The hottest new condo trend is reusing old buildings | New York Post

A model interior at Six Cortlandt Alley — a five-unit condo developed by Ryan Kaplan that’s set within a former factory. Halstead Property Development Marketing

“We actually have several locations within the building where you can see the original fabric of the property,” says Ryan Kaplan, a partner at Imperial. “We wanted to remind people from the moment they step into the building and up until they get to their apartment that there is a history here that can’t be replicated in a new building.”

Source: The hottest new condo trend is reusing old buildings | New York Post

New city law requires deconstruction rather than demolition – OnMilwaukee

Demolition dumps materials into landfills, boosts carbon emissions and releases asbestos and other harmful matter into the air, says Ald. Bob Bauman.

The Common Council approved the new deconstruction ordinance – which was co-sponsored by Alds. Nik Kovac and Khalif Rainey – Tuesday, and the rule that goes into effect on Jan. 1, 2018, requires deconstruction rather than demolition of most one- to four-family buildings built before 1930 that are scheduled to be razed.

Source: New city law requires deconstruction rather than demolition – OnMilwaukee

Sustainable business park planned in shadow of Kent County landfill | MLive.com

Officials showed off the site just south of the landfill on Wednesday, Nov. 8, voicing their hope it will soon be transformed into a new “sustainable business park.” They hope the site could attract companies specializing in reclaiming or converting waste materials that would otherwise be dumped into the landfill, ideally expanding West Michigan’s footprint in green industry while simultaneously reducing the rate at which the area’s landfills grow.

Source: Sustainable business park planned in shadow of Kent County landfill | MLive.com

For $525K, Cabbagetown loft is old, vast, borderline gothic – Curbed Atlanta

Keller Williams Realty Cityside

A pioneering adaptive-reuse property, the 500-unit landmark building was originally a 19th Century cotton mill. Transformed into lofts in the 1990s, it withstood a wicked fire in 1999 and a tornado nine years ago.

Source: For $525K, Cabbagetown loft is old, vast, borderline gothic – Curbed Atlanta

Pamplin Media Group – Luscious carpentry

LUSH – All the furnishings inside the Lush stores — at least the ones that have been remodeled so far — are made in-house from sustainably reclaimed lumber. People test bath bombs in the porcelain sink.

“We were doing some of our bigger shops in the reclaimed wood,” Moreira said. “We did a full switchover in 2014, so everything now is made with the reclaimed lumber.”Since Pioneer Millworks is based in Oregon and in New York, they source wood from all over the U.S. from old grain silos, barns and corral boards for cattle.

Source: Pamplin Media Group – Luscious carpentry

Deconstruction Of Webber Building Downtown Almost Complete – Alabama News

“A long slow goodbye”…that’s how Lois Cortell, Senior Development Manager for the city, described the deconstruction of the Webber Building, also known as the Old Montgomery Theatre downtown.The deconstruction process has been ongoing for about a year now. Cortell says it’s not to be confused with demolition.”One of the conditions of the sale was to maximize the salvage of the materials and to do that really involved a slow deconstruction” she explained.

Source: Deconstruction Of Webber Building Downtown Almost Complete – Alabama News

Salvage City to host building material pop-up market Saturday | Northwest Indiana Business Headlines | nwitimes.com

Steel City Salvage

“People probably have never seen anything like this,” Pytel said. “The real reason to come out is some of the beauty inside Gary’s structures that they may have passed over. There are endless possibilities with all the items that have been reclaimed.” Anyone who’s interested in more information should visit www.delta-institute.org or call Pytel at 312-554-0900.

Source: Salvage City to host building material pop-up market Saturday | Northwest Indiana Business Headlines | nwitimes.com

Owen ‘investing in the future by repurposing the past’ | Herald Citizen

John Owen talks about his passion for architectural salvage in his new shop, Dry Levee Architectural Salvage.
TY KERNEA | HERALD-CITIZEN

A lot of the items he’s salvaged have been leased for props in weddings. “That’s a trend that’s starting to really take off,” he said. Several school teachers also approached him asking about historic elements he has found. “It’s a hands-on tool for those kids,” he said. One of the first projects was the deconstruction of a log cabin that housed 10 children in the early 1900s. “It was a small cabin,” he said. “When we took it down, the grandson of one of those kids found me and asked what I did with it. He wanted us to rebuild it for him. So that’s what we did.”

