Category Archives: Reuse Centers

Astoria nonprofit Big Reuse will close after 12 years due to rising rents – QNS.com

Big Reuse employees picking up construction materials slated to be thrown away.

“Salvage warehouses should be increasing, not decreasing with what we know about climate change and knowing that building materials make up the largest portion of our material waste,” she said.She said that the company is “really proud of the work we’re doing” and made great strides in terms of diverting waste from landfills and encouraging Queens residents to channel their “inner sustainable-ist.”

Source: Astoria nonprofit Big Reuse will close after 12 years due to rising rents – QNS.com

Salvage City to host building material pop-up market Saturday | Northwest Indiana Business Headlines | nwitimes.com

Steel City Salvage

“People probably have never seen anything like this,” Pytel said. “The real reason to come out is some of the beauty inside Gary’s structures that they may have passed over. There are endless possibilities with all the items that have been reclaimed.” Anyone who’s interested in more information should visit www.delta-institute.org or call Pytel at 312-554-0900.

Source: Salvage City to host building material pop-up market Saturday | Northwest Indiana Business Headlines | nwitimes.com

Owen ‘investing in the future by repurposing the past’ | Herald Citizen

John Owen talks about his passion for architectural salvage in his new shop, Dry Levee Architectural Salvage.
TY KERNEA | HERALD-CITIZEN

A lot of the items he’s salvaged have been leased for props in weddings. “That’s a trend that’s starting to really take off,” he said. Several school teachers also approached him asking about historic elements he has found. “It’s a hands-on tool for those kids,” he said. One of the first projects was the deconstruction of a log cabin that housed 10 children in the early 1900s. “It was a small cabin,” he said. “When we took it down, the grandson of one of those kids found me and asked what I did with it. He wanted us to rebuild it for him. So that’s what we did.”

Source: Owen ‘investing in the future by repurposing the past’ | Herald Citizen

Legacy Architectural Salvage hires assistant manager | WilmingtonBiz

Helms is passionate about promoting Legacy Architectural Salvage (LAS) as Wilmington’s source for reclaimed wood, doors, windows and other architectural salvage to use in the renovation and repair of older homes, according to a press release. She believes in the role of architectural salvage in environmental sustainability through the reuse and repurposing of historic salvage.

Source: Legacy Architectural Salvage hires assistant manager | WilmingtonBiz

Lawsuit says nonprofit Second Chance misled consumers – Baltimore Sun

“Second Chance and the appraisal company had a mountain of information about the IRS’ hostile view of the benefits that the defendants were promoting,” said Ugo Colella, a partner with Duane Morris, the law firm representing the plaintiffs. “The representations they were making were at best incomplete, and at worst, they were hiding this information to ensure the donors keep coming. Either way, the defendants withheld critical information from Maryland consumers.”

Source: Lawsuit says nonprofit Second Chance misled consumers – Baltimore Sun

Nothing In Nature Is Wasted: Reclaimed Wood | WXPR

Two national examples of this trend toward reclaimed wood are the Building Materials Reuse Association, which is a nonprofit educational organization with a mission to facilitate the salvage and reuse of building materials, and more locally, the Habitat for Humanity ReStores, which are retail outlets where used and surplus building materials are sold. Approximately 30% of sales are wood-based materials. Nationally, more than 55 million tons of wood waste is generated on an annual basis. About half of this material is of acceptable size, quality, and condition to be considered available for recovery. Clearly, the amount of waste wood available for recovery in the U.S. is a substantial figure.

Source: Nothing In Nature Is Wasted: Reclaimed Wood | WXPR

Meet the barrier-breaking woman behind a massive house of salvaged treasures – The Washington Post

Nancy Meyer finds boxes of expensive Italian tile on a shelf at Community Forklift. (Katherine Frey/The Washington Post)

Meyer’s part-time job eventually became a full-time mission to get the nonprofit off the ground. She negotiated with the landlord for a lower rent, cleaned up the store, created guidelines to standardize prices and designed internal structures that would make operations more efficient. Because Community Forklift couldn’t afford advertising, she launched a grass-roots marketing campaign to educate the community about environmental issues and promote the nonprofit. Community Forklift still hosts educational programs, including monthly arts festivals and DIY reuse workshops.

Source: Meet the barrier-breaking woman behind a massive house of salvaged treasures – The Washington Post

Community Forklift wins small business award from eBay, thanks to its mission and its fans | Hyattsville Life & Times

Community Forklift and its CEO Nancy J. Meyer won a SHINE Award from eBay in the Charitable Business category. Photo courtesy of Community Forklift

Community Forklift is a nonprofit reuse center for building materials, architectural salvage and antiques. The name refers to the organization’s mission “to lift up communities” in the DC area by turning the region’s construction waste stream into a resource stream. “These prizes will help us reach a larger online audience, which means we can do more good here in the DC region!” Meyer wrote on a blog post. “We can keep more materials out of landfills, provide more free materials to neighbors in need, and offer more green jobs to local residents.”

