currently have a web site.

“Years down the road, we’d like to work on larger vessels,” said Allen, adding that he sees Tongue Point being able to handle 50 vessels a year at full capacity. “Someone’s got to address this. It can’t keep going the way it’s going.”

Oregon or Washington  native? You will want to read the entire article via Shipbreaking is ‘recycling,’ Port is told – Daily Astorian: Free.

BKLYN Designs: Aellon Turns Shipwrecked Boats and Reclaimed Materials into Fabulous Furnishings | Inhabitat

Inhabitat has a nice feature on Aellon – folks who make goods from boats. Check it out and be inspired.

Serious stewards of the earth who ensure their work has the smallest environmental impact, Aellon has a wide-ranging handcrafted product range that will enliven any home.

[vimeo http://www.vimeo.com/62376352 w=400&h=300]

via BKLYN Designs: Aellon Turns Shipwrecked Boats and Reclaimed Materials into Fabulous Furnishings | Inhabitat New York City.

Shipwrecks in the Staten Island Boat Graveyard | Urban Ghosts |

staten island boat graveyard 3 Rusting Wrecks in the Staten Island Boat Graveyard

The Staten Island Boat Graveyard – officially called Witte Marine Scrap Yard or Arthur Kill Boat Yard – is the final resting place of dozens of rusting, rotting, abandoned and decommissioned vessels. Rossville‘s last commercial maritime salvage yard, the semi-submerged boats are popular with local urban explorers and others interested in Staten Island’s maritime history.

staten island boat graveyard 4 Rusting Wrecks in the Staten Island Boat Graveyard

staten island boat graveyard 5 Rusting Wrecks in the Staten Island Boat Graveyard

Photographs by Bob Jagendorph go see the rest via Shipwrecks in the Staten Island Boat Graveyard | Urban Ghosts |.

Ship Recycling Fund Approved by European Parliament · Environmental Management & Energy News · Environmental Leader

 

Environment Commissioner Janez Poto?nik said: “Although the ship recycling sector has improved its practices, many facilities continue to operate under conditions that are dangerous and damaging. This proposal aims to ensure that our old ships are recycled in a way that respects the health of workers as well as the environment. It is a clear signal to invest urgently in upgrading recycling facilities.” The new rules, which will take the form of a Regulation, propose a system of survey, certification and authorization for large commercial seagoing vessels that fly the flag of an EU Member State, covering their whole life cycle from construction to operation and recycling.

via Ship Recycling Fund Approved by European Parliament · Environmental Management & Energy News · Environmental Leader.

Abandoned Steam Ship Transformed into Giant Street Art Gallery

“Mauricamia” by Fin DAC & Written by: Yohani Kamarudin

 

Geisha mural on the Duke of Lancaster with blue sky

The decks are empty and the turbines still and silent on this hulking steamer. For over three decades, the Duke of Lancaster sat on the banks of the River Dee in north Wales, slowly rusting away. To anyone who saw her, the ship was little more than another abandoned maritime relic, but that was before the DuDug project intervened – and artists turned what had become a giant eyesore into a colorful open-air art gallery.

Pirate graffiti on the Black Duke in Wales

Three street art murals on the Duke of Lancaster

See the rest via Abandoned Steam Ship Transformed into Giant Street Art Gallery.

Shipbreaking: World’s most dangerous job? – Salon.com

Decommissioning ships – or shipbreaking kills people.

Poor people of course. Poor people that live very far from where the ships are originally created.

Lets do something about this shall we? Start by just learning that this dangerous industry exists. We’ll help with that part.

If you have any good ideas to get the word out about shipbreaking, we’d like to hear them. Please use the comments section to let us know. Thanks!

Shipbreaking: World's most dangerous job?

Given the appalling conditions here, some have even called for a moratorium on Asian shipbreaking. “Despite the possibility of proper disposal in Europe or other developed countries, the vast majority of European shipping companies continue to profit by having their ships broken cheaply and dangerously on the beaches of South Asia,” says Patrizia Heidegger, executive director of the NGO Shipbreaking Platform. “The EU must adopt mechanisms that will prevent European ship owners from exporting toxic ships for breaking in developing countries and instead recycle them according to the health, safety and environmental laws and standards of their own countries.”

