Category Archives: Portland Area

12 high-design wineries across the U.S. – Curbed

The Saffron Fields Vineyard in Oregon. Courtesy of Saffron Fields Vineyard

Designed by architect Richard Shugar of 2Form Architecture, this tasting room in Oregon was completed in 2013. Originally on the site of a dairy farm, the winery’s new building uses reclaimed materials from the old barn and sits on a hill with panoramic views. A small patio cantilevers over a pond that laps against the south side of the building, and guests can enjoy wine on the expansive patio. Sloping roof planes extend from the building and also allow rainwater runoff to be collected for irrigation and to fill up the adjacent pond.

Source: 12 high-design wineries across the U.S. – Curbed

Pamplin Media Group – NE Portland demolition dust-up highlights fears over lead paint

COURTESY PHOTO: PORTLAND CHRONICLE – Builder Peter Kusyk began demolition of a Northeast Portland church in April. Kusyk’s Firenze Development has faced off with neighbors of a Northeast Porltand bungalow because of concerns about lead in the demolition dust.

The problem was, as neighbors were to learn, the letter referred to lead levels in water running off a landfill. It had nothing to do with lead dust flying from a demolition.

Source: Pamplin Media Group – NE Portland demolition dust-up highlights fears over lead paint

Decon and Reuse Expo ’17: Portland’s landmark deconstruction ordinance takes center stage | KATU

“If we can save that amount of space in the landfills, that means that we’re not generating emissions from the decaying of those materials,” said expo organizer and re-use consultant, Sara Badiali. “The environmental impact is astounding.”

Source: Decon and Reuse Expo ’17: Portland’s landmark deconstruction ordinance takes center stage | KATU

Master of Special Problem Solving, Dave Bennink Disassembles 1,000 Buildings by Hand – Sara Badiali

 

Master of Special Problem Solving, Dave Bennink Disassembles 1,000 Buildings by Hand  

by Sara Badiali

Imagine you are packing your car for a trip. You can only move your gear once, but you still have to maximize space.  Sound difficult?  Now imagine you have to do it with a stranger’s gear.  That’s what Dave Bennink of Re-Use Consulting has been doing almost every week for the past 25 years.

But instead of gear, he does it with entire dismantled buildings.  Dave’s expertise is in disassembling structures, staging the components for transport, and then moving them to be resold.

Dave deconstructs buildings for reuse. He’s dismantled 1,000 structures, in 42 states and 4 providences. He is a master of spatial problem solving. The materials are so big and take up so much space on site that they can only be moved once.

Dave Bennink’s extensive knowledge and experience meant that when the City of Portland passed their new Deconstruction Ordinance, they asked Dave to train the City’s first Certified Deconstruction Contractors. They also tapped him to train and certify a new deconstruction workforce.

In addition to his own business dismantling structures, Dave is a certified Deconstruction Trainer for the Building Material Reuse Association. He’s done trainings for the City of Seattle, Vancouver, other municipalities, numerous small businesses and organizations.

 

Students are drilled in safety, technique, material recovery, recycling, diversion equations, staging and selling materials. All of the lessons take place in the actual building the students are deconstructing.

It is a common site to see Dave drawing out waste diversion calculations on the interior walls one day, and the next day the walls are gone.  If you ever buy reclaimed materials with calculations on them, you may have just purchased a piece of one of Dave’s many classrooms.

Along with his own business, and deconstruction training, Dave also is a consultant for reclaimed building material reuse start-ups. Guiding entrepreneurs with reuse business planning, deconstruction jobs, and marketing used building materials is Dave’s passion.

He is happy to help new converts into the world of environmental stewardship, job creation, community building, and healthy alternatives to demolition. His motto is “Say no to the track hoe”.

 

 

If you are interested in meeting Dave Bennink you can see him present twice at the Decon + Reuse ’17 Expo: Saving Our Past, Building the Future conference in Portland, Oregon on September 24th-27th. Dave will be on a panel with some of his certified deconstruction students. He will also be speaking on the basic principles of starting a reuse business (including spatial acumen).

Dave will be presenting at the Decon + Reuse ’17 Expo with over 50 other building material reuse experts, and hundreds of participants. This is the largest building material reuse event in the country and is being hosted by the City of Portland, Metro, the Reclamation Administration, and Portland State University’s Institute for Sustainable Solutions.

