Category Archives: Structure Reuse

Demolition uncovers antique log building in Pennsylvania | WBNS-10TV Columbus, Ohio 

Demolition uncovers antique log building in Pennsylvania

WNEP

“After our demolition contractor started pulling the outsides of the building off, (we) discovered there was a log cabin in there,” said council president Frank Dombroski.

Source: Demolition uncovers antique log building in Pennsylvania | WBNS-10TV Columbus, Ohio | Columbus News, Weather & Sports

Portland Street Artists Turned a Doomed Building Into a Temporary Work of Art – Willamette Week

IMAGE: Mick Hangland-Skill.

New owners Eastbank Development are planning to raze the site and turn it into apartments—but before doing so, they offered it to the nonprofit Portland Street Art Alliance to use as a canvas. Since last spring, more than 50 artists have contributed to the project, covering all four of the building’s outer walls with cows, bears, Sasquatches and hyper-bright 3-D lettering.

Source: Portland Street Artists Turned a Doomed Building Into a Temporary Work of Art – Willamette Week

Equihen Plage: Village Of Upside Down Boat Houses – Unusual Places

Back at the beginning of the 1900s, Equihen Plage was known, as one of the best spots for fishing. As many boats were left to be destroyed on the shore, local fishermen used them as roofs for their handmade shelters. At the time, the area was called Quartier des Quilles en l’Air: the neighborhood of keels in the air.

Source: Equihen Plage: Village Of Upside Down Boat Houses – Unusual Places

Meet the ‘Renovators’: These people are breathing new life into Buffalo’s past – The Buffalo News

PUSH Buffalo Executive Director Rahwa Ghirmatzion, center, with PUSH members and community advocates Luz Velez, left, and Providencia Carrion at the Wash Project. (Derek Gee/Buffalo News)

She now oversees the organization’s programs and operations, which include housing construction, solar installation, job training and a youth center, in addition to advocacy efforts. PUSH employs 40, and has renovated more than 100 homes in the past seven years.

Source: Meet the ‘Renovators’: These people are breathing new life into Buffalo’s past – The Buffalo News

Google, Spruce Goose | ZGF

ZGF partnered with Google to transform the landmark Spruce Goose Hangar in Playa Vista, California. A 450,000+ SF, four-level “building-within-a-building” was developed inside the seven-story, 750-foot-long historic wooden structure. Built by Howard Hughes in 1943 for the construction of the Hercules IV airplane (aka the “Spruce Goose”), the hangar now comprises office, meeting, food service and event spaces, and employee amenity spaces.

Source: Google, Spruce Goose | ZGF

Demolishing rectory in Owen Sound bad for conservation, environment: ACO | Owen Sound Sun Times

The historic St. Mary’s Catholic Church rectory in Owen Sound. The empire-style building was constructed in 1872. A wraparound porch was added in 1917 and was enclosed, as it appears today, in 1965. Denis Langlois

“Not only would we be destroying building materials superior in quality to what we can easily obtain today, we would be burning fossil fuels to transport these wasted materials to the landfill,” Elgie said. “Replacing these building materials extracts a huge toll on our natural environment – the fossil fuels burned, the greenhouse gases emitted, the air and water pollutants generated when new iron ore is mined, new steel smelted, new girders manufactured and transported to warehouses and ultimately Owen Sound – to mention just a few of the greenhouse gas-emitting steps in the construction process.”

Source: Demolishing rectory in Owen Sound bad for conservation, environment: ACO | Owen Sound Sun Times

The case for … never demolishing another building | Cities | The Guardian

Ethical bank Triodos claim their new headquarters is the world’s first totally demountable office building.

Ethical bank Triodos claim their new headquarters is the world’s first totally demountable office building. Photograph: Ossip van Duivenbode

With a structure made entirely from wood, it has been designed with mechanical fixings so that every element can be reused, with all material logged and designed for easy disassembly.