Read this article via Shipbreaking: World’s most dangerous job? – Salon.com.

Laurel 1891 — Upcycle Americas Oldest Oyster Boat by Jean Paul Vellotti — Kickstarter

Look what we found waiting in our in-box from Kickstarter this morning. You better believe with think this is a great idea!

They need some serious clams though, so if you like it too cruse on over and throw them a line (or two).

Enjoy sustainably-harvested oysters and cocktails on the deck of Laurel. Upcycled crafts from her deck restoration make great gifts.

This image shows how Laurel looks today, ready for her journey as an oyster bar.

Although the Laurel holds the honor of “oldest active fishing vessel” by the United States Coast Guard, her days of hard-work are behind her. Laurel is a real head turner so we came up with an idea to bring her from port-to-port and let people come aboard and hear about her legacy…and have some really great oysters and cold drinks at the same time.

Additionally, farmers harvest dinners on her deck for a limited number of guests, served family style, should prove to be a hit. Because Laurel is a mobile platform, guest chefs at many locations are possible which will keep the menu exciting. And, for hyper-local foodies, Laurel can still harvest her own shellfish, so dont be surprised if the oysters you eat in the evening were harvested by her that morning!

This image from 1930 shows Laurel docked at Greenport, Long Island, NY. For 50 years (from 1905 to 1955), Laurel brought seed oysters from Connecticut and planted them in the Great Peconic Bay; she returned weekly with Long Island grown oysters.

Laurel's deck beams will be replaced by Maine-shipwright Captain Robert Blood (yes, that's really his name). Inset is a photo of A.C. Brown, master carpenter and builder of Laurel.

Laurel sitting pretty after her yearly painting and caulking at Cove Marina in Norwalk, CT. In the background is another wooden oyster boat, the Catherine M. Wedmore.

You can almost taste the sea in this photo of Laurel passing Penfield Light off Fairfield, CT. As you can see, her decks have seen better days.

via Laurel 1891 — Upcycle Americas Oldest Oyster Boat by Jean Paul Vellotti — Kickstarter.

For craftsmen, reclaimed wood is a tangible reminder of history – – Boston.com

Interesting story on Boston.com

Preserved old growth timber for ship building found in a salt pond. Its like winning the lottery of wood – if you are into that kind of thing.

Brett Stevens fashions a bench using 19th-century wood that was reclaimed from a salt-water pond at the Charlestown Navy Yard in 2010.

He crafts benches, tables, picture frames, candle holders, and lamp bases from sections of live oak and white oak that were retrieved from the Charlestown Navy Yard in 2010. The enormous timbers were discovered while crews were prepping the site for the ongoing Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital construction project.

As Stevens explained, the wood had been stored in a salt-water pond to preserve it for the eventual reconstruction of either the USS Constitution (a frigate launched in 1797, and widely known as Old Ironsides) or the USS Constellation (launched in 1854). But in the mid-1880s, the shipyard began making all-metal boats, and then, in 1914, on the brink of World War I, the timber pond was covered to make room for diesel storage tanks.

Then the wood was all but forgotten — until three years ago. Upon the trove’s rediscovery, Mystic Seaport, a living history museum in Connecticut, took some of the timbers to restore the whaler Charles W. Morgan, while Stevens’ business partner Peter Sel­lew bought the rest — 13 tractor-trailer loads, now stored at New England Hardwood Supply in Littleton.

via For craftsmen, reclaimed wood is a tangible reminder of history – – Boston.com.

1,000kg trash removed from seabed – Khaleej Times

Egypt – has a marine clean up campaign!  Brilliant Egypt – thank you.

One thousand kilograms of waste — including aluminium cans, empty bottles, plastic, glass, ropes, metal pipes and bits of old boats — are now no longer part of the marine life, after a clean up campaign.About 50 professional deep sea divers cleaned the garbage from the sea floor off the coast of Sharjah.Organised by the Sharjah Museums Department SMD and other government bodies on Saturday the ‘Flag Island Seabed Cleanup Campaign’ is the first-of-its-kind event.

via 1,000kg trash removed from seabed – Khaleej Times.