 

Dave Bennink owns and operates Re-Use Consulting, which you can find it at ReuseConsulting.com.  Or contact him at re-use@comcast.net or (360) 201-6977.

Something old, something new. (Re)using salvaged building materials | Metro

Mary Reese hunts for tile at the new Habitat for Humanity ReStore in Gresham.

Jacobson compares shopping for salvaged building materials to thrift or vintage shopping, and advises shopping early and often. “Stock changes from day to day and quantities can be limited,” he says. “The list of stores is growing and that makes it easier to find what you need, but the region’s supply chain for used building materials is still a work in progress” Also, he says, find a contractor willing to work with you, one who’s willing to deconstruct and salvage materials, as well as incorporate reused items into the new space.

Source: Something old, something new. (Re)using salvaged building materials | Metro

Fireworks Flash Sale Thru Friday – Last Chance for Discount Tix

Last chance for earlybird pricing + outstanding keynotes + book your hotel now!

Fireworks Flash Sale Thru Friday!

Say that five times fast…

In keeping with a celebratory week, we’ve created a special sale and brought back earlybird pricing on Decon + Reuse ’17 for five days only!. Register today to lock in the savings, or wait til Sunday and help donate a bit extra to the BMRA.

Jim Lindberg & Adam Minter – Keynote Speakers

We have locked down two really outstanding keynote speakers for the conference. On Monday September 25th, Adam Minter will kick off the conference speaking to the globalization of reuse and recycling markets. Then on Tuesday we’ll hear from Jim Lindberg of Preservation Green Lab on how reuse is a key tool of re-urbanization and future building.

Hotel Blocks in Portland

The low low pricing that we managed to negotiate at two hotels in Portland expires on 7/24/17 – book your rooms today!

Decon + Reuse ’17 Speakers invited by the Reclamation Administration

The Reclamation Administration has made a lot of friends over the years.

We are proud to say that over a third of the speakers for Decon + Reuse ’17 Expo: Saving our Past, Building the Future are from our invitations. These presenters have all been featured on the Reclamation Administration going as far back as 2011!

Here is a list of Presenters brought to you by the Reclamation Administration.  You can see them all in Portland, Oregon on September 24th – 27th at the Decon + Reuse ’17 Expo.

James Lindberg

Detroit Audio Lab

Eco3d

Sons of Sawdust

ReCor Door 

Ohio Materials Marketplace

Louise McRae

Viridian Reclaimed Wood

Futel

The Rockford Brand

Miigwech Aki Deconstruction

Pioneer Millworks

Space Monkey Designs/Fantom Foundry

diederick kraaijeveld

Wallace Detroit Guitars

Portland Finds Jobs in Its Ban on Demolition – CityLab

 

“I had no idea deconstruction even existed,” Stigen says. “I was working a dead-end job. I had know idea what kind of trade I wanted to get into.” When she heard later about the deconstruction training, she said her first thought was “perfect. Sign me up.” When CityLab spoke with Stigen, she was on her lunch break at a deconstruction site with Lovett Deconstruction, where she secured a job before the training even started.

Source: Portland Finds Jobs in Its Ban on Demolition – CityLab

Deconstruction of old homes creates more jobs in Portland | KGW.com

(Photo: Nina Mehlhaf)

That rule means a lot more certified deconstruction experts are needed. Tuesday, the city let us into a hands-on workshop at a home on Northwest 23rd Avenue, where 15 men and women were learning the trade.

Source: Deconstruction of old homes creates more jobs in Portland | KGW.com

Movers and Makers: Salvage Works’ stories are told in wood | KGW.com

Salvage Works, North Portland, Tracy Barry, KGW

Browning is part artist, part builder, so It’s not surprising that he is drawn to the inner beauty of the reclaimed lumber. And lucky for him, so are many others, just as eager to search for the stories hidden in every grain and to embrace the promise of reinvention.

