Category Archives: State of the Oceans

World Fishing & Aquaculture – Upcycling fisheries byproducts

Tidal Vision has launched its introductory line of aquatic leather products - Alaska salmon leather walletsTidal Vision has launched its introductory line of aquatic leather products – Alaska salmon leather wallets.

“Two billion pounds of seafood byproducts are thrown away each year in Alaska,” said Tidal Vision founder and CEO, Craig Kasberg. “By developing new technologies to upcycle these byproducts, Tidal Vision is looking to add value to sustainable fisheries, reduce waste, and provide quality consumer products such as durable salmon leather wallets and, later, Chitoskin™ textiles.”

via World Fishing & Aquaculture – Upcycling fisheries byproducts.

Plastics at sea create raft of problems | Science News for Students

piece of plastic from oceanA piece of plastic scooped from the North Atlantic Ocean. It shows the tell-tale bite marks of a fish. A new study estimates how much plastic floats throughout the world’s oceans — trash that puts many marine creatures at risk.

The researchers found that more than half of the weight of all ocean plastics is made up of such tiny pieces. This discovery concerned the team because smaller particles have a greater surface area. This allows them to absorb more pollution per unit weight than larger pieces will.

via Plastics at sea create raft of problems | Science News for Students.

Fashion from fishing nets – PRAGUE POST | The Voice of Prague

Jacket from the 2014 catalog of EcoAlf. Photo: EcoAlf

To make recycled nylon from old fishing nets, EcoAlf works with organizations in Asia and Spain that collect ocean rubbish. “There’s a whole process of collecting and cleaning, which is difficult as [the nets] come mixed with a lot of other materials. Once they have been cleaned and cut, they are processed to create yarn,” says Múgica.

via Fashion from fishing nets – PRAGUE POST | The Voice of Prague.

The dried-up Aral Sea is now a post-apocalyptic playground | Grist

Moynaq, Uzbekistan

The good news is that if you’re a child in southwestern Kazakhstan or northern Uzbekistan, you have access to a creepy, apocalyptic playground that your parents never did. The dry wasteland where the Aral Sea once teemed with fish is now scattered with abandoned cargo vessels and derelict ship wreckage. And boy, are they fun for a game of hide-and-go-seek.

via The dried-up Aral Sea is now a post-apocalyptic playground | Grist.

Waste To Waves Recycling Program Gives Foam A Second, Ocean-Friendlier Life

foam ocean

Michael Stewart, co-founder of Sustainable Surf (a San Francisco nonprofit), discovered this sad reality over years of participating in California beach clean ups. Tired of seeing this type of plastic trash in and around the ocean, Stewart and Sustainable Surf’s other co-founder Kevin Whilden started the Waste to Waves program, which aims to recycle styrofoam packaging back into new products — most notably, surfboards.

surfboard shaper

via Waste To Waves Recycling Program Gives Foam A Second, Ocean-Friendlier Life.

Reducing Waste Plastic & Poverty Around the World Through The Plastic Bank – YouTube

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TbwIhqkkkwo&w=854&h=510]

It’s our mission to clean up the ocean and planet by ensuring that anyone can collect enough plastics to permanently ascend from poverty.

The Plastic Bank is a plastics return, repurposing, and 3D printing center strategically located in areas around the world with both an abundance of plastic waste & poverty.

Our self-sustaining business model empowers the poor to harvest plastics as a currency for various opportunities including education, training, necessities and 3D printing services.

We call the plastics harvested by the poor or removed from our oceans & waterways ‘social plastics’ and it is our goal to lead the movement towards the worldwide demand for the use of social plastics in everyday products. The higher the worldwide demand becomes, the higher the reward will be for harvesting social plastics.

via Reducing Waste Plastic & Poverty Around the World Through The Plastic Bank – YouTube.

Eelpocalypse: Tens of thousands of dead eels wash up on Guangdong beaches, nobody knows why… : TreeHugger

Eels, are one of the coolest animals on the planet. Which is why they get an honorary post on the RA today.

