Petaluma’s Sons of Salvage goes against the grain | Petaluma Argus Courier | Petaluma360.com

Aaron Beatrice & Serge Biryukov, Sons of Salvage.

The duo, friends since elementary school in Terra Linda and now in their early thirties, have stumbled upon a crowd pleasing business making unusual and one-of-a-kind wooden furniture for restaurants and other businesses. “We have been artsy and artistic and did different things with our hands. We got into woodworking by necessity,” Beatrice said. “We did not have any money to furnish our apartments so we had to make the furniture. We put photos of the things we made on Instagram and then people started ordering the furniture and we started our business.”

Source: Petaluma’s Sons of Salvage goes against the grain | Petaluma Argus Courier | Petaluma360.com

Citizen Carpentry Community Workshop & Tool Share by Marcis Curtis — Kickstarter

We need your help to finish building out our shop in its new location. We share building space with Refab STL, an amazing non-profit providing skills training to former combat veterans by deconstructing old buildings in and around St. Louis. These materials are then processed and stored for resale in the historic 40,000 square foot building along Route 66, which houses Citizen Carpentry’s new workshop. Citizen Carpentry aims to be the first worker-owned woodworking co-operative of its kind in the Midwest, encouraging community members, artists, and entrepreneurs to utilize our shop for their work. We have the chance to be a hub of creative revitalization, recycling, and skill-sharing in a city sorely lacking in opportunities.

Source: Kickstarter Citizen Carpentry Community Workshop & Tool Share

Interest in Campbell timber is worldwide The Westerly Sun

Henry Castaldi, owner of Westwood Construction and Salvage LLC of Plainfield, uses a hydraulic excavator with a grapple attachment to remove timber deemed unsalvagable from the 99-year-old Campbell Grain Building in Pawcatuck. | Harold Hanka,The Westerly Sun

“This lumber is very unique and we’re working to recover whatever we can,” Castaldi said. “We’ll probably never seem timbers like this in our lifetime. We have loads that are scheduled to go out to our brokers, who then sell it. Some locals have stopped by and made purchases as well.”  Castaldi said a local cemetery plans to buy some chestnut to replace portions of its hearse barn. Although some of it will be sold locally, some of the lumber will most likely be sold overseas to contractors in Spain, Portugal, Italy and France, he said. “Reclaiming wood like this has a big ‘green’ effect because it’s being recycled,” he said. “There are beams here that are 24-feet long and could be more than 400 years old.”

Source: Interest in Campbell timber is worldwide The Westerly Sun

Houston reservoir reborn as public space, canvas for art – Houston Chronicle

In this Friday, Dec. 16, 2016, photo, the exhibition of an abstract-video installation called “Rain” by Venezuelan artist Magdalena Fernández is projected inside a former water reservoir dubbed the “Cistern”.

It’s the latest example of efforts by U.S. cities — including Atlanta; Buffalo, New York; Philadelphia; San Francisco; and Washington, D.C. — to repurpose abandoned and dilapidated pieces of infrastructure as public spaces. Urban planners see the preservation of historic buildings and other structures as essential in creating the kinds of communities people want to live in, said Stephanie Meeks, president and CEO of the Washington, D.C.-based National Trust for Historic Preservation.

Source: Houston reservoir reborn as public space, canvas for art – Houston Chronicle

What’s old is new again | News | suwanneedemocrat.com

Mary Anne & Bubba McCray’s company ReVision recycles, repurposes, and reclaims old wood for new projects and products.

When I asked her how her company, ReVision, got started she said, “We like old stuff.” She started out by making birdhouses and small tables. Mary Anne would take what she made to the master gardener plant sales. In 2015 Bubba started helping her and the business officially started. One of the neatest things about their creations is the material they use. They mainly use the wood from old barns and houses.

Source: What’s old is new again | News | suwanneedemocrat.com

A Modernist Houston Post Office Is Reborn as a Colossal Event Venue

The interior of the Barbara Jordan Post Office in Houston (courtesy Day for Night)

Similar to the Buffalo Bayou cistern, Day for Night will work with its industrial setting that stretches more than 1.5 million square feet. Musicians like Blood Orange, John Carpenter (yes, the film director), and Aphex Twin will take over the surrounding parking lots; inside, among the broad halls and matrix of columns, 14 artists are creating interactive art installations, such as Shoplifter’s hairy “Ghostbeat” sculptures and witchy “Crimson Lotus” light work by Damien Echols. On one floor, “Björk Digital” by the Icelandic singer will fill five rooms with digital and video work, including “Black Lake” which premiered at her recent exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA).