Source: Movers and Makers: Salvage Works’ stories are told in wood | KGW.com

A doughnut king’s historic Queen Anne castle captures Portland commuters’ imagination | OregonLive.com

Everyone who frequently crosses the Ross Island Bridge has spotted the beeswax yellow Queen Anne Victorian-style mansion with a 50-foot-high turret. MLS#16396701. Photo provided by Premiere Property Group

The family earned its wealth through co-ownership of the Poulsen-Inman Lumber Co., then the largest lumber company in the state. Fellow timber baron Robert D. Inman erected a matching Queen Anne on the same east bluff overlooking the Willamette River. Inman, however, lived in his mansion. The properties, once safe in the Brooklyn neighborhood, were separated first by streaming traffic on the highway after the Ross Island Bridge was opened and later by bulldozers. In the 1950s, long after both men had died and their company sold to Georgia-Pacific, Inman’s house was torn down to make way for a parking lot, according to the Cafe Unknown history blog.

Source: A doughnut king’s historic Queen Anne castle captures Portland commuters’ imagination (photos) | OregonLive.com

Clackamas County Landmark to be Demolished | Restore Oregon

Philip Oatfield

Phil plumbed the house for gas, electricity not arriving until about 1913. Phil and Dora married Nov. 8, 1903, moved into the house, and started their family. To complement the landscape Phil planted an orchard and four Giant Sequoia trees from Broetje’s Nursey on Oatfield and Courtney Rds. – now Clackamas County Heritage Trees.

The purpose of both Oregon’s Historic Preservation Office and Clackamas County’s Historic Preservation Ordinance is to protect and preserve our historic and cultural resources. Unfortunately without the stewardship of a caring owner this process can be circumvented and financial realities can intervene. The legacy of the Oatfield family is quickly disappearing, and unless a philanthropic individual steps forward to move this house to a new location this historic community icon will be lost forever.

Philip Oatfield House now

Source: Clackamas County Landmark to be Demolished | Restore Oregon

Moovel’s new Portland office restores 125-year-old fixture in Old Town Chinatown | OregonLive.com

A fireplace in the curved wall of the central hub welcomes visitors at Moovel headquarters in Portland’s Old Town Chinatown on Wednesday, Jan. 4, 2017. Moovel, a tech subsidiary of Daimler, opened its headquarters in the restored Overland Warehouse. (John Rudoff/For The Oregonian/OregonLive)

Moovel’s arrival in the neighborhood is the latest example of how Portland’s booming tech scene is transforming the city’s core. Portland’s Urban Development Partners spent more than a year, and upwards of $3.5 million, rehabilitating the Overland. Urban Development Partners project manager Joren Bass said the investment reflects ongoing revitalization in Old Town Chinatown and the historic nature of the Overland itself. “You can’t create space like that in a new building. It’s just impossible,” Bass said. “You can’t find timber like that anymore.” Moovel chief operating officer Sadhana Shenoy said the goal was to build community among employees, drawing on the building’s unique history.

Source: Moovel’s new Portland office restores 125-year-old fixture in Old Town Chinatown | OregonLive.com

Turning old barns and deconstructed buildings in lumber gold: Salvage works | KCBY

Preston Browning, owner of Salvage Works, with some deconstructed lumber. (Salvage Works)

“You see on really the earliest barns all hand-hewn beams, very rustic, very beautiful well-aged material,” Browning said. “We sell a lot to contractors and fabricators who are building the interiors of restaurants and bars, coffee shops, offices, that sort of thing.” Anyone who’s been in a recently remodeled or newly built bar or restaurant in Portland has likely seen the kind of wood that fills Salvage Works’ 25,000 square foot complex. The deconstruction ordinance — and plenty of deteriorating barns — will keep them and Salvage Works in old wood for years to come. “It provides jobs, it keeps material out of the landfill and really provides this amazing material that you just can’t find anymore,” Browning said of the ordinance.

Source: Turning old barns and deconstructed buildings in lumber gold: Salvage works | KCBY

This Cascade Locks Start-Up Saves Activewear from Landfills | Mount Hood | Portland Monthly

Renewal Workshop HQ: a  stone’s throw from Bridge of the Gods in the beautiful Columbia Gorge. IMAGE: RENEWAL WORKSHOP

So what does the Renewal Workshop sell? Unique, restored activewear diverted from landfills and offered at significantly discounted prices. From its Cascade Locks repair facility, the Workshop intercepts articles of clothing from some of the biggest West Coast names in the outdoor clothing industry (think Prana, Ibex, and Mountain Khakis) that—due to small tears, sewing malfunctions, discolorations, and the like—have been deemed unfit for regular retail and normally would be on their way to landfills.  Instead, the Renewal Workshop founders have worked out a unique arrangement with these companies: rather than trash these items, they’re gifted, and shipped, to Cascade Locks, to be washed and mended back to retail quality.

