Category Archives: Reuse Design

BottomFeeder and Garbage Fish

I just finished reading BottomFeeder: How to eat Ethically in a World of Vanishing Seafood by Taras Grescoe.  I fancy myself well informed when it comes to oceanic issues and the health of the world’s oceans (focusing mostly on garbage gyres).  But I was blown away by how much I didn’t know about the state of the world’s fish!  Environmental reporting literature usually sends me into a spiral of species-hatred (my own), depression and finally lingering guilt.  However, Grescoe has accomplished what other reporters have missed, which is to leave me feeling informed and eager to try out my newly uploaded knowledge about seafood.  For example, I will eat more sardines, anchovies, mackerel and smaller mid-level zone fish.  I will never touch another can of tuna, unless the world governments and fishing industry make some serious changes.  That is not to say that BottomFeeder isn’t a powerful book full of stories that will depress you about both fish and people.  But the information is balanced out by the notion that you can immediately address your impact – become a bottom feeder.

To celebrate my newly acquired knowledge, I present to you two artists work of garbage sculptures of fish, which I found on a great site called Recycleart.org

yukari1 Rubbish fish art : Yodogawa Technique

yukari2 Rubbish fish art : Yodogawa Technique

yukari3 Rubbish fish art : Yodogawa Technique

Artists Hideaki Shibata and Kazuya Matsunaga came together in 2003 as Yodogawa Technique to create works from the rubbish and miscellaneous objects found along Osaka’s Yodogawa River. Working with discarded consumer goods and driftwood, the crafty duo made sculptural pieces that are like physical collages and that initially do not even appear as if they are made from garbage.

++ Yukari Art Contemporary

ReUse Haus, a miniature dwelling made with used materials, on display at AltBuild | L.A. at Home | Los Angeles Times

ReuseHaus1

When it comes to green building, energy efficiency gets most of the attention. If reused building materials are discussed, it’s usually in context of de-construction, not re-construction using materials from demolished or remodeled homes.

The ReUse Haus on display at the AltBuild Expo running through Saturday in Santa Monica focuses on the reconstruction. The mini house, left, is meant to show that a recycled home “doesn’t have to look like a tree house,” said Ted Reiff, co-founder of the Oakland-based deconstruction firm the Reuse People.

via ReUse Haus, a miniature dwelling made with used materials, on display at AltBuild | L.A. at Home | Los Angeles Times.

T.O.M.T. Refitting the Planet

In the mail today I found The Other Man’s Treasures waiting for me.  T.O.M.T. is a studio located in New York.  Reuse inspiration never came in a cooler package!

T.O.M.T.™ (or The Other Man’s Treasures) is the best friend for trashed or forgotten objects and anything else you might throw away or overlook in your garages, pantries and other storage spaces.

Because of this orientation, T.O.M.T.™ has been referred to as a recycling company on occasion.

Well … we see ourselves as more than that, and something altogether different. Beyond bags of bottles and cans, beyond the corrugated cardboard boxes tied with string, beyond the papers and organic waste bins, lies a whole world of objects that are discarded with no regard. We find these objects, considered too “difficult” to recycle, all over this great city of Gotham. Our vigilante mission has been to recover and reassign the purpose of these objects. T.O.M.T.™ is our abandoned-object Batcave, and the endeavor of refitting the planet™ is already underway. The key to saving these forgotten objects is just keeping our eyes open and being open and ready to spot what we like to call “objects of desire” – old appliances, tires, whatever! We at T.O.M.T.™ like to think that we’re giving old junk and ordinary objects a new lease on life. In fact, after they’ve gotten the T.O.M.T.™ treatment, these objects take center stage as useful, beautiful, “high-end” furnishings. “It’s time for some of this stuff to live in the limelight!” says Trice. “No object has been neglected too long, been tossed too far or is too ordinary to be a star.” We don’t promise to know what to do with every misplaced object out there in the world, but we do believe there is some purpose to everything. Nothing is truly garbage. That’s fundamental to our philosophy. via About T.O.M.T..

T.O.M.T Refrigerator Door Dressing Mirror (one of my favorites!)