Source: The case for … never demolishing another building | Cities | The Guardian

The most exciting 2020 hotel openings – The Spaces

Courtesy Hotel Can Ferrereta

Found on Mallorca’s south-east coast, this 17th-century building will comprise 32 rooms, a spa with hammam and indoor pool. Can Ferrereta is inspired by the typical Spanish summer house: its light and airy design will champion original wooden beams, a cream palette and stone

Source: The most exciting 2020 hotel openings – The Spaces

The most innovative adaptive reuse projects of 2019 – The Spaces

 

Washington DC’s first public library is now an Apple store

Photography: Nigel Young

Apple took on yet another renovation of a historically significant building in 2019, converting Washington DC’s first public library into a new flagship store. The restoration of the 116-year-old Carnegie Library by Foster + Partners took two years and involved installing a new skylight above a central plaza used for hosting events.

Source: The most innovative adaptive reuse projects of 2019 – The Spaces

A New Idea in Architecture? No New Buildings – Metropolis

For the architecture firm Schaum/Shieh, reuse necessarily means embracing the “background buildings” found throughout American suburbs, like the strip mall. In Houston, Schaum/Shieh retrofitted a midcentury washateria into a series of storefronts, while taking pains to highlight the craftsmanship of the original build. Courtesy Peter Molick

The building sector accounts for about a third of global fuel consumption, but its systematic energetic impact may be still greater. Because we sense the glow and hum of the machines around us, because we are accustomed to paying monthly energy bills and encouraged by the idea that adjusting the thermostat saves money—and, somehow, the planet—we may be more sensitive to running costs than to embodied energy. But, as Moe puts it in that interview, “that’s not really dealing with energy, that’s dealing with the fuel efficiency of a building, which is important, but missing the big picture.”

Source: A New Idea in Architecture? No New Buildings – Metropolis

Balbek Bureau converts a San Francisco church into a startup incubator – Archpaper.com

While the main nave of the church serves as an impromptu auditorium, it’s ambulatory alcoves are fitted out as stationary lounges. (Slava Balbek)

Salvaging and restoring the historic features of the listed Our Lady of Guadalupe church, the firm implemented a scheme that makes good use of its dramatic nave and ambulatory alcoves. While the former plays host to a moveable seating and table system, the latter serves a series of stationary lounges. Together, they set the stage for anything from film-screenings to hackathons.

Source: Balbek Bureau converts a San Francisco church into a startup incubator – Archpaper.com

Century-old glove factory to anchor new, state-of-the-art centre – The Globe and Mail

Matt Bolen of Waterloo-based Edge Architects in front of the century-old Huck Glove factory before construction began.

PETER LEE

“Call it a new generation that doesn’t necessarily place the same value on suburban, shiny new things,” he says, explaining that younger employees want to live and work in communities with a history. “The great thing about these older buildings is they have a story that people can connect to.”

Source: Century-old glove factory to anchor new, state-of-the-art centre – The Globe and Mail

These adaptive reuse hotel suites in Amsterdam are built inside old bridge houses

white hotel structure above water

The project is an ode to the industrial and cultural heritage of Amsterdam and brings to light the importance of water to the area. The suites, spread all throughout the city, are a love letter to Amsterdam architecture, from Amsterdam School to Modernism.

Source: These adaptive reuse hotel suites in Amsterdam are built inside old bridge houses

Uptown office building reborn as midcentury-inspired apartments – Curbed Chicago

A lounge with a tropical theme including palm leaf patterned paper on the ceiling, wicker lamps, brown leather chairs, and game tables.

The tropical game room features shuffle board, bumper pool, and foosball. Images courtesy of Cedar Street

“Mid-century modernism was a no-brainer as the source of inspiration for design,” Fritz tells Curbed. “Tiki lounges and mid-century go hand in hand. There was a sort of obsession with tropical environments in Hollywood movies of the era, and Hawaii became a state at the end of the era, forever enmeshing American and Polynesian culture.”

Source: Uptown office building reborn as midcentury-inspired apartments – Curbed Chicago

Bordeaux’s WWII submarine base will become the world’s biggest digital art centre – The Spaces

Bordeaux’s WWII submarine base will become the world’s biggest digital art centre

Courtesy of Culturespaces

The structure was first operational between 1941 and 1943, used by the Germans to house U-boats. The converted bunker has already hosted temporary shows and concerts, but now four of its sheds will become permanent exhibition spaces.