Now it’s eels’ turn, it seems. According to a report by Sina.com (translated by Google), residents report that tens of thousands of dead eels have washed up on the shores of Guangdong.

China eels

via Eelpocalypse: Tens of thousands of dead eels wash up on Guangdong beaches, nobody knows why… : TreeHugger.

Researchers study 18,000 hours of deep sea footage, find ocean seafloor is covered in trash : TreeHugger

Ocean seafloor trash

In total, the researchers counted over 1,500 observations of deep-sea debris, at dive sites from Vancouver Island to the Gulf of California, and as far west as the Hawaiian Islands. In the recent paper, the researchers focused on seafloor debris in and around Monterey Bay—an area in which MBARI conducts over 200 research dives a year. In this region alone, the researchers noted over 1,150 pieces of debris on the seafloor. (source)

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mOZngsJU2k0?feature=player_embedded&w=640&h=360]

via Researchers study 18,000 hours of deep sea footage, find ocean seafloor is covered in trash : TreeHugger.

TRASHED trailer (2012) – Environmental documentary with Jeremy Irons – YouTube

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7UM73CEvwMY&w=640&h=360]

Trashed – No Place For Waste with the participation of Jeremy Irons, looks at the risks to the food chain and the environment through pollution of our air, land and sea by waste. The film reveals surprising truths about very immediate and potent dangers to our health. It is a global conversation from Iceland to Indonesia between the film star Jeremy Irons and scientists, politicians and ordinary individuals whose health and livelihoods have been fundamentally affected by waste pollution. Visually and emotionally the film is both horrific and beautiful: an interplay of human interest and political wake-up call. But it ends on a message of hope: showing how the risks to our survival can easily be averted through sustainable approaches that provide far more employment than the current ‘waste industry’.

via TRASHED trailer (2012) – Environmental documentary with Jeremy Irons – YouTube.

Is This Yours? Search Midway Atoll’s Lost & Found For Your Lost Plastic Stuff : TreeHugger

While visiting Midway with the Oceanic Society, there was one past-time everyone enthusiastically participated in: beach combing.

There wasn’t much of a choice. The island is littered with an incredible amount of plastic debris, almost none of which actually originated from the island but rather washed up on shore after floating in the Pacific ocean for who knows how long.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read the entire article via Is This Yours? Search Midway Atoll’s Lost & Found For Your Lost Plastic Stuff : TreeHugger.

BottomFeeder and Garbage Fish

I just finished reading BottomFeeder: How to eat Ethically in a World of Vanishing Seafood by Taras Grescoe.  I fancy myself well informed when it comes to oceanic issues and the health of the world’s oceans (focusing mostly on garbage gyres).  But I was blown away by how much I didn’t know about the state of the world’s fish!  Environmental reporting literature usually sends me into a spiral of species-hatred (my own), depression and finally lingering guilt.  However, Grescoe has accomplished what other reporters have missed, which is to leave me feeling informed and eager to try out my newly uploaded knowledge about seafood.  For example, I will eat more sardines, anchovies, mackerel and smaller mid-level zone fish.  I will never touch another can of tuna, unless the world governments and fishing industry make some serious changes.  That is not to say that BottomFeeder isn’t a powerful book full of stories that will depress you about both fish and people.  But the information is balanced out by the notion that you can immediately address your impact – become a bottom feeder.

To celebrate my newly acquired knowledge, I present to you two artists work of garbage sculptures of fish, which I found on a great site called Recycleart.org

yukari1 Rubbish fish art : Yodogawa Technique

yukari2 Rubbish fish art : Yodogawa Technique

yukari3 Rubbish fish art : Yodogawa Technique

Artists Hideaki Shibata and Kazuya Matsunaga came together in 2003 as Yodogawa Technique to create works from the rubbish and miscellaneous objects found along Osaka’s Yodogawa River. Working with discarded consumer goods and driftwood, the crafty duo made sculptural pieces that are like physical collages and that initially do not even appear as if they are made from garbage.

++ Yukari Art Contemporary