Barbara Jordan Post Office (courtesy Day for Night)

Source: A Modernist Houston Post Office Is Reborn as a Colossal Event Venue

Travis Parkins collaborates in Circular Building project – Builders’ Merchants News

“We supplied the new material and, once the event had come to a close, the house was disassembled and we took all the materials back. This was followed by an examination of the condition, its presentation and value before determining possible reuse or recovery options. Distributors have a crucial role to play in the circular economy and it’s clear that strong collaborative linkages with solid supply chain support are essentials to a circular economy model.”

Source: Travis Parkins collaborates in Circular Building project – Builders’ Merchants News

Pallets on the Town contest hypes recycling and upcycling

Kicking off Pallets on the Town
Kicking off Pallets on the Town, a contest that is all about promoting community spirit, are: from left, Doug Runions, Jason Duguay, Lori Runions, Don Beavis, Janice Bell and Joan Sheppard. Sue Dickens/Metroland

“I am always looking for ways to promote Campbellford and community spirit so it started there . . . and we have a pallet factory here and people are into reduce, reuse, recycle, and upcycle so we thought we could form a festival around pallets . . . so that became Pallets on the Town,” said Joan Sheppard, who is organizing the project and inspiring others to get involved.

Source: Pallets on the Town contest hypes recycling and upcycling

Nonprofit’s founder has 2 missions: Save history, help veterans | Metro | stltoday.com

The nonprofit Refab does sustainable deconstruction

ReFab Founder Eric Scharz. Photo by J.B. Forbes.

Schwarz’s experience had taught him that in an increasingly imitative world, some people hungered for an authenticity conceived in the marriage of age and use.

He founded Refab, a salvage yard in south St. Louis, in a condemned building four years ago. At the time, he had about $3,000 in his pocket and an idea for salvaging discarded building materials and turning around the lives of veterans. Today, Schwarz leases a 40,000-square-foot warehouse off Gravois Avenue and employs 14 people. His budget for 2017 is $1.2 million. That growth is partly attributable to a backlash against the uniformity produced by globalization.

The customers who frequent this two story red-brick repository of rescued material are weary of seeing the same furniture, the same sinks and the same light fixtures — all of it mass-produced on the other side of the planet. “You go into a lot of houses — and I don’t know if we coined the phrase — but they are all ‘Lowes’d up,’” said Randy Miller, who was looking for material for his coffee shop in Southern Illinois. “This is a like a candy store.”

Source: Nonprofit’s founder has 2 missions: Save history, help veterans | Metro | stltoday.com

This Cascade Locks Start-Up Saves Activewear from Landfills | Mount Hood | Portland Monthly

Renewal Workshop HQ: a  stone’s throw from Bridge of the Gods in the beautiful Columbia Gorge. IMAGE: RENEWAL WORKSHOP

So what does the Renewal Workshop sell? Unique, restored activewear diverted from landfills and offered at significantly discounted prices. From its Cascade Locks repair facility, the Workshop intercepts articles of clothing from some of the biggest West Coast names in the outdoor clothing industry (think Prana, Ibex, and Mountain Khakis) that—due to small tears, sewing malfunctions, discolorations, and the like—have been deemed unfit for regular retail and normally would be on their way to landfills.  Instead, the Renewal Workshop founders have worked out a unique arrangement with these companies: rather than trash these items, they’re gifted, and shipped, to Cascade Locks, to be washed and mended back to retail quality.

Source: This Cascade Locks Start-Up Saves Activewear from Landfills | Mount Hood | Portland Monthly

The making of our ‘Whiskmas’ tree – & other whisky barrel gifts! – The Scotch Whisky Experience Blog

The Scotch Whisky Experience Christmas Tree Niall Wilson of Sandwood Designs

200 whisky barrel staves were used in the construction of the tree, created by Niall Wilson of Sandwood Designs. A wood craftsman based near Glasgow, Niall creates stunning whisky barrel furniture, with chairs, tables and an array of other gifts created from repurposed barrel staves. However, our 8ft Christmas tree was one of his biggest challenges yet!

The Scotch Whisky Experience Christmas Tree by Niall Wilson of Sandwood Designs

Source: The making of our ‘Whiskmas’ tree – & other whisky barrel gifts! – The Scotch Whisky Experience Blog

Top 3D-scanning firm selected for Scottsdale renovation project | Scottsdale Independent

Eco3d performs 2D and 3D structural scans on Meetinghouse 3080 in Scottsdale.