Source: Bordeaux’s WWII submarine base will become the world’s biggest digital art centre – The Spaces

A South Philly rowhouse reborn through Craigslist, flea markets, estate sales, salvage yards

A South Philly rowhouse reborn through Craigslist, flea markets, estate sales, salvage yards

MONICA HERNDON / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

For example, the staircase combines six different woods from 10 different buildings in what Clark calls “an ode to Frank Furness,” the legendary architect who designed the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. “I kind of puzzled it together,” he says.

Source: A South Philly rowhouse reborn through Craigslist, flea markets, estate sales, salvage yards

Wanted: developer for the old Banks School site in South Eastlake and Roebuck Springs. What happens now? | Bham Now

Transforming the old Banks School would be a huge boon to South Eastlake and Roebuck Springs

Side view of part of the old Banks school. Photo via Jeff E. Newman

In plain English, the City’s looking for just the right developer who can buy the property as is and develop it into something fabulous.

Source: Wanted: developer for the old Banks School site in South Eastlake and Roebuck Springs. What happens now? (PHOTOS) | Bham Now

How a rural Wyoming town is repurposing historic assets to spur local entrepreneurship

Because the vacant buildings anchored Main Street, their rehabilitation would signal that things downtown were changing for the better. And by repurposing the former hotel—once a jewel of the area—they could connect Rawlins’s nascent entrepreneurial ecosystem directly to the community’s history and distinct sense of place.

Source: How a rural Wyoming town is repurposing historic assets to spur local entrepreneurship

Decrepit barn in Quebec was converted into stunning modern design by salvaging old materials

large barn home on green hill

Located in a rural area in Quebec, the old barn was in near ruins until the Montreal-based firm was hired to convert it into a secondary family home. Thankfully, instead of bulldozing the beautiful old building to the ground, the studio managed to salvage nearly every single material to reuse in the new design.

Source: Decrepit barn in Quebec was converted into stunning modern design by salvaging old materials

Upstate NY weekend home stunningly renovated from former ore foundry – Curbed

Exterior of brick house in winter with a gently pitched roof and black stairs and terrace.

Nick Glimenakis

The Clover Hill Foundry is a house with history. Originally built in the late 19th century, the interconnected brick buildings in Somers, New York, were first used as the hub for an ore mining operation. Later in the 1940s, three artists bought the dilapidated buildings, renovating them into standalone homes for their families.

Source: Upstate NY weekend home stunningly renovated from former ore foundry – Curbed

Ruthlessly competitive fuel market creates closed-station blight — and opportunity for reuse

Tara Dugan at her shop, worKS.

BOB WILLIAMS FOR THE INQUIRER
Tara Dugan at her shop, worKS.

Tara Dugan is an exception. In 2016, while searching for a building to open a boutique, she noticed an empty, 70-year-old gas station on a lightly traversed road in Kennett Square, a borough of just over 6,100 people. She saw the potential in an unloved structure, she said, as did three women who repurposed a Sunoco gas station in Malvern to serve gourmet fare.

Source: Ruthlessly competitive fuel market creates closed-station blight — and opportunity for reuse

OP/ED: You never know what you got till it’s gone. – Tillamook County Pioneer

Manzanita celebrates the uniqueness of CARTM and its reuse /recycle leadership and the fact that the City was the first coastal community to ban the use of plastic bags all in the name of environmental stewardship. Reusing building materials and diverting demolition materials from a landfill all contribute to LEED points which are not available for new construction so why did the City decide to not give citizens the opportunity to even have this discussion and prevent approximately 500 dump truck loads of building material from being hauled to the landfill?

Source: OP/ED: You never know what you got till it’s gone. – Tillamook County Pioneer

Chicago Union Station’s iconic power house faces unclear future – Curbed Chicago

A beige brick power plant with twin smoke stacks stands next to a river. Taller skyscrapers stand in the distance.