Source: Community Forklift wins small business award from eBay, thanks to its mission and its fans | Hyattsville Life & Times

Master of Special Problem Solving, Dave Bennink Disassembles 1,000 Buildings by Hand – Sara Badiali

 

Master of Special Problem Solving, Dave Bennink Disassembles 1,000 Buildings by Hand  

by Sara Badiali

Imagine you are packing your car for a trip. You can only move your gear once, but you still have to maximize space.  Sound difficult?  Now imagine you have to do it with a stranger’s gear.  That’s what Dave Bennink of Re-Use Consulting has been doing almost every week for the past 25 years.

But instead of gear, he does it with entire dismantled buildings.  Dave’s expertise is in disassembling structures, staging the components for transport, and then moving them to be resold.

Dave deconstructs buildings for reuse. He’s dismantled 1,000 structures, in 42 states and 4 providences. He is a master of spatial problem solving. The materials are so big and take up so much space on site that they can only be moved once.

Dave Bennink’s extensive knowledge and experience meant that when the City of Portland passed their new Deconstruction Ordinance, they asked Dave to train the City’s first Certified Deconstruction Contractors. They also tapped him to train and certify a new deconstruction workforce.

In addition to his own business dismantling structures, Dave is a certified Deconstruction Trainer for the Building Material Reuse Association. He’s done trainings for the City of Seattle, Vancouver, other municipalities, numerous small businesses and organizations.

 

Students are drilled in safety, technique, material recovery, recycling, diversion equations, staging and selling materials. All of the lessons take place in the actual building the students are deconstructing.

It is a common site to see Dave drawing out waste diversion calculations on the interior walls one day, and the next day the walls are gone.  If you ever buy reclaimed materials with calculations on them, you may have just purchased a piece of one of Dave’s many classrooms.

Along with his own business, and deconstruction training, Dave also is a consultant for reclaimed building material reuse start-ups. Guiding entrepreneurs with reuse business planning, deconstruction jobs, and marketing used building materials is Dave’s passion.

He is happy to help new converts into the world of environmental stewardship, job creation, community building, and healthy alternatives to demolition. His motto is “Say no to the track hoe”.

 

 

If you are interested in meeting Dave Bennink you can see him present twice at the Decon + Reuse ’17 Expo: Saving Our Past, Building the Future conference in Portland, Oregon on September 24th-27th. Dave will be on a panel with some of his certified deconstruction students. He will also be speaking on the basic principles of starting a reuse business (including spatial acumen).

Dave will be presenting at the Decon + Reuse ’17 Expo with over 50 other building material reuse experts, and hundreds of participants. This is the largest building material reuse event in the country and is being hosted by the City of Portland, Metro, the Reclamation Administration, and Portland State University’s Institute for Sustainable Solutions.

 

Dave Bennink owns and operates Re-Use Consulting, which you can find it at ReuseConsulting.com.  Or contact him at re-use@comcast.net or (360) 201-6977.

Something old, something new. (Re)using salvaged building materials | Metro

Mary Reese hunts for tile at the new Habitat for Humanity ReStore in Gresham.

Jacobson compares shopping for salvaged building materials to thrift or vintage shopping, and advises shopping early and often. “Stock changes from day to day and quantities can be limited,” he says. “The list of stores is growing and that makes it easier to find what you need, but the region’s supply chain for used building materials is still a work in progress” Also, he says, find a contractor willing to work with you, one who’s willing to deconstruct and salvage materials, as well as incorporate reused items into the new space.

Source: Something old, something new. (Re)using salvaged building materials | Metro

Decon + Reuse ’17 Speakers invited by the Reclamation Administration

The Reclamation Administration has made a lot of friends over the years.

We are proud to say that over a third of the speakers for Decon + Reuse ’17 Expo: Saving our Past, Building the Future are from our invitations. These presenters have all been featured on the Reclamation Administration going as far back as 2011!

Here is a list of Presenters brought to you by the Reclamation Administration.  You can see them all in Portland, Oregon on September 24th – 27th at the Decon + Reuse ’17 Expo.

James Lindberg

Detroit Audio Lab

Eco3d

Sons of Sawdust

ReCor Door 

Ohio Materials Marketplace

Louise McRae

Viridian Reclaimed Wood

Futel

The Rockford Brand

Miigwech Aki Deconstruction

Pioneer Millworks

Space Monkey Designs/Fantom Foundry

diederick kraaijeveld

Wallace Detroit Guitars

ReUse-apalooza offers new life for ‘junk,’ new jobs for workers, and new challenges for tinkerers – Insider – Story

David Rueve finished creating a new cabinet for the hi-fi and modernizing it more than a week before the ReUse-apalooza deadline. (Photo provided by David Rueve)

“It was a mess when I found it,” Rueve said of the hi-end RCA Victor cabinet hi-fi he recycled. “And it took some work. But now everything works — AM/FM/AFC, phono, tape (which is now set up for iPod, etc.), lights, all tone controls, all eight speakers,” Rueve said. “It sounds amazing. I mean really good.”