Source: Owen ‘investing in the future by repurposing the past’ | Herald Citizen

Rusting 1950s cargo ship transformed into a stunning modern floating home | Inhabitat 

Unlike most ship and barge conversions, this transformation eliminated the linear system of spaces and offers several sight lines that run the entire length of the ship and across different floors.

Source: Rusting 1950s cargo ship transformed into a stunning modern floating home | Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

What’s old is new again for former Studebaker factory | WSBT

The wood comes from building 84 of the Studebaker factory. It’s now being reclaimed in building 112, being turned into workbenches, keychains, and even pens. “When I look at it, I can see history. I can literally in a way feel how many feet, how many cars were built on this,” said Woodsmith Owner, Kevin Smith.

Source: What’s old is new again for former Studebaker factory | WSBT

A Dylan Thomas snug has been rebuilt in a London pub – close to where the poet romanced his mistress – Wales Online

The bar at the exhibition at Swansea Museum, with creator Rhys Stephens, Glenda Thomas and Jeff Towns.

Author and Dylan Thomas expert Jeff Towns, who wrote book A Pearl of Great Price detailing the year-long fling, said: “It is great to see this bar lives on. It was really well put together and was a huge success in the museum. “It is fantastic too that it has found a home in an area with a connection with Dylan; he and Pearl enjoyed a river cruise along this part of The Thames, so it is perfect piece of synchronicity.

Source: A Dylan Thomas snug has been rebuilt in a London pub – close to where the poet romanced his mistress – Wales Online

12 high-design wineries across the U.S. – Curbed

The Saffron Fields Vineyard in Oregon. Courtesy of Saffron Fields Vineyard

Designed by architect Richard Shugar of 2Form Architecture, this tasting room in Oregon was completed in 2013. Originally on the site of a dairy farm, the winery’s new building uses reclaimed materials from the old barn and sits on a hill with panoramic views. A small patio cantilevers over a pond that laps against the south side of the building, and guests can enjoy wine on the expansive patio. Sloping roof planes extend from the building and also allow rainwater runoff to be collected for irrigation and to fill up the adjacent pond.

Source: 12 high-design wineries across the U.S. – Curbed

The Tombstone House was built with 2200 discarded gravestones / Boing Boing

However, during the Great Depression, maintaining the cemetery and the headstones suffered because of scant funding. The city decided to cut the tombstones in half and lay the top halves, which were engraved with the soldiers’ details, on the ground so they no longer stood erect. These makeshift flat graves saved money on mowing and maintenance costs. The bottom halves of 2,200 slain tombstones were then sold for the princely sum of $45. Their new owner, Oswald Young, used them to build his house, chimney, and walkway…

Source: The Tombstone House was built with 2200 discarded gravestones / Boing Boing

Tiny Texas Houses from Salvaged Materials – Green Homes – MOTHER EARTH NEWS

These recycled buildings, offered for sale out of Luling, Texas (between San Antonio and Houston), are built of recycled materials, based on traditional designs. They have instant soul. This is a wonderful body of work by builder Brad Kittel.

Our buildings are 99 percent pure salvage. Everything — doors, floors, windows, lumber, porch posts, glass, door hardware, and even the siding — has been saved and re-used to create houses that we hope will last for a century or more.

Source: Tiny Texas Houses from Salvaged Materials – Green Homes – MOTHER EARTH NEWS

Legacy Architectural Salvage hires assistant manager | WilmingtonBiz

Helms is passionate about promoting Legacy Architectural Salvage (LAS) as Wilmington’s source for reclaimed wood, doors, windows and other architectural salvage to use in the renovation and repair of older homes, according to a press release. She believes in the role of architectural salvage in environmental sustainability through the reuse and repurposing of historic salvage.