Source: This Cascade Locks Start-Up Saves Activewear from Landfills | Mount Hood | Portland Monthly

UPDATE: Demolition ban aiming to reduce C&D waste in Portland, OR goes into effect | Waste Dive

This is expected to divert about 8 million pounds of material from landfills per year and affect about 30% of homes that would be demolished. A study from the Northwest Economic Research Center estimates the policy could create 30-50 jobs and up to $1.5 million in local economic activity.

Source: UPDATE: Demolition ban aiming to reduce C&D waste in Portland, OR goes into effect | Waste Dive

1920’s Portland, Oregon House for Sale: 3 beds 1 bath 1,078 sqft SE 119th Ave 

I love the wooded feeling the trees give while still being in an urban setting. The floor plan is functional with 1920’s touches. And the energy upgrade completely turned this from drafty and cold to comfortable and efficient.

Recently renovated, green and energy efficient upgrades. This 1920’s style ranch home in mature David Douglas area. Owner is a General Contractor and Passive House builder & Consultant that remodeled this home from top to bottom and inside to outside. The home features over 1000 square feet of living space, three bedrooms with a functional floor plan. Outside entry area for the unfinished basement that is perfect for storage or a workshop.

 

Source: 3251 SE 119th Ave, Portland, OR 97266 | Zillow

Why Portland Requires Deconstruction for its Oldest Homes – CityLab

Rebuilding Center Photo

Dismantling a home carefully enough that its components can be reused is a more intricate process than demolition. It takes longer and requires more labor in place of machinery. At first glance, the labor costs make deconstruction more expensive than demolition. In most cases, though, the tax benefits more than pay for deconstruction—the value of salvaged materials, which can be donated for tax credit or saved for reuse in later projects, is typically thousands of dollars greater than the cost difference between deconstruction and demolition. “When you don’t have to use energy to create a project, you’re just harvesting, it’s almost like free money,” Badiali says. “By simply dismantling something, you’re creating a product. You’re adding value.”

Source: Why Portland Requires Deconstruction for its Oldest Homes – CityLab

century-old homes saved from demolitions | KATU

North Portland’s Rebuilding Center – KATU photo

“All of us are pro-urban density, we all understand the concept, but you can’t make these changes this fast and give nothing back to the communities who are there in the first place,” said Seward, “If Portland doesn’t pony up, it may already be too late.” Moretti hopes in the future, the city will consider including homes built in the 20’s and 30’s.

Source: century-old homes saved from demolitions | KATU

For Sale: Reclaimed Bicycle Peddle Hanging Light – Portland, Oregon

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Hop and Vine is gone but these peddles once graced their walls. If you’ve ever been you’d remember the decor. Nostalgia for old Portland inspired this hanging lamp. Edison bulb, cloth covered wire, dimmer. $225. Contact reclamationnews @ gmail for more information on how to purchase.

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For Sale: Industrial Mechanical Table – Portland, Oregon

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A very sweet rolling table for sale. Cast aluminum base, adjustable height (2 ft at the tallest), 16″ x 22″ top. This is a mix of glue-lam top with a 1960’s drafting chair bottom. The handle is the chair’s adjustment knob. $300. Contact reclamationnews @ gmail for more information.

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For Sale: Modern Chandelier Made From Reclaimed Rose Parade Float- Portland, Oregon

Two years ago I worked as a welder fabricating the Rose Parade Floats for the City of Portland, Oregon. This chandelier is made from a support armature that was eventually cut out of the float structure. It makes a perfect modern hanging light. Own a piece of Portland reclaimed history!

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Reclaimed steel armature from the City of Portland’s Rose Parade float. Edison bulb, cloth covered wire, dimmer switch. $225. Contact reclamationnews @ gmail for purchase information.