Source: ReUse-apalooza offers new life for ‘junk,’ new jobs for workers, and new challenges for tinkerers – Insider – Story

Scrap Exchange seeking to finish leasing of Lakewood building | The Herald Sun

Ann May Woodward, executive director of The Scrap Exchange, is photographed in Lakewood Shopping Center in March 2016. The Scrap Exchange plans to purchase 10 acres of the Shoppes at Lakewood center to establish a Reuse Arts District.

Ann May Woodward, executive director of The Scrap Exchange, is photographed in Lakewood Shopping Center in March 2016. The Scrap Exchange plans to purchase 10 acres of the Shoppes at Lakewood center to establish a Reuse Arts District. Kaitlin McKeown The Herald-Sun

A stable collection of paying tenants will bring more traffic to the shopping center, and allow The Scrap Exchange to implement other parts of the Reuse Arts District, Shark said. The Scrap Exchange is seeking to redevelop the Lakewood area without driving out the people who live there, one of the pitfalls of neighborhood improvement. The shopping center already is facing pressure from potential developers, particularly the southern part, which includes Food Lion and several other businesses.

Source: Scrap Exchange seeking to finish leasing of Lakewood building | The Herald Sun

Rejuvenation Opens NYC Store

Rejuvenation was founded to help customers restoring old houses, but most today spurn interiors that reference a single period or style. “We decided to help people live eclectically,” explains Alex Bellos, a West Elm veteran who is now senior vice president and general manager. “Designers are looking for unique pieces with a story behind them, and we have things they can build a room around.”

Source: Rejuvenation Opens NYC Store

Supportive housing, Collegetown apts up for review – The Ithaca Voice

Plans also call for an 8,100 SF warehouse for salvaged lumber/wood, and a 600 SF pavilion. 79 parking spaces are included in the project. For those unfamiliar, Finger Lakes ReUse (FLR) is a local non-profit focusing on materials recycling and sustainability. The organization has “deconstruction crews” who take apart buildings by hand, salvaging reusable building materials (which can be up to 70% of a building) for sale at FLR’s stores on Old Elmira Road, and at the Triphammer Mall in Lansing.

Source: Supportive housing, Collegetown apts up for review – The Ithaca Voice

Innowood introduces Recycling and Replacement Service to Combat Construction Waste | Architecture And Design

Every industry has a part to play in climate change and the construction industry is no different. In a 2011 report on construction and demolition waste, it was reported that ‘buildings and their users are responsible for almost a quarter of Australia’s greenhouse emissions’, of which ‘choice of materials and design principles has a significant […] impact on the energy required to construct a building.’

Approximately 42 per cent of solid waste in Australia is generated in the building industry. Waste in the construction industry affects everyone and the importance of re-using and recycling this waste cannot be emphasised enough.

Source: Innowood introduces Recycling and Replacement Service to Combat Construction Waste | Architecture And Design

Reclamation Project: Lifecycle Building Center celebrates purchase of facility – Atlanta INtown Paper

“Improving the functionality of the space will help LBC increase our impact – more materials diverted from landfills, more dollars saved by our customers, more free materials to nonprofits, and more community support through education/outreach,” LBC Executive Director Shannon Goodman said.Lifecycle executive director Shannon Goodman. LBC is a five-year old nonprofit that removes reusable building materials – like cabinets, hardwood flooring, doors, windows and appliances – from demolition and renovation projects. In 2016, LBC captured one million pounds of usable materials from the waste stream.

Lifecycle executive director Shannon Goodman.

Source: Reclamation Project: Lifecycle Building Center celebrates purchase of facility – Atlanta INtown Paper

Citizen Carpentry Community Workshop & Tool Share by Marcis Curtis — Kickstarter

We need your help to finish building out our shop in its new location. We share building space with Refab STL, an amazing non-profit providing skills training to former combat veterans by deconstructing old buildings in and around St. Louis. These materials are then processed and stored for resale in the historic 40,000 square foot building along Route 66, which houses Citizen Carpentry’s new workshop. Citizen Carpentry aims to be the first worker-owned woodworking co-operative of its kind in the Midwest, encouraging community members, artists, and entrepreneurs to utilize our shop for their work. We have the chance to be a hub of creative revitalization, recycling, and skill-sharing in a city sorely lacking in opportunities.