Source: Legacy Architectural Salvage hires assistant manager | WilmingtonBiz

DEQ Announces First Reuse and Repair Workforce Development Micro-Grant Recipients Totaling $48,596

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality has selected recipients for five micro grant projects aimed at workforce development in the reuse and repair industries. Each grantee is receiving up to $10,000 that can be used to purchase equipment and train employees to support long-term business expansion.

Source: Oregon.gov: NewsDetail

Lawsuit says nonprofit Second Chance misled consumers – Baltimore Sun

“Second Chance and the appraisal company had a mountain of information about the IRS’ hostile view of the benefits that the defendants were promoting,” said Ugo Colella, a partner with Duane Morris, the law firm representing the plaintiffs. “The representations they were making were at best incomplete, and at worst, they were hiding this information to ensure the donors keep coming. Either way, the defendants withheld critical information from Maryland consumers.”

Source: Lawsuit says nonprofit Second Chance misled consumers – Baltimore Sun

Pamplin Media Group – NE Portland demolition dust-up highlights fears over lead paint

COURTESY PHOTO: PORTLAND CHRONICLE – Builder Peter Kusyk began demolition of a Northeast Portland church in April. Kusyk’s Firenze Development has faced off with neighbors of a Northeast Porltand bungalow because of concerns about lead in the demolition dust.

The problem was, as neighbors were to learn, the letter referred to lead levels in water running off a landfill. It had nothing to do with lead dust flying from a demolition.

Source: Pamplin Media Group – NE Portland demolition dust-up highlights fears over lead paint

A peek inside: Renovation work beginning soon on five 19th-century homes – Insider Louisville

1207 E. Broadway is one of five homes being renovated and sold as affordable houses. | Photo by Caitlin Bowling

All five homes were constructed sometime in the 1890s and are being preserved. Meanwhile, a 260-unit, multimillion-dollar apartment building is under construction in the same block. “We are seeing an entire neighborhood recreated,” said Christy Lee Brown, a local philanthropist who has helped promote historic renovation in Louisville by funding half of a historic preservation revolving loan fund.

Source: A peek inside: Renovation work beginning soon on five 19th-century homes – Insider Louisville

Urban Mining Briefing Reveals Huge Global Potential – Lexology

The briefing emphasizes that urban mining is more than just enhanced municipal waste management, but that it has the potential to put the entire stock of long-lived goods — including consumer products, buildings, and landfills — into service, and can provide long-term strategies for sophisticated material flow management.

Source: Urban Mining Briefing Reveals Huge Global Potential – Lexology

Duane Morris LLP Announces: Consumers File Class Action Against Baltimore Nonprofit Second Chance, Inc. and Virginia-Based Appraisal Company NoVaStar Appraisals, Inc. | Business Wire

The problem, the lawsuit contends, is that Second Chance and NoVaStar have known for many years that (1) the IRS audited consumers and did not allow tax refunds or deductions for house donations made to Second Chance, and (2) that NoVaStar’s appraisals were IRS non-compliant. According to the complaint, despite this knowledge, Second Chance and NoVaStar concealed that information from Maryland consumers, including Gogtay and Dixit.

Source: Duane Morris LLP Announces: Consumers File Class Action Against Baltimore Nonprofit Second Chance, Inc. and Virginia-Based Appraisal Company NoVaStar Appraisals, Inc. | Business Wire

Mike Hendry saves old pianos from being disposed and destroyed by turning them into furniture, ornaments and jewellery | Leader

A dining table made from an old piano.

“Weighing in at between 250-500kg, they have become a significant contributor to landfill, so we have proposed reinventing and repurposing them into modern and classical furniture pieces,” he said.Mr Hendry said he believed Pianos Recycled had stopped almost 20 tonnes worth of pianos going to landfill in the past year.

Source: Mike Hendry saves old pianos from being disposed and destroyed by turning them into furniture, ornaments and jewellery | Leader

Cities Need To Transition To Circular Economies: Google Wants To Help – The future of business

Another tool, called Portico, tracks the health of materials used in buildings. Google has used it internally in about 200 of its own buildings. “If you envision this world in which you’re endlessly cycling materials back into the system, it’s really critical that you know what’s in them, and that you know there’s nothing harmful,” says Brandt. Digital tools can also be used to create online marketplaces for reused building materials.