 

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Historic homes can’t be saved from demolition

“When a property owner requests any property be removed, we will not give a demolition permit until 120 days after that request,” Carson said. Fred Leeson, president of the Architectural Heritage Center said the delay is meaningless if the developer doesn’t want to come to the table to preserve, move or salvage the structure.

Source: Historic homes can’t be saved from demolition

northeast portland neighbors set to buy back historic home | KATU

The Ocobock Mansion in Northeast Portland was built in 1913. (KATU Photo)

Other neighbors are concerned with how fast a home could be bought and almost torn down with little community input. “This house is indicative of so much of what’s happening here in Portland right now,” said Matthew Breeze, “How do we keep our communities livable and have a public process. I’m happy to have infill, but it should happen in a way that’s transparent.”

Source: northeast portland neighbors set to buy back historic home | KATU

Deconstruction vs. Demolition: Portland, Oregon’s Potential for Groundbreaking Health and Safety Studies in Building Demolition – By Sara Badiali

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Deconstruction vs. Demolition: Portland, Oregon’s Potential for Groundbreaking Health and Safety Studies in Building Demolition – By Sara Badiali

Demolition: deliberate destruction of a building or other structure.[1]

Deconstruction: the systematic dismantling of a building in order to recover the maximum amount of materials for reuse and recycling.[2]

 

The City of Portland is poised to contribute to the study of health and safety in building removal. The Deconstruction Ordinance will take effect starting October 2016. The ordinance outlines single family homes built before 1916 must be deconstructed for material reuse.  Deconstructing buildings will greatly lower greenhouse gas emissions and material disposal in landfills over traditional demolition.  Deconstruction not only provides access to unique materials but also viable building materials that would otherwise go to waste. The Deconstruction Ordinance will provide the first ever opportunity for side by side comparisons of demolition verses building deconstruction for environmental health and safety measures.

Portland presents an environment of blistering-fast paced development, houses upwards of one-hundred years old, and established demolition and deconstruction companies. Residential interest in environmental health and safety is at an all-time high due to incidents pertaining to lead and radon, and unprecedented housing demolition. Portland is also home to multiple academic organizations specializing in environmental health issues, health sciences, urban planning, and architecture.

By hosting studies of building removals, new information will lead to a better understanding of hazardous material reductions and ultimately best practices. Consequently research in Portland could be the catalyst for laws regulating more than standards for lead dust fall, but also heavy metals, asbestos, and water contamination in demolition practices.

 

Hazardous Particulates in Buildings

When a building is demolished, the mechanical action of crushing creates particulates of dust from the building’s materials. These particulates enter the air and spread throughout the environment.  Machines repeatedly driving over the worksite further circulate these particulates. Atmospheric conditions like wind can exacerbate the spread of dust.

There are currently no U.S. federal regulatory standards for lead dust fall, exterior settled dust, or dust-suppression methods in housing demolition.[3] There are also very few demolition dust fall related studies, or inquiries into whether hand dismantling structures (deconstruction) reduces the spread of potentially hazardous air particulates.

Lead and asbestos are by far the most studied and discussed of hazardous materials attributed to buildings. Asbestos is proven to cause the fatal diseases asbestosis, pleural disease, and lung cancer. According to a 2011 survey by U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control, over 37 million homes have lead based paint somewhere in the building. [4] The majority of hazardous lead is in homes built before 1978.

One study indicates that 37 billion square feet of building components are coated with deteriorated lead-based paint.[5] A 2008 study of lead exposures in U.S. children found that “Exposure to lead can occur from many pathways and sources, but housing is the main pathway of exposure in the U.S., accounting for approximately 70% of childhood lead poisoning cases.”[6]

There are other less well known potential health hazards in buildings.  Arsenic and heavy metals like chromium, copper, iron, and manganese are harmful to humans. These heavy metals are thought to be from use of pressure treated wood manufactured before 2003.  Mercury is a common toxic waste present in buildings, including gas pressure regulators, boiler heating systems, and thermostats. According to the Massachusetts Water Resource Authority “The amount of mercury present in one mercury thermometer is enough to pollute 5 million gallons of water.”[7] That is the capacity to contaminate a 20-acre lake with enough mercury to result in a fish consumption warning, says Wastecap of Massachusetts. Benzene, a chemical related to natural gas, is also found harmful to humans. Environmental dust is especially problematic for people who suffer from asthma.