Eco3d was able to accurately capture measurements of the church interior, a crucial factor of the building conversion due to the unique shape and construction of many of the rooms, eliminating costly human error and inefficiencies that exist with traditional surveying methods, the release stated. “We are proud to be selected by Structured Real Estate to work on this truly unique, adaptive reuse project. Churches often have some of the most intricate designs so manual surveying can be quite difficult and often leads to backtracking later in the project to fix mistakes,” said Jim Kennelly, Eco3d project manager, in the release. “Our capabilities at Eco3d enable us to eliminate these inefficiencies and provide a more comprehensive measurement of the structure, in less time, allowing developers to use their precious resources in other areas. We are pleased with the results and to once again complete a great project within our home state of Arizona, and look forward to seeing Meetinghouse at 3080 once completed.”

Source: Top 3D-scanning firm selected for Scottsdale renovation project | Scottsdale Independent

Abandoned Mexico City building gets new life as a vibrant mixed-use space – Curbed

Cadaval & Solà-Morales

According to a statement, the architects explained that the project was meant to be an example of “essential architecture,” “highlighting what is indispensable and removing what is not necessary. The project seeks for a harmonic relationship between the new and the old.”

Cadaval & Solà-Morales

Source: Abandoned Mexico City building gets new life as a vibrant mixed-use space – Curbed

Is This the Future of Green Building Materials? – Environmental Leader

Google, Whole Foods and Toms Shoes are among the companies using Ecor — Whole Food has used Ecor for signage, Google used Ecor for wavy interior panels and Toms’ for shoe hangers. The company says it will soon announce a new customer, “a leading global brewer,” that will convert its spent brewers grains, paper and cardboard waste into a range of Ecor materials, which will then be used by the brewer and its vendors to produce their retail graphics, point of purchase displays, commercial packaging and perhaps even the 6 beer bottle boxes.

Source: Is This the Future of Green Building Materials? – Environmental Leader

General Motors, Herman Miller team up on $1M furniture recycling project | MLive.com

GM has partnered with Herman Miller and Green Standards to manage tens of thousands of office surplus furniture and equipment resulting from renovations at Warren Technical Center, Milford Proving Ground, and Global Headquarters. (Courtesy of Herman Miller)

The Toronto-based environmental firm Green Standards, which will clean up the mostly used Herman Miller furniture and donate them to a 100 non-profit organizations. The project is expected to take two years.

“We view waste as just a resource out of place,” said David Tulauskas, GM’s sustainability director, in a statement. “This reuse program enables us to reduce our environmental footprint while making a positive contribution to our community.”

So far, GM has diverted 550 tons of office materials from the landfill through the rePurpose program, equal to growing nearly 46,000 tree seedlings for 10 years or offsetting electricity use from nearly 250 homes for one year.

Source: General Motors, Herman Miller team up on $1M furniture recycling project | MLive.com

How Creative Repurposing of Industrial Scrap Is Holding Off a Neighborhood’s Gentrification by Amanda Abrams — YES! Magazine

Ann Woodward, executive director of the Scrap Exchange, stands before the strip mall and parking lot that the organization now owns.

The Scrap Exchange is on the brink of something much bigger. This summer, the organization closed on a deal to buy 10 acres of a moribund strip mall surrounding the building. Executive director Ann Woodward’s ambition is to turn the area into a “reuse arts district,” unlike any in the country. It will include a range of creative elements, like a playground made of reused materials, a shipping container mall hosting local entrepreneurs, a recycle-a-bike program, artists’ studios, and a performance space.

Source: How Creative Repurposing of Industrial Scrap Is Holding Off a Neighborhood’s Gentrification by Amanda Abrams — YES! Magazine

Repair or Replace: the Army’s Analysis Dispels Age-Old Myths (Wooden Windows)

Link to the Study

The outcome surprised many, as it revealed replacement does not necessarily have an advantage from a cost or environmental perspective. Having accurate data, FBRC proposed a creative solution, which was acceptable to consulting parties. Over the next 10 years, FBRC will repair and replace windows in the historic housing. The resulting mix of refurbished historic windows and new replacements will improve the quality of life for residents on Fort Belvoir while maintaining the historic character of the Fort Belvoir Historic District to the highest degree.