Source: Cities Need To Transition To Circular Economies: Google Wants To Help – The future of business

Can Bauman and Kovac Create Jobs? » Urban Milwaukee

City owned home at 2817-19 North 22nd Street. Photo from the City of Milwaukee.

The ordinance will kick in whenever the city is set to demolish a structure or a private contractor seeks a permit to demolish. And there are exceptions to the mandate to deconstruct if there are safety considerations or the salvageable materials have been damaged by something like a fire. While Bauman and Kovac are both historic preservation hawks in Milwaukee, because demolition and deconstruction jobs employ individuals from underserved communities in the city Bauman said “I do see this primarily as a job creation tool.”

Source: Can Bauman and Kovac Create Jobs? » Urban Milwaukee

Decon and Reuse Expo ’17: Portland’s landmark deconstruction ordinance takes center stage | KATU

“If we can save that amount of space in the landfills, that means that we’re not generating emissions from the decaying of those materials,” said expo organizer and re-use consultant, Sara Badiali. “The environmental impact is astounding.”

Source: Decon and Reuse Expo ’17: Portland’s landmark deconstruction ordinance takes center stage | KATU

Nothing In Nature Is Wasted: Reclaimed Wood | WXPR

Two national examples of this trend toward reclaimed wood are the Building Materials Reuse Association, which is a nonprofit educational organization with a mission to facilitate the salvage and reuse of building materials, and more locally, the Habitat for Humanity ReStores, which are retail outlets where used and surplus building materials are sold. Approximately 30% of sales are wood-based materials. Nationally, more than 55 million tons of wood waste is generated on an annual basis. About half of this material is of acceptable size, quality, and condition to be considered available for recovery. Clearly, the amount of waste wood available for recovery in the U.S. is a substantial figure.

Source: Nothing In Nature Is Wasted: Reclaimed Wood | WXPR

Arkansas architecture students make plans to redesign historic stagecoach stop

PHOTO BY DAVID GOTTSCHALK
Lauren Lambert and Katie Murphy, graduate students at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, review architectural documents Friday in front of the horse barn at Fitzgerald Station in Springdale. Students from the university will come up with plans for the site, which once was a stagecoach stop on the Butterfield Overland Express mail route.

McClure, a native of Pryor, Okla., is an architecture professor and associate dean of the College of the Arts at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He said the Fitzgerald Station fits perfectly with the design studio’s goals for adaptive reuse of historic properties.Smith said the students will come back to Arkansas to present their designs to stakeholders in December.Just having the designs could be helpful for getting grants, McClure said.

Source: Arkansas architecture students make plans to redesign historic stagecoach stop

Daily Inter Lake , Landmark building to be repurposed

A worker dismantles the roof of the Kalispell Lumber building on Thursday. (Aaric Bryan/Daily Inter Lake)

The 22,000-square-foot structure built in 1939 will be dismantled over the next 12 weeks and reassembled at another location in Kalispell. The Kalispell Lumber Co. is an historic local business, opening a mill on Fourth Avenue East north of the railroad tracks in 1904. The mill and lumber company later moved to its west-side location, and employed between 50 and 60 workers until the manufacturing facility closed in 1963. In 1979, Brad Wright purchased the facility and continued to operate the retail building-materials business for more than 30 years. Once he closed the doors to Wright’s Kalispell Lumber, Wright sought out opportunities for preserving the historic structure.

Source: Daily Inter Lake , Landmark building to be repurposed

Out of the woods | National Post

This table used to be part of a barn. HD Threshing

Lots of companies do reclaimed, she notes. “Some are putting barn board on walls, or buying items made from shipping palettes. It’s great that this stuff is not going to landfill. Reclaimed is gaining momentum, especially with younger people.”Yet some claims about reclaimed are not all they’re cracked up to be, so buyers need to know what they’re looking for. In fact some pieces are not reclaimed wood at all, but only mass-produced wood made to look the part.