Continue reading Deconstruction vs. Demolition: Portland, Oregon’s Potential for Groundbreaking Health and Safety Studies in Building Demolition – By Sara Badiali

Portland City Council to discuss deconstruction requirements | OregonLive.com

This Eastmoreland house was torn down last fall to make way for new construction. Mike Francis | The Oregonian/OregonLive

Already, though, some say the new rule isn’t enough. A group called United Neighborhoods for Reform wants the City Council to require deconstruction for all homes built before 1978 — when the government banned lead paint in consumer uses.

“When a house is demolished through mechanical demolition, lead is pulverized and sent up into the air and falls into neighbors’ yards as dust,” said Barbara Kerr, the group’s representative on the city’s Deconstruction Advisory Group. “If it’s deconstructed, it poses little danger.”

Source: Portland City Council to discuss deconstruction requirements | OregonLive.com

Portland Moves Forward With Demolition Ban For Old Homes . News | OPB

Squatters protest the demolition of a home in Southeast Portland. Amelia Templeton/OPB

“This will allow residents to acquire quality used building materials such as old growth lumber and some of the pieces of Portland history that otherwise would have been discarded into the landfill,” said Zach Klonoski, a sustainability advisor to the mayor.

Source: Portland Moves Forward With Demolition Ban For Old Homes . News | OPB

Concerns and Questions Mount Over Demolition Appeal Process | The Portland Chronicle

“It’s possible to have a neighborhood under this section of code with very few financial resources, and then we have a case here where there’s a neighborhood with a significant amount of resources and we get an entirely different result,” he said. “From a diversity, from a fairness, from a just general perception of government I think, that raises the possibility of having different decisions based solely on economics.”

Source: Concerns and Questions Mount Over Demolition Appeal Process | The Portland Chronicle

Crews begin demolishing North Portland home that may date to 1870s | KATU

Crews began demolishing this home at 9134 N. Edison in Portland on Monday. (KATU Photo)

“They built this house, but this house was down on the river,” said Tanya March, who claims to know the home’s history. “We know it was moved up the hill in 1904.” The home had been added to over the years, perhaps hiding any historical uniqueness.

Source: Crews begin demolishing North Portland home that may date to 1870s | KATU

BMRA News June 2016

On October 31 of this year Portland plans to implement a policy requiring deconstruction on any demolition of a house or duplex which was built in 1916 or earlier.  Pre-1917 houses currently account for approximately one-third of the 300+ demolitions taking place in the city each year.

A number of BMRA members have been involved with the effort to develop, pass and implement a deconstruction ordinance in Portland.  BMRA member Sara Badiali, of the Reclamation Administration and also a member of the City of Portland Deconstruction Advisory Group touts the pioneering aspect of this effort:

“The City of Portland, Oregon’s Deconstruction Ordinance is unique as the very first in the world to lawfully require dismantling buildings for reuse. Its historical precedence lays the foundation for other laws to be created to close the loop in our building material waste streams. I am honored to be on the team that created the Deconstruction Ordinance and I am thrilled for the future of the planet.”

Source: BMRA News June 2016

Upcycle Oregon adds marketplace to May 21 festival

“The vision behind Upcycle Oregon is to draw our community and our home state together as thoughtful consumers and creative re-users,” Greene said. “It’s our goal that visitors who attend this free community event will leave with inspiration and practical ideas for making creative reuse a regular part of their lives.”

Source: Upcycle Oregon adds marketplace to May 21 festival

Nonproft rebuilding Portland homes amid affordable housing crisis | KGW.com

This month marks 25 years since the nonprofit began giving back to the community. Since it started, the group has repaired more than 1,200 homes, putting an estimated $20 million in market value back into the Portland metro area.

Malone said his organization has noticed a big increase in need over the last couple years, as Portland faces an affordable housing crisis. “The need is not going down by any means. If these people moved out, they couldn’t afford another house. Young families can’t afford to buy a house, let alone an elderly person. We are dealing with a lot of multiple family units living in one home, because the kids can’t even afford an apartment,” said Malone.