Local audio equipment maker to ship products around the world

Detroit Audio Labs products   COURTESY OF DETROIT AUDIO LABS

Bauer cites two reasons for Detroit Audio Lab’s global appeal. It manufactures and sells premium audio equipment, handmade yet technologically advanced. And then there’s what Bauer calls the “D Factor.” Assembly takes place at a facility on Bellevue Street in Detroit. Reclaimed wood and pipe is purchased from the Architectural Salvage Warehouse of Detroit. The address of the house from where the material was reclaimed is laser engraved on each finished product.

“I thought the buzz would be local, in the state and in the Midwest,” says Bauer. “But people all around the world are interested in the story of Detroit’s renaissance.”

Source: Local audio equipment maker to ship products around the world

From fuel to food: adaptive reuse converts a closed gas station in Princeton, N.J., to a Nomad pizza | Building Design + Construction

The gas station’s original design (above) harkens back to the Modernist movement of the 1930s. Its adaptive reuse as a pizzeria (below) required closing the service bays and garage doors in the rear with a facade of cedar and storefront glazing. Images: Michael Slack, courtesy of JZA+D

Source: From fuel to food: adaptive reuse converts a closed gas station in Princeton, N.J., to a Nomad pizza | Building Design + Construction

1920’s Portland, Oregon House for Sale: 3 beds 1 bath 1,078 sqft SE 119th Ave 

I love the wooded feeling the trees give while still being in an urban setting. The floor plan is functional with 1920’s touches. And the energy upgrade completely turned this from drafty and cold to comfortable and efficient.

Recently renovated, green and energy efficient upgrades. This 1920’s style ranch home in mature David Douglas area. Owner is a General Contractor and Passive House builder & Consultant that remodeled this home from top to bottom and inside to outside. The home features over 1000 square feet of living space, three bedrooms with a functional floor plan. Outside entry area for the unfinished basement that is perfect for storage or a workshop.

 

Source: 3251 SE 119th Ave, Portland, OR 97266 | Zillow

Thrift stores for building materials ride the re-use wave – StarTribune.com

Nick Swaggert, of Better Futures, said the work he and his company do has “saved 700 tons of building materials from going into the landfill.”

With many homes over 30, trend experts expect homeowners to tackle remodeling projects as long as the economy remains strong. Thrift stores such as Habitat ReStores, now at 875 locations nationwide and 15 in Minnesota, are riding the wave too. Sales at the new location, which opened in September, are exceeding expectations. “Our New Brighton store is doing $1 million a year, and we hope the Minneapolis store will match that in two or three years,” said Pete O’Keefe, senior manager of operations at Twin Cities Habitat for Humanity.

Source: Thrift stores for building materials ride the re-use wave – StarTribune.com

Ex-offenders have a new purpose while repurposing Rockford mansion

Bill Howard moves a piece of lumber across the table on Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016, at the Hill House in Rockford. Howard hopes to repurpose all the lumber in the North Main Street mansion through a process known as “historic deconstruction.” KAYLI PLOTNER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER/RRSTAR.COM

Marks and the other men in this house can’t easily find steady work because of their criminal history. They’ve been brought here and hired by Bill Howard, a city-licensed demolition contractor who used to design landfills and now spends his days trying not to fill them up.

 Howard, 72, is an evangelist of “historic deconstruction,” the process of carefully stripping historically salvageable material from buildings and reusing it.

Source: Ex-offenders have a new purpose while repurposing Rockford mansion

Why Portland Requires Deconstruction for its Oldest Homes – CityLab

Rebuilding Center Photo

Dismantling a home carefully enough that its components can be reused is a more intricate process than demolition. It takes longer and requires more labor in place of machinery. At first glance, the labor costs make deconstruction more expensive than demolition. In most cases, though, the tax benefits more than pay for deconstruction—the value of salvaged materials, which can be donated for tax credit or saved for reuse in later projects, is typically thousands of dollars greater than the cost difference between deconstruction and demolition. “When you don’t have to use energy to create a project, you’re just harvesting, it’s almost like free money,” Badiali says. “By simply dismantling something, you’re creating a product. You’re adding value.”

Source: Why Portland Requires Deconstruction for its Oldest Homes – CityLab

Kitchen of the Week: The New Italian Country Kitchen by Katrin Arens, Scrap Wood Edition: Remodelista

Set in an apartment in a newly remodeled early 19th-century house in the center of Bergamo, the kitchen is built largely from salvaged scaffolding wood with a dramatic back wall of iron sheeting that wraps around the range hood.