Source: Out of the woods | National Post

Meet the barrier-breaking woman behind a massive house of salvaged treasures – The Washington Post

Nancy Meyer finds boxes of expensive Italian tile on a shelf at Community Forklift. (Katherine Frey/The Washington Post)

Meyer’s part-time job eventually became a full-time mission to get the nonprofit off the ground. She negotiated with the landlord for a lower rent, cleaned up the store, created guidelines to standardize prices and designed internal structures that would make operations more efficient. Because Community Forklift couldn’t afford advertising, she launched a grass-roots marketing campaign to educate the community about environmental issues and promote the nonprofit. Community Forklift still hosts educational programs, including monthly arts festivals and DIY reuse workshops.

Source: Meet the barrier-breaking woman behind a massive house of salvaged treasures – The Washington Post

Company offers lesson in architectural salvage

The eight to 10 participants then we will go to a “cracker shack” and pull it apart, with hands-on training and oversight “because most of salvage is understanding the ‘feel’ of the wood and how to remove items based on pressure points, leverage, and listening to the cues that the wood gives you.”This $100 per person course — $75 for a second person from the same family or organization — will be fun but hard work. There are risks involved with deconstruction and anyone entering the jobsite must acknowledge and sign a waiver, the company said.

Source: Company offers lesson in architectural salvage

Oregon Coast-Inspired Home by Aspect Design Build – Midwest Home Magazine

The living room features a two-sided fireplace, reclaimed and painted mantel, and ceiling medallion.

A deliberate walkabout in the home reveals additional architectural salvage that is artfully repurposed. The stair railing in the front foyer, for example, is bookended by reclaimed iron posts. “We could only get three, so we cut the additional wood posts in the same shape,” says Winkler. The fireplace mantel in the great room, also reclaimed and then painted to match the built-in cabinetry and millwork, still shows off its dentil molding and fluted columns with the kind of wood joinery used at the turn of the century.

Source: Oregon Coast-Inspired Home by Aspect Design Build – Midwest Home Magazine

Community Forklift wins small business award from eBay, thanks to its mission and its fans | Hyattsville Life & Times

Community Forklift and its CEO Nancy J. Meyer won a SHINE Award from eBay in the Charitable Business category. Photo courtesy of Community Forklift

Community Forklift is a nonprofit reuse center for building materials, architectural salvage and antiques. The name refers to the organization’s mission “to lift up communities” in the DC area by turning the region’s construction waste stream into a resource stream. “These prizes will help us reach a larger online audience, which means we can do more good here in the DC region!” Meyer wrote on a blog post. “We can keep more materials out of landfills, provide more free materials to neighbors in need, and offer more green jobs to local residents.”

Source: Community Forklift wins small business award from eBay, thanks to its mission and its fans | Hyattsville Life & Times

From Seaport shipwreck to fancy furniture: Charlestown woodworker repurposes scraps – The Boston Globe

J. DICKEY Conference table made from the boards of Seaport shipwreck.

On Aug. 11, Dickey will display furniture he made using wood from the historic ship during an event at District Hall, a Seaport venue on Northern Avenue not far from where the vessel’s remains were uncovered. He’ll also share with the public pieces of the ship that weren’t transformed into furniture, offering history buffs and boat enthusiasts a chance to get up close and inspect the leftovers. “All the pieces of the ship will be represented,” he said. “Any person with knowledge in ship-building and sailing will get to see how they originally put this ship together.”

Source: From Seaport shipwreck to fancy furniture: Charlestown woodworker repurposes scraps – The Boston Globe

Buildin’ Manhattan on Vimeo

Buildin' Manhattan from Gideon Camera Crew | Cowboyfilm on Vimeo.

Months and months of long working days… over 6000 pieces sawn to perfection. BUILDIN’ MANHATTAN Dutch artist Diederick Kraaijeveld created a 10 feet long Manhattan in wood, special wood: red cedar from Manhattan water towers. Shipped in a sea freight container from New York City to The Netherlands. One day the piece will be back in New York.