The Graham, Anderson, Probst and White-designed building occupies a high-profile site along the Chicago River. Getty Images/iStockphoto

“The power house could have a tremendous future if we encourage something creative and clever,” Miller explains. “It takes imagination and a sensitive approach to rethink these kinds of buildings. London’s Tate Modern museum is in a former power house that sat empty for years. The Union Station property isn’t on that same scale, but it’s still an important and rare example of Art Moderne architecture in Chicago.”

Source: Chicago Union Station’s iconic power house faces unclear future – Curbed Chicago

Adaptive Reuse and Restoration of a Historic Building Features 57 Modern Lofts

Adaptive Reuse and Restoration of a Historic Building Features 57 Modern Lofts

The thoughtful restoration and adaptive reuse of the historic structure features 57 oversized, modern lofts market-rate units – boasting more than 280, 8-foot by 10-foot windows to provide each unit with expansive views and an abundance of natural light – of which 39 of the units are affordable.

Adaptive Reuse and Restoration of a Historic Building Features 57 Modern Lofts 11

Source: Adaptive Reuse and Restoration of a Historic Building Features 57 Modern Lofts

Here’s how adaptive reuse has impacted Valley real estate | AZ Big Media

Above: Lincoln Union, built in 1970, is located at 475 E. Lincoln St. in the Phoenix warehouse district and was a former refrigerated distribution center owned by Pearce Beverage Co., which was the first Coors distributor in the Valley.

Adaptive reuse is making a big impact on commercial real estate and likely will for several years to come. According to the Urban Land Institute’s Emerging Trends in Real Estate (2019), the repurposing trend is likely to continue over the next decade. As real estate professionals, we had better be prepared to adapt.

Source: Here’s how adaptive reuse has impacted Valley real estate | AZ Big Media

5 Hottest Office Design Trends of 2019 | Inc.com

COURTESY EXPENSIFY

 “It’s an incredible opportunity for not only historic preservation, but also adaptive reuse,” says Atwood. The Portland, Oregon, office of fintech platform Expensify is housed in the 100-year-old First National Bank. There’s no denying that it’s a 21st-century office, but many of the original design elements remain intact.

Source: 5 Hottest Office Design Trends of 2019 | Inc.com

Rehab/reuse project is warming up for old blanket factory

Stan Bullard
Once the home of a leading national maker of horse blankets, the former National Blanket Building on Cleveland’s West Side could be repurposed as affordably priced apartments for families.

“We’re afraid bricks may fall from it,” he said of the three-story factory dating from 1890 that was expanded until it covers a city block. He’s excited, though, because plans to renovate it to new use are taking shape. “It will mean a lot for the neighborhood in terms of morale because it’s the largest building here and it’s been vacant so long,” León said, “in addition to the economic benefit of it being put back into use.”

Source: Rehab/reuse project is warming up for old blanket factory

A Pathway to Puerto Rico’s Recovery | Business | theweeklyjournal.com

K.C. Conway, economist

K.C. Conway offered the keynote speech at the 15th Anniversary of the Puerto Rico Chapter of the CCIM Institute celebrated in La Concha Hotel in San Juan. >Courtesy CCIM

From the start, Conway pointed out that the OZ and the adaptive reuse of old and unused structures could lead to a much-needed investment push that could help the U.S. territory find its way out of recession.

Source: A Pathway to Puerto Rico’s Recovery | Business | theweeklyjournal.com

See How This Historic Church Got Its Second Life as a Tattoo Shop | Architectural Digest

church turned tattoo parlor interior with giant organ and stained glass windows

 

“What we hadn’t planned on was the opportunity to not only create a dream space, but to participate in preserving a former church that may have otherwise been knocked down to make way for more heinous condo boxes,” says Mike. For the project, he also won the Grand Jury Award for Adaptive Reuse of an existing building by the Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia.