Source: Kickstarter Citizen Carpentry Community Workshop & Tool Share

Nonprofit’s founder has 2 missions: Save history, help veterans | Metro | stltoday.com

The nonprofit Refab does sustainable deconstruction

ReFab Founder Eric Scharz. Photo by J.B. Forbes.

Schwarz’s experience had taught him that in an increasingly imitative world, some people hungered for an authenticity conceived in the marriage of age and use.

He founded Refab, a salvage yard in south St. Louis, in a condemned building four years ago. At the time, he had about $3,000 in his pocket and an idea for salvaging discarded building materials and turning around the lives of veterans. Today, Schwarz leases a 40,000-square-foot warehouse off Gravois Avenue and employs 14 people. His budget for 2017 is $1.2 million. That growth is partly attributable to a backlash against the uniformity produced by globalization.

The customers who frequent this two story red-brick repository of rescued material are weary of seeing the same furniture, the same sinks and the same light fixtures — all of it mass-produced on the other side of the planet. “You go into a lot of houses — and I don’t know if we coined the phrase — but they are all ‘Lowes’d up,’” said Randy Miller, who was looking for material for his coffee shop in Southern Illinois. “This is a like a candy store.”

Source: Nonprofit’s founder has 2 missions: Save history, help veterans | Metro | stltoday.com

General Motors, Herman Miller team up on $1M furniture recycling project | MLive.com

GM has partnered with Herman Miller and Green Standards to manage tens of thousands of office surplus furniture and equipment resulting from renovations at Warren Technical Center, Milford Proving Ground, and Global Headquarters. (Courtesy of Herman Miller)

The Toronto-based environmental firm Green Standards, which will clean up the mostly used Herman Miller furniture and donate them to a 100 non-profit organizations. The project is expected to take two years.

“We view waste as just a resource out of place,” said David Tulauskas, GM’s sustainability director, in a statement. “This reuse program enables us to reduce our environmental footprint while making a positive contribution to our community.”

So far, GM has diverted 550 tons of office materials from the landfill through the rePurpose program, equal to growing nearly 46,000 tree seedlings for 10 years or offsetting electricity use from nearly 250 homes for one year.

Source: General Motors, Herman Miller team up on $1M furniture recycling project | MLive.com

How Creative Repurposing of Industrial Scrap Is Holding Off a Neighborhood’s Gentrification by Amanda Abrams — YES! Magazine

Ann Woodward, executive director of the Scrap Exchange, stands before the strip mall and parking lot that the organization now owns.

The Scrap Exchange is on the brink of something much bigger. This summer, the organization closed on a deal to buy 10 acres of a moribund strip mall surrounding the building. Executive director Ann Woodward’s ambition is to turn the area into a “reuse arts district,” unlike any in the country. It will include a range of creative elements, like a playground made of reused materials, a shipping container mall hosting local entrepreneurs, a recycle-a-bike program, artists’ studios, and a performance space.

Source: How Creative Repurposing of Industrial Scrap Is Holding Off a Neighborhood’s Gentrification by Amanda Abrams — YES! Magazine

Thrift stores for building materials ride the re-use wave – StarTribune.com

Nick Swaggert, of Better Futures, said the work he and his company do has “saved 700 tons of building materials from going into the landfill.”

With many homes over 30, trend experts expect homeowners to tackle remodeling projects as long as the economy remains strong. Thrift stores such as Habitat ReStores, now at 875 locations nationwide and 15 in Minnesota, are riding the wave too. Sales at the new location, which opened in September, are exceeding expectations. “Our New Brighton store is doing $1 million a year, and we hope the Minneapolis store will match that in two or three years,” said Pete O’Keefe, senior manager of operations at Twin Cities Habitat for Humanity.

Source: Thrift stores for building materials ride the re-use wave – StarTribune.com

century-old homes saved from demolitions | KATU

North Portland’s Rebuilding Center – KATU photo

“All of us are pro-urban density, we all understand the concept, but you can’t make these changes this fast and give nothing back to the communities who are there in the first place,” said Seward, “If Portland doesn’t pony up, it may already be too late.” Moretti hopes in the future, the city will consider including homes built in the 20’s and 30’s.

Source: century-old homes saved from demolitions | KATU

The art of deconstruction | Local News | heraldandnews.com

Reba VanAcker and her son Christopher Green. By Gerry O’Brien H&N Editor

 

When Green put the word out on the Internet that DoubleHead had well-preserved timber from the 1930s to the 1960s, a group of Japanese buyers jumped on it. “They flew out here and were overwhelmed at what we had,” Green said. As it turns out, Japanese love all things from the West. The Japanese reproduce vintage-style door handles, lamps, clothing, etc. They use our lumber for flooring, wall coverings, doors and furniture.” “It was like watching kids in a candy store. They were literally running from place to place. We sold them four container loads of flooring,” Green said, mainly two- by 12-foot slats.