Master of Special Problem Solving, Dave Bennink Disassembles 1,000 Buildings by Hand – Sara Badiali

 

Master of Special Problem Solving, Dave Bennink Disassembles 1,000 Buildings by Hand  

by Sara Badiali

Imagine you are packing your car for a trip. You can only move your gear once, but you still have to maximize space.  Sound difficult?  Now imagine you have to do it with a stranger’s gear.  That’s what Dave Bennink of Re-Use Consulting has been doing almost every week for the past 25 years.

But instead of gear, he does it with entire dismantled buildings.  Dave’s expertise is in disassembling structures, staging the components for transport, and then moving them to be resold.

Dave deconstructs buildings for reuse. He’s dismantled 1,000 structures, in 42 states and 4 providences. He is a master of spatial problem solving. The materials are so big and take up so much space on site that they can only be moved once.

Dave Bennink’s extensive knowledge and experience meant that when the City of Portland passed their new Deconstruction Ordinance, they asked Dave to train the City’s first Certified Deconstruction Contractors. They also tapped him to train and certify a new deconstruction workforce.

In addition to his own business dismantling structures, Dave is a certified Deconstruction Trainer for the Building Material Reuse Association. He’s done trainings for the City of Seattle, Vancouver, other municipalities, numerous small businesses and organizations.

 

Students are drilled in safety, technique, material recovery, recycling, diversion equations, staging and selling materials. All of the lessons take place in the actual building the students are deconstructing.

It is a common site to see Dave drawing out waste diversion calculations on the interior walls one day, and the next day the walls are gone.  If you ever buy reclaimed materials with calculations on them, you may have just purchased a piece of one of Dave’s many classrooms.

Along with his own business, and deconstruction training, Dave also is a consultant for reclaimed building material reuse start-ups. Guiding entrepreneurs with reuse business planning, deconstruction jobs, and marketing used building materials is Dave’s passion.

He is happy to help new converts into the world of environmental stewardship, job creation, community building, and healthy alternatives to demolition. His motto is “Say no to the track hoe”.

 

 

If you are interested in meeting Dave Bennink you can see him present twice at the Decon + Reuse ’17 Expo: Saving Our Past, Building the Future conference in Portland, Oregon on September 24th-27th. Dave will be on a panel with some of his certified deconstruction students. He will also be speaking on the basic principles of starting a reuse business (including spatial acumen).

Dave will be presenting at the Decon + Reuse ’17 Expo with over 50 other building material reuse experts, and hundreds of participants. This is the largest building material reuse event in the country and is being hosted by the City of Portland, Metro, the Reclamation Administration, and Portland State University’s Institute for Sustainable Solutions.

 

Dave Bennink owns and operates Re-Use Consulting, which you can find it at ReuseConsulting.com.  Or contact him at re-use@comcast.net or (360) 201-6977.

Decon + Reuse ’17 Awards Nomination Form

Decon + Reuse ’17 Awards Nomination Form The work of developing the reuse, salvage and deconstruction industries is done everyday by dedicated individuals. At each conference we take a night to honor those people whose daily work has an outsize impact and benefits us all.

If you know a person or organization deserving of recognition for such activities, please nominate them here!

Awards this year will be recognized for folks who are working at the local level as well as those whose impact has been felt nationally. The BMRA reserves the right to make multiple awards in a category, transfer a nomination to another category, or not to designate any award in a category.

Source: Decon + Reuse ’17 Awards Nomination Form

Home-made Hendrix guitar lands in Sandspit – Haida Gwaii Observer

Topped by recycled fir baseboards from Jimi Hendrix’ childhood home, this guitar made by luthier Reuben Forsland also has nails and wiring from the home inlaid in all of its fret markers. The “story” guitar is a collaboration between Forsland and Kevin Hennig of Symphontree Music in Sandspit. (Kevin Hennig/Symphontree Music)

Handmade by Reuben Forsland, a Métis luthier in Comox, its soundboard is made from the fir baseboards of Hendrix’ bedroom. Inside the silver fret markers are wires and nails from the home. For the rosette, the decorative trim around the soundhole, Forsland inlaid bits of paint from the Hendrix home floor, encased in 150 pieces of ebony. “That’s what this guy does, all the time,” says Kevin Hennig, owner of SymphonTree Music, a specialized guitar shop based in Sandspit.