Source: See How This Historic Church Got Its Second Life as a Tattoo Shop | Architectural Digest

How much is your building worth in the circular economy, Mr Foster? | Opinion | Architects Journal

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Material passports specify the position, availability and value of the materials in your buildings. They support the circular economy by making it easier to identify and reuse products, tapping into inherent value rather than squandering it and starting from scratch. Instead of ‘crushing buildings into pretty useless rubble,’ as circular economy expert Duncan Baker-Brown of BBM Sustainable Design explains, material passports make beneficial deconstruction, or even keeping a building, more likely.

Source: How much is your building worth in the circular economy, Mr Foster? | Opinion | Architects Journal

Nina Simone’s childhood home is the focus of new preservation campaign – Curbed

Dilapidated house

National Trust for Historic Preservation

After multiple failed preservation attempts, the house has fallen into disrepair—its paint is chipped and its structure in need of work—but thanks to a new crowdfunding effort, it could be restored to its original state.

Source: Nina Simone’s childhood home is the focus of new preservation campaign – Curbed

An Adaptive Reuse Solution in Today’s Overbuilt Environment – GroundBreak Carolinas

Jami Lloyd, Architectural Designer and A M King Blog Author

Scarcity of land; ample building inventory; reinvention of retail; rising construction costs; labor challenges; new regulations; environmental and schedule benefits; and resource-intensive procurement associated with virgin materials builds a strong case for adaptive reuse.

Source: An Adaptive Reuse Solution in Today’s Overbuilt Environment – GroundBreak Carolinas

Rust and Shine: New retail shopping venue in Williamsport | Business | northcentralpa.com

RustNShine_Outdoorshot_2019.jpg

Now open, Rust and Shine Unique Shopps, 600 Cemetery Street, Williamsport. Carrie Pauling

Rust and Shine is a delightful and surprising collection of vendor shops in 12,000 square feet of space in the former Raytown factory building attached to the Pajama Factory in Williamsport’s west end.

Source: Rust and Shine: New retail shopping venue in Williamsport | Business | northcentralpa.com

Councilman Squilla introduces bills to make it easier to reuse Philadelphia’s historic buildings

Councilman Squilla introduces bills to make it easier to reuse Philadelphia’s historic buildings

MICHAEL PRONZATO / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Though still months away from being heard — or even enacted — Squilla’s bills mark significant progress for Philadelphia, which, despite having the second-most number of buildings constructed before 1945 in the U.S., has struggled to encourage developers to restore old and interesting buildings.

Source: Councilman Squilla introduces bills to make it easier to reuse Philadelphia’s historic buildings

‘The house found us’: A peek inside Chicago churches converted to homes, apartments and condos – Chicago Tribune

Synagogue Flats

Built in 1922, the former Agudas Achim Synagogue in Uptown stopped operating as a religious institution in 2008 — a decade later, it was renovated and turned into chic residential housing units. Synagogue Flats opened in March 2019.- Original Credit: Flats (Flats)

The perks of living in a former religious institution range from the aesthetics to the memorable moments. Currey said she still bumps into people who either went to church at her property as kids or attended weddings there.

Source: ‘The house found us’: A peek inside Chicago churches converted to homes, apartments and condos – Chicago Tribune

The power and possibility of adaptive reuse | Build Design + Construction

Relative to new construction, renovation generally has a higher proportion of labor expense and a lower proportion of material expense. According to the Green Lab report, historic rehabilitation has a 32-year track record of creating two million jobs and generating $90 billion in private investment. These are by no means small numbers, and they reinforce the value of reusing, rather than tearing down, existing buildings.

Source: |

New architect sought for SHS boathouse after recent shift to ‘adaptive reuse’ | Stonington | thewesterlysun.com

Mystic River Boathouse Park 121218

A view of the site of the proposed Mystic River Boathouse Park off of Greenmanville Avenue in Mystic.

O’Neill also noted the new direction for the boathouse would satisfy those who feel the project would benefit from a more historical maritime approach. The site falls within the Rossie Velvet Mill Historic District and contains two buildings classified as “contributing resources” to the historic district.

Source: New architect sought for SHS boathouse after recent shift to ‘adaptive reuse’ | Stonington | thewesterlysun.com