Source: The art of deconstruction | Local News | heraldandnews.com

This bar may not be art, but it is an inspiring reuse | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

A closeup view of the maple top of a bar that Dave Matline and Dave Baldonieri made from an old bowling alley. It was a special award winner in the Reuse Inspiration Contest.

Knowing that Mr. Baldonieri had once used bowling alley wood to make a work bench, Mr. Matlin was delighted to find pieces of maple lanes for sale at Construction Junction, a nonprofit retailer of salvaged and surplus building materials in Point Breeze. But none were quite right for the project. Then he discovered more damaged sections on the loading dock — for free! “We started hacking and whacking,” Mr. Matlin said. “It worked out better than I thought it would.”

Source: This bar may not be art, but it is an inspiring reuse | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Duo works toward a greener future

John Steinbeck and Dusty VanRenan Green Rivers Recycling LLC.

“Old-growth lumber is lumber that is so old that the trees that were here when the settlers first came or what they used or milled for building materials. It’s a very dense wood, impervious to termites and it’s highly sought after by a lot of builders throughout the country,” he said. “You’re also preserving these old buildings, which is really important to some of the farmers and owners around here. The building obviously can’t stay, but at least the materials that their forefathers used to erect these structures can still prove to be preserved and not just wasted by going through a landfill and being burned.”

Source: Duo works toward a greener future

Habitat For Humanity withdraws from observatory deconstruction project – Mission City Record

“I myself am heartbroken that this observatory is being taken down. We did not realize that some people would be upset with us trying to help recycle some of the material instead of it just being disposed of. We only are allowed to use new material for our builds, we sell recycled material at our ReStores to help us build affordable housing. “To set the record straight we have been working on affordable housing with the city for over a year. Due to the concerns put forward we will withdraw our service of helping to recycle the material when it is disposed of.”

Source: Habitat For Humanity withdraws from observatory deconstruction project – Mission City Record

Detroit group that salvages homes is recovering after fire | The Merced Sun-Star

FILE - In a Feb. 28, 2013 file photo, workers at Reclaim Detroit salvage wood that was taken from abandon homes in the city and making them useful for other projects, in Detroit. Reclaim Detroit, that gives new life to wood, doors and antique fixtures salvaged from deserted homes is getting its own revival. With no strings attached, Reclaim Detroit said it has received a $100,000 grant after a fire destroyed a workshop, tools and wood saved from more than 100 houses. (Mandi Wright/Detroit Free Press via AP) DETROIT NEWS OUT; MAGS OUT; NO SALES /Detroit Free Press via AP) DETROIT NEWS OUT; TV OUT; MAGS OUT; NO SALES; MANDATORY CREDIT DETROIT FREE PRESS

FILE – In a Feb. 28, 2013 file photo, workers at Reclaim Detroit salvage wood that was taken from abandon homes in the city and making them useful for other projects, in Detroit. Reclaim Detroit, that gives new life to wood, doors and antique fixtures salvaged from deserted homes is getting its own revival. With no strings attached, Reclaim Detroit said it has received a $100,000 grant after a fire destroyed a workshop, tools and wood saved from more than 100 houses. (Mandi Wright/Detroit Free Press via AP)

Read more here: http://www.mercedsunstar.com/news/business/article87468137.html#storylink=cpy

Reclaim Detroit operated at a large warehouse in Highland Park that was destroyed by fire in February. It hopes to open a new mill shop this summer, thanks to Open Road, which provided the largest grant. “Our ability to earn money was imperiled by the fire. … We lost a lot of antique doors and handles. We lost all of the circular saws, ladders, pickaxes. You name it, we lost it,” Dundon said. “Insurance didn’t cover all the losses. It’s extremely difficult for the insurance market to value salvage materials.”

Source: Detroit group that salvages homes is recovering after fire | The Merced Sun-Star

Event: ReUse-apalooza

ReUse-apalooza – Photo: Provided

This sustainable soirée brings customers, designers and local leaders together to celebrate the power of renewability. Featuring light bites, My Nose Turns Red circus performers and entertainment by Sexy Time Live Band Karaoke, ReUse-apalooza is the annual fundraiser of Building Value, a nonprofit that salvages reusable building materials for public sale.

Source: Event: ReUse-apalooza

Farmer finds fit with salvage business

Wood Salvage

Aaron Williams stores reclaimed barnwood for his business, Willow Architectural Salvage. He says for every one barn where the wood is salvaged, another 100 are burned or bulldozed. Photos courtesy Aaron Williams.