For 20 years now, Italy-based German interior designer and furniture maker Katrin Arens has been finding fresh uses for discarded wood. She’s still on the vanguard of the reclaimed movement: “I love reusing wood to make things that will last,” she tells us. “I aim for designs that are simple and clean without being cold.”

Source: Kitchen of the Week: The New Italian Country Kitchen by Katrin Arens, Scrap Wood Edition: Remodelista

century-old homes saved from demolitions | KATU

North Portland’s Rebuilding Center – KATU photo

“All of us are pro-urban density, we all understand the concept, but you can’t make these changes this fast and give nothing back to the communities who are there in the first place,” said Seward, “If Portland doesn’t pony up, it may already be too late.” Moretti hopes in the future, the city will consider including homes built in the 20’s and 30’s.

Source: century-old homes saved from demolitions | KATU

Historical Preservation is Essential for Green Building

the-past-and-future-cityAt the same time, roughly one billion square feet of buildings are demolished and replaced every year in the United States. According to an analysis by the Brookings Institution, the country is in the midst of demolishing and replacing 82 billion square feet of existing space — nearly a quarter of the existing building stock — by 2030.

That is an astonishing amount of waste. In fact, the energy used to demolish and rebuild that much space could power the entire state of California for a decade! According to a formula produced for the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, about 80 billion British thermal units (Btus) of energy are embodied in a typical 50,000-square-foot commercial building.

Source: Historical Preservation is Essential for Green Building

EU material efficiency standards could shape future product design

Susanne Baker of techUK says ambitious suite of efficiency standards being developed at EU level as part of Circular Economy legislation can boost eco-design of products.

Ultimately the intention is to extend product lifetimes, facilitate the ability to reuse components or recycle materials at the end of life, and to facilitate the reuse of components and/or recycled materials in products.

Source: EU material efficiency standards could shape future product design

Building northland careers with deconstruction: Social enterprise provides jobs, teaches skills and saves resources | Bemidji Pioneer

Workers take part in a “deconstruction” of an old motel on U.S. Highway 2 in Cass Lake.

Fisher is part of a social enterprise called Miigwech Aki, or “Thank you, Earth” led by Christopher Bedeau. The goal is to provide jobs and training in northern Minnesota, partnering with tribes and the local communities, while honoring Mother Earth by diverting resources from landfills.

Source: Building northland careers with deconstruction: Social enterprise provides jobs, teaches skills and saves resources | Bemidji Pioneer

Green Building Materials Market Worth Will Reach USD 255 Billion in 2020 | AAN

North America and Europe are witnessing robust growth of green buildings market owing to stringent environmental concern, growing awareness about environmental sustainability and national, state & municipal mandates and policies has been in the region. This in turn resulted into huge demand for green building materials in these regions. North America was the largest regional market for green building materials market in 2014. North America accounted for over 40% share in total green building materials volume consumed in 2014.

Source: Green Building Materials Market Worth Will Reach USD 255 Billion in 2020 | AAN

The art of deconstruction | Local News | heraldandnews.com

Reba VanAcker and her son Christopher Green. By Gerry O’Brien H&N Editor

 

When Green put the word out on the Internet that DoubleHead had well-preserved timber from the 1930s to the 1960s, a group of Japanese buyers jumped on it. “They flew out here and were overwhelmed at what we had,” Green said. As it turns out, Japanese love all things from the West. The Japanese reproduce vintage-style door handles, lamps, clothing, etc. They use our lumber for flooring, wall coverings, doors and furniture.” “It was like watching kids in a candy store. They were literally running from place to place. We sold them four container loads of flooring,” Green said, mainly two- by 12-foot slats.

Source: The art of deconstruction | Local News | heraldandnews.com

A world without waste: the rise of urban mining | Guardian Sustainable Business | The Guardian

The UK Green Building Council significantly cut landfill waste by refurbishing its head office with 98% of the original fixtures reused or repurposed. Photograph: UKGBC

Such measures could bring about a similar shift in mentality within the industry as has been witnessed in relation to health and safety, he argues: “Time is a real pressure when it comes to taking materials down to reuse them, but it’s interesting that time is never an issue for health and safety these days.”