Global Ship Breaking Business Booms as Container Industry Suffers – SPIEGEL ONLINE

The infamous oil tanker Exxon Valdez is almost completely gone, most of it having already been recycled in Indias voracious steel mills. But its dismantling on a beach in India has once again highlighted the dangers, both environmental and physical, associated with the booming ship-breaking industry.

Photo Gallery: The Ship-Breakers of South Asia

In about two more weeks, there will be nothing left of the former oil tanker, which in 1989 was responsible for the largest oil spill ever in the United States, leaking more than 41 million liters (10.8 million gallons) of crude oil into Alaska’s Prince William Sound. After the accident, the Exxon Valdez was converted into an ore carrier, and it was most recently renamed the Oriental N. Priya Blue, an Indian scrapping and salvage company, bought the freighter last spring for $16 million (€11.9 million), solely for the purpose of scrapping it.

A ship being dismantled at the Alang shipyard in India. Leases on the...

On Aug. 2, the ship was grounded at high tide on the beach at Alang. There, at the world’s largest graveyard for ships, more than 300 workers are being paid a few rupees a day to dismantle the vessel.

There was a great outcry when it was revealed that Alang was to be the notorious ship’s final resting place. Although it does not contain more toxic materials than other ships, environmentalists took advantage of the former tanker’s prominence to file a lawsuit at India’s Supreme Court to block its import. It was unsuccessful.

Ship breaking companies are located in many parts of South Asia, including...

But the trial brought to light, once again, the catastrophic conditions at many low-wage shipyards in South Asia, where old ships are being scrapped and gutted. In October, six workers died in a fire in Alang as they were dismantling the oil tanker Union Brave on the beach. One of the workers had struck a pipe with his blowtorch that still contained oil.Workers climbing onto a ship at the Gaddani ship-breaking yard in Pakistan. The...In Pakistan, more than 20 shipyard workers died and more than 150 were injured in 2011. And in Alang alone, 173 workers have died in more than 170 shipyards since 2001, killed by falling steel parts or burned to death in explosions. Workers are sometimes barefoot as they climb over the ships, and toxic waste is often incinerated on the beach.

Read the rest via Global Ship Breaking Business Booms as Container Industry Suffers – SPIEGEL ONLINE.

Marine-related robberies crop up across U.S.

A spate of marine robberies around the country indicates that although the economy is slowly improving, it might not be rebounding quickly enough for some.

From copper wiring and aluminum boat docks sold for scrap, to yellow pine for repairing boats, to boats themselves, several robberies occurred in January, according to news reports.

In Yorktown, Va., The Waterman’s Museum said thieves stole $1,500 worth of boatbuilding lumber from inside the museum’s gates.

“It wasn’t good for anything except fixing or building boats,” volunteer Harry Hart said in a release, The Virginia Gazette reported. “They knew what they were looking for and they took only what they wanted — yellow pine. They just left the white oak where it was sitting.”

The loss of the wood leaves the museum in a difficult situation as it tries to move forward on boat restoration and building projects. That’s because the correct wood is hard to find, especially in the winter.

Continue reading Marine-related robberies crop up across U.S.

The Noorderlicht Café Is A Healthy And Social Eatery in Amsterdam’s Old Shipyard | Inhabitat – Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building

Inhabit has some serious adaptive reuse candy – if you are into that sort of thing.

We are! Especially if the setting is in an shipyard in Amsterdam.

The waterfront along Amsterdam North is a vast industrial area that was once the city’s largest shipyard. Known as NDSM (aka “City of the Arts”), the area is now full of large warehouses and open spaces that have been transformed into experimental projects and shelters. Within its grounds, the brilliant Noorderlicht (Aurora Borealis), which is housed in a former greenhouse, serves as a meeting place for creatives working in the area and offers a wide variety of tasty organic seasonal dishes.

via The Noorderlicht Café Is A Healthy And Social Eatery in Amsterdam’s Old Shipyard | Inhabitat – Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building.