He has been growing the Willow Architectural Salvage business ever since. “It still allows me to farm,” says Williams, who grows corn and soybeans near Waverly about 30 miles south of Springfield. “Being a farmer, I understand farm families. It’s a good fit,” he says of the business. HOWEVER, DESPITE the popularity of barn wood today, a surprising amount of barns are wasted. “For every one that we salvage about 100 get burned or bulldozed,” Williams says. Some of those barns were built 150 years ago for livestock and when equipment was smaller. Such buildings are expensive to maintain.

Source: Farmer finds fit with salvage business

Architectural salvage gives a home some character

AlbanyRadiators

Old-time radiators are common items seen at salvage shops like Historic Albany Parts Warehouse. (Photo: Provided)

In honor of Earth Day on April 22, consider purchasing used items that promote the motto of the three Rs: reduce, re-use and recycle. By incorporating architectural salvage items into your next project, you not only keep usable items out of the landfill, but you can also add a bit of history into your own home at significant savings..

ReHouse door plates

ReHouse Architectural Salvage in Rochester has a variety of door plates and other items from older homes upstate. (Photo: Provided)

Source: Architectural salvage gives a home some character

Recycled Art Contest | Milwaukee Habitat for Humanity

ReStore’s 7th Annual Recycled Art Contest shines a light on some of Milwaukee’s resourceful repurposers. The contest challenges the public to create works primarily using the donated product found at ReStore. From artwork to repurposed furniture, the only rule of the contest is the majority of materials must be purchased at ReStore.

Displaying 20.jpg11

 

With 34 entries to choose from, the works are judged by the public with polling stations in store and online HERE. The top five vote getters will receive ReStore shopping sprees. As for the artists, they range from professionals like Debby Koenig of Earthfire Artistry (entry 20) to group art classes from the Milwaukee Center for Independence.

Winners will be revealed during the Third Ward’s Gallery Night, April 15th at ReStore East (5pm-9pm). The entire exhibit will be featured in the Historic Third Ward’s Gallery Night & Day, April 15th & 16th at Restore East (420 S 1st, Milwaukee), with many of the works for sale to the public.

 

Source: Recycled Art Contest | Milwaukee Habitat for Humanity

REvision Division Reduces Waste by Thinking Outside the Box – WhatcomTalk

Design and Build masterminds Matt Vaughn (L) and David Spangler (R) unleash their creativity in each furniture piece. Photo courtesy: REvision Division.

“Eberhard’s influence helped us shift from a value-added mindset to actively pursuing difficult-to-divert materials from the waste stream — shifting the focus to education outreach and behavior change,” Gisclair notes. “We wanted people to see the value and what the possibilities are to repurpose materials that are widely perceived as trash — wooden or flooring shorts, frame pieces, things that we wouldn’t normally accept at the RE Store.”

Source: REvision Division Reduces Waste by Thinking Outside the Box – WhatcomTalk

See What Artists-in-Residence at a Trash Dump Create | Atlas Obscura

The idea originated with artist and environmentalist Jo Hanson. After creating her own art with trash and assisting with campaigns such as city-wide street sweepings, in the late 1980s Hanson approached Recology about a program where artists could reuse materials from the dump. At around the same time, San Francisco was implementing new recycling laws, and looking for ways to raise awareness about waste. The artist-in-residence program fit that bill.

Source: See What Artists-in-Residence at a Trash Dump Create | Atlas Obscura

Racine man turns old into new to help Habitat for Humanity

Habitat For Humanity volunteer Dan Mundell shows off the piano bar he created at Habitat ReStore, 2300 DeKoven Ave. Mundell has made a half-dozen creations out of donated items for ReStore. GREGORY SHAVER, gregory.shaver@journaltimes.com

So far, Mundell has assembled a half dozen creations for ReStore, including a recent re-imagining of a bar using the pieces an old, donated piano. “I’m just doing this for the fun of it,” Mundell said. “I have never sold anything for myself. The things I do are for my family and the ReStore. It’s great fun to make these things and I get a lot of satisfaction in knowing that I’m helping out how I can.”

Source: Racine man turns old into new to help Habitat for Humanity

Picking Indiana: Couple’s salvage barn increasingly popular

Customers lined up at the door for the 10 a.m. opening. Customers pored over antique items at a once a month sale at the Small Town Salvage store in Bargersville Sunday January 17, 2016. Rob Goebel/Daily Journal

Small Town Salvage is a monthly pop-up event outside of Bargersville, bringing hundreds of people to scour their displays and bins looking for the perfect accent for their homes. Their popularity has stemmed from the increasingly trendy concept of up-cycling the old into something new. “We have to go out and physically hunt for this stuff. We’re looking for the barns, driving around the country, cold-picking,” Obergfell Gindling said.