Source: Home-made Hendrix guitar lands in Sandspit – Haida Gwaii Observer

Something old, something new. (Re)using salvaged building materials | Metro

Mary Reese hunts for tile at the new Habitat for Humanity ReStore in Gresham.

Jacobson compares shopping for salvaged building materials to thrift or vintage shopping, and advises shopping early and often. “Stock changes from day to day and quantities can be limited,” he says. “The list of stores is growing and that makes it easier to find what you need, but the region’s supply chain for used building materials is still a work in progress” Also, he says, find a contractor willing to work with you, one who’s willing to deconstruct and salvage materials, as well as incorporate reused items into the new space.

Source: Something old, something new. (Re)using salvaged building materials | Metro

SoDo’s Recology CleanScapes Program Gives Seattle Artists Mountain of Trash

Image Credit:
Hayley Young
Recology CleanScapes Artists in Residence Max Cleary and Meg Hartwig exercises her “scavenging privileges” at SoDo recycling facility.

“What’s interesting about recycled materials is that when it comes down to it, they’re all just things caught in a cycle of being acquired and passed on,” Cleary observed in April, early in his residency. “The materials I find within Recology’s recycling stream have the potential to contain richer, more unexpected backgrounds and be in unpredictable states, which is exciting to me.”

Source: SoDo’s Recology CleanScapes Program Gives Seattle Artists Mountain of Trash

Going green: What’s in it for sports venue owners? | Construction Dive

The Barclays Center opted for a variety of green features. Credit: Adam E. Moreira

Arena designers also repurposed construction materials from the structures that were demolished to make way for the Kings’ new home, resulting in more than one-third of the new building’s material recycled from the old ones. Designers even used recycled athletic shoes for the court surfaces.

Source: Going green: What’s in it for sports venue owners? | Construction Dive

Deconstruction hailed as answer for ailing cities

Details, an organization in Baltimore, is one of dozens of similar groups around the country helping to remake cities through deconstruction. USA TODAY

Advocates hail deconstruction as a win-win that is more economical and environmentally friendly than demolition. They say it creates needed jobs and can help depressed cities turn things around.  “The systematic deconstruction and dismantling of buildings has a profound role in transforming communities,” said Anne Nicklin, executive director of the Building Materials Reuse Association, based in Chicago. Deconstruction seems to be on the rise, Nicklin said, citing programs not only in Baltimore, but also in Chicago, Detroit, Portland, Buffalo, Cleveland and other places.

Source: Deconstruction hailed as answer for ailing cities

BMRA News, July 2017

PDX RUST: A Community Reuse Forum Alongside DECON + REUSE ’17 Coming out of the recent passage of the deconstruction ordinance in Portland, Oregon as well as the event of DECON + REUSE ’17 coming to the city, Sara Badiali of Reclamation Administration and Barbara Kerr of United Neighborhoods for Reform felt it was time for the community to celebrate reuse in Portland.

The result of this is PDX RUST, or Portland ReUse for Societal Transformation. The basic premise of PDX Rust is this: A national conference on building materials reuse is coming to town; how can we get the local community involved with this issue and this resource of expertise?  By inviting venues like cafes and stores to host speaking events where 3 speakers talk about their experience and passion for reuse.

According to Sara Badiali, Portland loves a party, so if you create an event and give people a chance to share their passions, people will come.  The speakers can talk about reuse fashion, building materials, hacker/maker stuff — really anything to do with reuse.

This is an opportunity for DECON + REUSE ’17 conference-goers to get connected to the local community by attending, or even speaking at, PDX RUST events.  You can find out more about the events here.  Postings and calendar will be updated regularly, all the way up through the conference.  Check it out!

Source: BMRA News, July 2017

Reclamation Administration: News and Research on Building Material Waste Prevention