Source: Nonproft rebuilding Portland homes amid affordable housing crisis | KGW.com

Deconstruction Works Vermont & the Reclamation Administration in Portland!

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Erich Kruger of Deconstruction Works Vermont paid a visit to Schoolhouse Electric in Portland last weekend. Hanging in style with Sara Badiali of Reclamation Administration.

Posted by The Reclamation Administration on Tuesday, April 5, 2016

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Erich Kruger at Schoolhouse Electric in Portland, Oregon.

Wild Dome Home Repurposed From WWII Warship Scraps Asks $776K – Curbed

Built in 1978, the 2,400-square-foot house was the brainchild of Francisco Reynders, a Dutch artist, set designer, and mime who trained under the legendary French mime Marcel Marceau. According to Oregon Live, Reynders was inspired to build the home after finding discarded gun turret shrouds of an WWII aircraft carrier at a junkyard on the Willamette River. Reynders, no fan of regular boxy houses with sharp angles, set out to the create his “organically sensuous” dome home, and the shrouds ended up becoming the two smaller bedrooms and bathrooms—the holes for the warship’s cannons became the skylights.

Source: Wild Dome Home Repurposed From WWII Warship Scraps Asks $776K – Curbed

Jordan Schnitzer demands $1.3 million from city of Portland | OregonLive.com

Last year, city officials signed off on more money: an $8.6 million contract to demolish most of the old buildings on the property, pushing costs to nearly $22 million. Now, officials hope to recoup some of that. Soon, they’ll hire a broker to list one acre of land, which includes a 45,000-square-foot flour mill. Officials plan to require full restoration of the seven-story flour mill, and they’ll give developers an option to renovate a 21,500-squre-foot feed mill on site.

Plans for Centennial Mills are unclear after city officials said a proposal from Harsch Investment Properties isn’t financially viable. Crews began demolishing part of the property earlier this year. Brad Schmidt/The Oregonian

Source: Jordan Schnitzer demands $1.3 million from city of Portland | OregonLive.com

House Across from Eastmoreland Sequoias to be Torn Down | The Portland Chronicle

Photo credit: Portland Chronicle contributor

On Feb. 22 the Bureau of Development Services received an application for demolition of the 1937 home. The owners were listed as John and Terrie Marshall, the applicant was Kevin Partain of Urban Visions and the contractor was Renaissance Custom Homes LLC. Renaissance Custom Homes LLC is registered in Lake Oswego to Randy Sebastian. There are a number of trees on the site. A demolition plan is not yet available in the public record, so their fate is unconfirmed.

Source: House Across from Eastmoreland Sequoias to be Torn Down | The Portland Chronicle

Home demolitions affect air quality, too: Letters to the Editor | OregonLive.com

We need to hold the agencies and municipal leaders accountable and charge them with effective management of the public’s health. Manual deconstruction removes the risk by limiting exposure and should be mandatory when removing any residential structure.Don’t remain silent; add your voice to demand action now.

Source: Home demolitions affect air quality, too: Letters to the Editor | OregonLive.com

Deconstruction Resolution Unanimously Passes Portland City Council – Sara Badiali

For over a year I’ve been meeting with a group of Portlanders working on writing language to create a deconstruction resolution.

My fellow Deconstruction Advisory Group participants encompass salvage, deconstruction, builders, neighborhood coalitions, Portland City and Metro Regional Government representatives. We were effectively trying to do something that’s never been done before.

Many states and municipalities across the country have ordinances requiring construction and demolition debris to be diverted from landfills. Not one has ever used the language or required diversion to be done by deconstructing buildings.

Since 2011 I have been researching and posting on building material reuse. From my research I have created resource pages on Policies and Ordinances across the country. In five years I have never found deconstruction in any of the rules regarding waste diversion in the United States. Or Canada. Or Europe.

On Wednesday, February 17, 2016 – Portland made history!

Portland City Council approved the resolution that directs the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability to develop code language that requires projects seeking a demolition permit of a house or duplex to fully deconstruct that structure if it was built before 1916 or is a designated historic resource.