Source: Picking Indiana: Couple’s salvage barn increasingly popular

West End Salvage to Host Multiple NBC Programming During Caucuses | whotv.com

“We’re planning on staying open, I don’t think it’s fair to just shut our store down,” he said. “And they were sensitive to that, as well. The shows will be airing – both ‘Meet the Press’ and ‘NBC Nightly News’ then the ‘Today Show’ and ‘Nightly News’ – all of those will be airing while we’re closed. So we wouldn’t be open when they’re actually filming them. But during the day, there’s just going to be a lot of chaos here. And I think it’ll be fun for people to have a chance to come down here and see how things work on a broader scale.”

Source: West End Salvage to Host Multiple NBC Programming During Caucuses | whotv.com

Old Town Bluffton buildings incorporating reclaimed materials | The Island Packet

a barn deconstructed by Tom Banach of Hardeeville. On average, about 50 to 60 percent of a structure's materials can be used in a new home.

A barn deconstructed by Tom Banach of Hardeeville. On average, about 50 to 60 percent of a structure’s materials can be used in a new home. Submitted photos by Tom Banach

“We’re taking the material from the grassroots of a barn, and we’re re-utilizing every portion of that barn,” Banach said. His company, TimberStone Antique Building Products, has seen an uptick in business as more people seek materials with a story in new construction.

Source: Old Town Bluffton buildings incorporating reclaimed materials | The Island Packet

Maarten Gielen of Belgium’s Rotor Deconstruction Collective to Deliver Keynote Address at the Decon ’16 Conference

Decon16-logo-bannerEagele

 

Chicago, IL – January 13th, 2016 – The Building Materials Reuse Association (BMRA) is excited to announce that Maarten Gielen of Belgium’s innovative Rotor Deconstruction will be featured as the keynote speaker for the Decon ’16 conference on March 1st 2016 in Raleigh, North Carolina.

 

Decon ’16 is the premier national conference for professionals in the building material deconstruction and reuse industries, and this international address will ensure that the reused material economy can grow in concert worldwide. This lecture is made possible through the support of Archeworks, a Chicago-based multidisciplinary design school with a social agenda.

Maarten Gielen is designer, manager, and researcher of the Brussels-based collective Rotor, comprised of people sharing a common interest in material flows in industry and construction – at the 2nd Holcim Roundtable held in Einsiedeln, Switzerland (2015).

Founded in 2005, Rotor is a group of architects, designers and other professionals interested in material flows in industry and construction, particularly in relation to resources, waste, use and reuse. Rotor disseminates creative strategies for salvage and waste reduction through workshops, publications, and exhibitions. They represented Belgium at the 12th International Architecture Exhibition of the Venice Biennial in 2010. Maarten Gielen is a founding member of the collective Rotor where he currently works as designer, manager and researcher.

Decon Expo is the biennial conference of the Building Materials Reuse Association. An international gathering of deconstruction and reuse practitioners, it is the premier event for the reused building materials marketplace. This year, the conference is located in Raleigh, North Carolina, home to one of the largest Habitat for Humanity Restore deconstruction teams as well as the North Carolina State College of Natural Resources.

The conference will feature speakers and attendees from around the world to exchange best practices, share case studies, and inspire greater diversions of construction and demolition waste towards productive markets.

In the words of one attendee “If I only get to come to one conference, it’s Decon. The quality of sessions and the passion of the participants is unbeatable.”

Continue reading Maarten Gielen of Belgium’s Rotor Deconstruction Collective to Deliver Keynote Address at the Decon ’16 Conference

BMRA News, January 2016 – Decon ’16 Update

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DECON ’16 Update

Time is drawing closer to the DECON ’16 conference and expo in Raleigh, North Carolina, February 29 – March 3.  If you have not yet registered, make your plans and get started here.  There will be speakers providing the latest research and hottest topics in building deconstruction, salvage and building materials reuse.  This is an opportunity to network with others in this field that only comes every couple of years, so we urge you to take advantage of it.  Register now!

The conference program is coming together, accepted speakers are being posted on a rolling basis.

An exciting class is planned for the days just after the main conference.  Added Value: A Hands-on Guide to Setting up your Reclaimed Wood Shop.  The BMRA has partnered with the Department of Forest Biomaterials at North Carolina State University to develop the ideal course to get your reclaimed woodshop up and running. This 1.5 day course will run on Thursday March 2nd (9-5) and Friday March 3rd (9-3), with plenty of time on Friday evening to catch your flight home.

Full details available here.

via BMRA News, January 2016.

Parts of demolished Belleview Biltmore will live on – Story | FOX 13 Tampa Bay

“I’ve been there before, I spent my teen years in Clearwater and I know that it has historical significance” she said. “I’m attracted to architectural artifacts- salvage, for the history that it brings, that it could potentially could bring to my home.”

via Parts of demolished Belleview Biltmore will live on – Story | FOX 13 Tampa Bay.

Project RE uses reclaimed materials to restore lives | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Steve Shelton from the Trade Institute of Pittsburgh stands in front of paneling of reused woods built by his students.