Hitler’s Toilet Is In a New Jersey Auto Shop – Tablet Magazine

Just another reason to be Jersey Proud!

For half a century, Greg’s Auto Repair has housed the commode from Aviso Grille, the Führer’s biggest yacht.

After the war ended, the Aviso Grille was taken to the United States and ended up in the hands of New Jersey shipyard owner Harry Doan, who illegally charged visitors 25 cents to board and tour Hitler’s Yacht. However, according to Glass, both Doan and the federal government wanted to prevent the ship from becoming a memorial to Hitler, and so it was scrapped in Doan’s salvage yard in the early 1950s.

At that point, Sam Carlani needed a new toilet. Doan, his close friend and poker buddy, told him he had one available

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The article is great, go read it via Hitler’s Toilet Is In a New Jersey Auto Shop – Tablet Magazine.

Historic ship buffs work to restore World War II landing craft, create maritime heritage museum in northwest Oregon | OregonLive.com

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They’ve been working on the USS LCI 713, an infantry landing craft, for 14 years and hope to have the ship sailing before long — depending on money and parts.

They’re also keeping in touch with other ship restorers, aiming to start a working-model maritime museum between Portland-Vancouver and St. Helens. The museum has received $200,000 in cash donations as well as two grants from the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office for $20,000 and $11,500, said Rick Holmes, president of the Amphibious Forces Memorial Museum, the nonprofit that owns the LCI 713.

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Maritime Heritage Coalition

What: An Oregon nonprofit corporation dedicated to promoting regional maritime, environmental and native people’s heritage. It hopes to build a regional maritime heritage center.

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LCI 713 donations: Amphibious Forces Memorial Museum, LCI 713, P.O. Box 17220, Portland, OR 97220

LCI 713 volunteering: Rick Holmes, 509-427-5402; Gordon Smith, 360-256-5901; afmm@amphibiousforces.org

Museum organizers hope to include Portland’s fully restored World War II-era PT 658, the Oregon Maritime Museum’s sternwheeler Portland and other historic vessels. “We’ve met with these people and we’re making progress,” said Holmes.

via Historic ship buffs work to restore World War II landing craft, create maritime heritage museum in northwest Oregon | OregonLive.com.

RECYCLINGPORTAL – Green Ship Recycling: New study argues for an incentive for shipowners

“Every year, more European end-of-life ships containing hazardous materials are sent to India, Bangladesh and Pakistan. Such practices are unacceptable and Europe is in the driver’s seat to put a stop to this on-going human rights and environmental disaster,” comments Patrizia Heidegger, Executive Director of the NGO Shipbreaking Platform. “Only a financial mechanism enforced in EU ports can properly internalize costs and close loopholes, which have allowed ships until now to escape legislation and accountability.”

via RECYCLINGPORTAL – Green Ship Recycling: New study argues for an incentive for shipowners.

Interface To Recycle Discarded Fishing Nets Into Carpet | Sustainable Brands

Global carpet tile manufacturer Interface, Inc. will soon begin using discarded fishing nets to make carpets, bringing both conservation and socioeconomic benefits to some of the world’s poorest coastal communities.

The company recently completed a pilot project, called Net-Works, with conservation charity the Zoological Society of London (ZSL). By establishing a community-based supply chain for discarded nets, Net-Works aims to improve the livelihood of local fishers, while providing Interface with an innovative source of recycled materials for its carpet tiles.

Discarded nets on the beaches or in the sea have a detrimental effect on the environment and marine life as they can persist for centuries. But most nylon from these fishing nets is the same material used to make carpet yarn.

The viability of the collaboration was proven between June and October 2012. After conducting research and working closely with local communities and NGOs, Net-Works established the infrastructure to collect the fishing nets, gathering one ton (1,000 kg) of nets in the first month — and substantially cleaning up the beaches in four local communities near Danajon Bank, a threatened coral reef in the Philippines. Operations are now scaling up, with the intention of developing commercial carpet tiles incorporating the collected nets later this year.

Continue reading Interface To Recycle Discarded Fishing Nets Into Carpet | Sustainable Brands