DAG Testimony

Sara Badiali Creator of the Reclamation Administration and Deconstruction Advisory Group Consultant, testifying for the passing of Portland’s Deconstruction Resolution.

 

“Today Portland became the first city in the country to ensure that the act of taking down the homes of our past has the least amount of impact on the environment and the surrounding neighbors,” said Portland Mayor Charlie Hales. “Keeping valuable materials out of the landfill reduces carbon emissions and gives people affordable options for fixing up their homes.”

Presentation by the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability. To see Sara Badiali testifying for Portland Mayor Charlie Hales start video at 2:45.

The resolution language and Portland’s Bureau of Planning and Sustainability press release.

Stay tuned for the article about my experience on the Deconstruction Advisory Group and testifying before Portland’s City Council. Congratulations Portland!

Salvaged tiny homestudio: tin can siding, paper bag wallpaper – YouTube

On a standard-sized lot in Portland, Oregon, self-taught builders Jeff and Brad built two tiny cottages using mostly salvaged materials. Each home is 364 square feet and with gabled roofs and front porches match the Victorian and Craftsman homes of the neighborhood, until you look closely.

via Salvaged tiny homestudio: tin can siding, paper bag wallpaper – YouTube.

Looptworks Upcycles Alaska Airline Seat Leather Into Eco-Chic Bags | Ecouterre

Looptworks, a Portland-based brand that transforms waste into new products, has partnered with Alaska Airlines to upcycle disused seat leather from its sister carrier, Horizon Air, into a series of wallets, laptop sleeves, tote and messenger bags, and cross-body purses.

via Looptworks Upcycles Alaska Airline Seat Leather Into Eco-Chic Bags | Ecouterre.

Petition · Save Old Portland · Change.org

I sold my beautiful 1904 home in North Portland in May. I was assured by the buyers that they planned to rent my home while they built a second or third structure in the backyard. I now find that they are planning (and probably always planned) to tear down the house. This house should not be a tear down. It is in beautiful condition with old growth fir floors, built in cabinets and many new upgrades to bath and kitchen. There should be a law that requires buyers to inform the sellers of their intentions in regard to the existing structures on the property. I had other offers that I would have taken if I had been informed of this buyer’s intentions. We are losing so much history with the destruction of these older homes. I am not opposed to new buildings, but not at the expense of what is still viable and oh so beautiful. There may not be time to save my house, but we can hopefully prevent more wanton destruction in the future.

via Petition · Save Old Portland · Change.org.

Business turns old wood into re-useful products

Rich Duncan Construction used Barnwood Natural woodsRich Duncan Construction used Barnwood Natural woods on walls and ceilings to add warmth and charm to the First Call Home Health building project.

“There is a lot of great material that we can use that uses a lot less energy and emits a lot less carbon,” Wadleigh said. “We like to design and build projects with what we have so that we are not taking down more trees and we are buying no plastic.”

Clients choose Barnwood Naturals partly because the wood is recycled and holds history, but also because the wood looks so much better than wood purchased now.

“The coloring is much different than new wood,” Wadleigh said. “Doug fir at the big box stores looks nothing like the old growth. There is a lot of character in this older wood.”

Barnwood Naturals warehouses a wide assortment of reclaimedBarnwood Naturals warehouses a wide assortment of reclaimed woods, mostly from the Pacific Northwest.

via Business turns old wood into re-useful products.

Momentum Building to Reduce Demolition Waste – Restore Oregon

Deconstruction (Photo courtesy City of Portland).Deconstruction (Photo courtesy City of Portland).

 

According to Portland Mayor Charlie Hales, “Our goal is to preserve neighborhood character and affordability by discouraging demolitions. But when buildings must come down, that work should still serve the public good. Taking apart buildings in a way that allows for salvaging valuable materials for reuse benefits our community, economy, and environment.”

via Momentum Building to Reduce Demolition Waste – Restore Oregon.

Portland to encourage more material reuse from demolitions – Portland Business Journal

The program looks to ensure more demolition materials are reused.

The program looks to ensure more demolition materials are reused. WENDY CULVERWELL

The awards would give $2,500 to those fully removing houses or duplexes within Portland. The money would only back those projects that employ deconstruction and reuse.

via Portland to encourage more material reuse from demolitions – Portland Business Journal.