Project RE, is a social enterprise in which trainees and apprentices in the building trades work alongside budding architects making prototypes and products with reclaimed materials in the back of Construction Junction at 214 N. Lexington St. in North Point Breeze. (The RE stands for reuse materials, rebuild communities, restore lives.)

Mr. Shelton, founder of the Trade Institute of Pittsburgh, calls it “a think tank with tools.”

Project RE accumulated $2.3 million in grants from four foundations and Ford Motor Co. support to build a mobile fabrication lab, which is used in the wood shop and as an educational tool in neighborhoods.

via Project RE uses reclaimed materials to restore lives | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

Construction Junction’s painted doors use jokes to promote recycling | TribLIVE

The Point Breeze-based warehouse for used building materials has teamed up with MARC USA for a year-long “The Environment Is No Joke” campaign, which puts goofy knock-knock jokes on doors that were donated to Construction Junction, then decorated by local artists. Five such featured doors — including a work in progress with a video screen and digital experience — will be displayed throughout Downtown’s Cultural District during Highmark First Night Pittsburgh on New Year’s Eve.

via Construction Junction’s painted doors use jokes to promote recycling | TribLIVE.

REUSE CENTERS: WAYS TO OPTIMIZE PARTNERSHIPS SERIES – ARTIST RESIDENCIES– BY SARA BADIALI

Artist Residencies is the final installment of articles about partnership optimization for the building material reuse community. See the entire series here

 

Reuse Centers: Ways to Optimize Partnerships Series

Artist Residencies

Art starts with raw materials and reuse centers are brimming with materials waiting to be reused.  Thus, reuse centers are filled with unrealized art.  What better way to showcase this potential than with an artist in residency?  By sponsoring an artist to commit acts of creativity, reuse centers can show off inventory and potential use in unique ways.  Recology is an artist in residency program at the Recology Solid Waste and Transfer Station in San Francisco, California. This program has sponsored over 100 artists since 1990.  Artists have unlimited access to inventory and even studio space provided by the transfer station.  Artists are required to speak to elementary school students and tour groups about using reclaimed materials and there is a two day gala event for the unveiling of the finished artwork.

There are unlimited ways to partner with artists.  The key is to find a good balance between experience, education, and the deliverable product.  Some residency programs require the artist to donate the end piece to a gallery for permanent display.  Other organizations hold an auction for the final product and use the proceeds for funding purposes.  The unveiling, gala, or celebration for art is an important event.  Reuse centers are utilitarian by nature, so to express the value of a beautiful creation make sure the party is off site and fancy.

Fine art is one type of reuse possibility, but reuse centers that carry wood will benefit from craftspeople who make custom furniture.  For many people the desirability of having a custom piece of furniture by an artist, is a chance to own an heirloom.  Reclaimed wood from a local landmark or historical building that is crafted into furniture, is a functional piece of history. When done beautifully these pieces really are unique, valuable for both their craft and their connection to place and time.

Partnering with artists and craftspeople in residency programs can facilitate unlimited opportunities.  The benefits of partnership include supporting local craftsmen and burgeoning artists, but also funding opportunities.  Art organizations have loyal patrons because many people feel strongly about supporting the arts. Reuse centers are in the excellent position of supplying materials for art, but also education in both craft and reuse.  An organization that combines collaboration with artists, providing education, environmental benefits, and supporting the local economy in jobs and goods, is a great investment for funders.  In many cases a reuse center can adopt an arts program with little administrative or policy changes, and the value is limitless.

 

 Consulting

The Reclamation Administration is a great databank for reuse centers collaborative partnerships.  There are a few that stand out as particularly successful models.  Partnerships are an excellent way to get exposure, marketing, materials, and revenue, while supporting the local community.

Contact me if you are interested in learning more on collaborative partnerships for your reuse outlet.

Design build social venture Project RE launches with big goals in North Point Breeze – Pittsburgh Business Times

From left to right: Steve Shelton, executive director of the Trade Institute of Pittsburgh; John Folan, professor of architecture at Carnegie Mellon University; and Mike Gable, executive director of Construction Junction.From left to right: Steve Shelton, executive director of the Trade Institute of Pittsburgh: John Folan, professor of architecture at Carnegie Mellon University; and Mike Gable, executive director of Construction Junction.

With $2.3 million in funding support from organizations that include the Heinz Endowments and the Colcom and RK Mellon foundations, Project RE launches as a 10,000 square foot production facility within Construction Junction in which architecture students within the UDBS work with the apprentice laborers from the Trade Institute of Pittsburgh, which operates a few blocks away, to design and build new affordable housing and other prototype products out of reused materials collected by neighboring retail operation.

via Design build social venture Project RE launches with big goals in North Point Breeze – Pittsburgh Business Times.