Source: A world without waste: the rise of urban mining | Guardian Sustainable Business | The Guardian

Penn calculates financial toll of blight, violence in Philadelphia | PhillyVoice

Before and after photos of a blighted property in Philadelphia. SOURCE/PENN URBAN HEALTH LAB

Based on these figures and the initial cost of remediation, the first-year return on investment to taxpayers for firearm assaults averted was $5 per abandoned building and $26 per vacant lot. The societal first-year returns on investment for firearm assaults averted were $79 for the remediation of an abandoned building and $333 for the greening of a vacant lot.“The immeasurable pain and void left when lives are lost to firearm violence sends a ripple effect through families and neighborhoods,” said Branas, director of the Penn Urban Health Lab. “This study demonstrates sustainable, replicable strategies that successfully reduce firearm violence. They can transform communities across the country, save lives, and provide well more than a full return on investment to taxpayers and their communities.”

Source: Penn calculates financial toll of blight, violence in Philadelphia | PhillyVoice

Growing Hops in Abandoned Lots? Pittsburgh Will Drink to That | Innovation | Smithsonian

Hops successfully grow up the retaining wall on a lot in the Stanton Heights neighborhood of Pittsburgh. The black circles at the base of the plants are old plastic drum barrels that were cut into rings and filled with mulch from a nearby community compost. This helps to keep the hops moist. (Pete Bell)

After all, many of the growing number of craft breweries in Pittsburgh source their hops from non-local suppliers, like those in Oregon and Washington. Plus, hops seemed relatively easier: You can avoid the pest problems you face with other urban crops, since hops are so bitter. They also grow vertically, so they need little space on the ground. “I came up with an idea to grow brewing crops … to be used locally in a beer to be able to create a truly local beer,” Bell says.

Source: Growing Hops in Abandoned Lots? Pittsburgh Will Drink to That | Innovation | Smithsonian

Deconstructing Portland – Curbed

Portland gains a lot by deconstructing rather than demolishing. It gains jobs—deconstruction employs, on average, six people to every one that demolition requires. It gains quality materials—the tight grain of old growth timber in older homes is strong enough to fold a nail. It gains a healthier planet when we divert waste from landfills—according to the city, about 20 percent of landfill waste comes from construction and demolition. It also avoids the toxins from lead and asbestos that are released into the air when homes are demolished.

Source: Deconstructing Portland – Curbed

Rare glass negatives found in condemned Peoria home


PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRIS TRAUGOTT COULTER An image of the aftermath of the fire at the German Fire Insurance Company, 115 N. Jefferson, which was destroyed on February, 28, 1915. The image is one of many found in the attic of 807 Spring Street.

The negatives, along with doors, door hardware, stair parts, and a fireplace mantel were hauled back to the Whiskey City Architectural Salvage shop where they were priced and put on display.

Soon after Chris Traugott Coulter visited the shop. He was very excited when he saw the negatives. “I was ecstatic,” he said recently while sitting at his computer in the Peoria Historical Society’s offices. “You don’t normally find that many glass plates. You usually find only two or three.”

Source: Rare glass negatives found in condemned Peoria home

Branningham Grove coming down | Owen Sound Sun Times

Adam Watson of Roy-Mar Demolition uses an excavator to remove part of the Branningha Grove property on Owen Sound's east side on Monday. The demolition of the property is expected to last until the end of next week. (Rob Gowan The Sun Times)

Adam Watson of Roy-Mar Demolition uses an excavator to remove part of the Branningha Grove property on Owen Sound’s east side on Monday. The demolition of the property is expected to last until the end of next week. (Rob Gowan The Sun Times)

The move to demolish the building has been a contentious one at times with some in the community calling on the building to be saved and designated under the Ontario Heritage Act due to historical and cultural significance. Built in 1881 by Walter and Mary Holmes, the High Victorian-style home was modelled after the original owners’ house in England.

Source: Branningham Grove coming down | Owen Sound Sun Times

Sound investment: CEO turns reclaimed wood into original guitars

Mark Wallace, owner of Wallace Detroit Guitars, makes his instruments from reclaimed wood salvaged from Detroit buildings. Musician Stewart Francke vouches for their quality.

“It’s a beautiful guitar. It makes you feel good to hold it. It makes you feel good to play it,” says Francke, 58, who’s recorded with Bruce Springsteen, toured with Bob Seger and opened with the guitar for Joan Jett at this year’s Arts, Beats and Eats festival. “I’ve got 25 guitars, but this one is the one that I play the most live, and it sounds probably the cleanest.”

Source: Sound investment: CEO turns reclaimed wood into original guitars