Tag Archives: architectural salvage

Deconstruction Of Webber Building Downtown Almost Complete – Alabama News

“A long slow goodbye”…that’s how Lois Cortell, Senior Development Manager for the city, described the deconstruction of the Webber Building, also known as the Old Montgomery Theatre downtown.The deconstruction process has been ongoing for about a year now. Cortell says it’s not to be confused with demolition.”One of the conditions of the sale was to maximize the salvage of the materials and to do that really involved a slow deconstruction” she explained.

Source: Deconstruction Of Webber Building Downtown Almost Complete – Alabama News

A Dylan Thomas snug has been rebuilt in a London pub – close to where the poet romanced his mistress – Wales Online

The bar at the exhibition at Swansea Museum, with creator Rhys Stephens, Glenda Thomas and Jeff Towns.

Author and Dylan Thomas expert Jeff Towns, who wrote book A Pearl of Great Price detailing the year-long fling, said: “It is great to see this bar lives on. It was really well put together and was a huge success in the museum. “It is fantastic too that it has found a home in an area with a connection with Dylan; he and Pearl enjoyed a river cruise along this part of The Thames, so it is perfect piece of synchronicity.

Source: A Dylan Thomas snug has been rebuilt in a London pub – close to where the poet romanced his mistress – Wales Online

A peek inside: Renovation work beginning soon on five 19th-century homes – Insider Louisville

1207 E. Broadway is one of five homes being renovated and sold as affordable houses. | Photo by Caitlin Bowling

All five homes were constructed sometime in the 1890s and are being preserved. Meanwhile, a 260-unit, multimillion-dollar apartment building is under construction in the same block. “We are seeing an entire neighborhood recreated,” said Christy Lee Brown, a local philanthropist who has helped promote historic renovation in Louisville by funding half of a historic preservation revolving loan fund.

Source: A peek inside: Renovation work beginning soon on five 19th-century homes – Insider Louisville

Out of the woods | National Post

This table used to be part of a barn. HD Threshing

Lots of companies do reclaimed, she notes. “Some are putting barn board on walls, or buying items made from shipping palettes. It’s great that this stuff is not going to landfill. Reclaimed is gaining momentum, especially with younger people.”Yet some claims about reclaimed are not all they’re cracked up to be, so buyers need to know what they’re looking for. In fact some pieces are not reclaimed wood at all, but only mass-produced wood made to look the part.

Source: Out of the woods | National Post

Oregon Coast-Inspired Home by Aspect Design Build – Midwest Home Magazine

The living room features a two-sided fireplace, reclaimed and painted mantel, and ceiling medallion.

A deliberate walkabout in the home reveals additional architectural salvage that is artfully repurposed. The stair railing in the front foyer, for example, is bookended by reclaimed iron posts. “We could only get three, so we cut the additional wood posts in the same shape,” says Winkler. The fireplace mantel in the great room, also reclaimed and then painted to match the built-in cabinetry and millwork, still shows off its dentil molding and fluted columns with the kind of wood joinery used at the turn of the century.

Source: Oregon Coast-Inspired Home by Aspect Design Build – Midwest Home Magazine

Frank Jones Brewery redo saves architectural treasures

Mat Ouellette, assistant project manager for Chinburg Properties, shows an orginal low ceiling area that still remains, before a new level is built, at the Frank Jones Brew Yard in Portsmouth. [Rich Beauchesne/Seacoastonline]

“The quality is amazing,” said Spitzer, about the wood planks with aged patina. Spitzer said a local craftsman will use some of the timbers to make club room fixtures and tables, mill some for shelving and use other old planks for finish work. More of the pine timbers will be reused for counter tops and furniture, he said.

Source: Frank Jones Brewery redo saves architectural treasures

A salvager’s decades-long dream to build a museum of architectural artifacts – Curbed

Preserving part of the the Rivoli Theater in St. Louis Courtesy National Building Arts Center

“I just love old buildings,” Giles said. “It’s a big collection, without a doubt, the largest that I’m aware of, and the idea was to develop it as a comprehensive study collection. The idea has grown into a collection of pieces from all over the country. The history here is a national history.”

Source: A salvager’s decades-long dream to build a museum of architectural artifacts – Curbed

Rejuvenation Opens NYC Store

Rejuvenation was founded to help customers restoring old houses, but most today spurn interiors that reference a single period or style. “We decided to help people live eclectically,” explains Alex Bellos, a West Elm veteran who is now senior vice president and general manager. “Designers are looking for unique pieces with a story behind them, and we have things they can build a room around.”

Source: Rejuvenation Opens NYC Store

GOING FOR $2 A FOOT

John Mangelos and brother-in-law Allen Velthoen check out the interior of the Barnwood Restaurant building as they wait for wood buyers to come through their front door. GLENN KAHL/The Bulletin

They had devised a plan to tear down five old barns at no cost to the farmers in the valley and used the wood for their new family restaurant 37 years ago.

Longtime chef and owner John Mangelos said the second floor wood in the “haunted” private dining room was originally intended for a Victorian home that was never built. He said he was fortunate to find it, but extremely puzzled how the young ghosts were included in the purchase.

 

Source: GOING FOR $2 A FOOT

Reclaiming the past: How to make old homes new — without sacrificing character

Richard and Petrina Delman wanted architectural salvage items to retain the charm and authenticity of their family’s Ontario home, which was built in the late 1880s. (Will Lester-SCNG-Inland Valley Daily Bulletin)

“People who own old and historic homes are just like old car collectors,” he said. “We want them to look as much like the absolute originals as possible.”

Architectural salvage helps homeowners such as the Delmans recapture the beauty and authenticity of their original structures. For others, it can offer nostalgic reuse to replicate the comfort and feel of the old and not-so-ordinary.

Source: Reclaiming the past: How to make old homes new — without sacrificing character

How historic rooms get moved and reused – Curbed

The dining room at the White Swan hotel. The paneling used to be in the First Class lounge of the RMS Olympic. Courtesy of Creative Commons.

“Paneling is just a skin that fits onto the architectural structure of the building, not usually a fundamental part of the building” adds Goss. “It’s like a giant 3D puzzle, and if it can be put together, it can be taken apart.”

Source: How historic rooms get moved and reused – Curbed

Hidden Treasure Abandoned Buildings: Changing Philly’s Demolition Game « CBS Philly

Philadelphia Community Corps executive director Greg Trainor inside a worksite in Fairmount. (Credit: Tom Rickert)

The job training nonprofit he [Greg Trainor] started in 2014 has graduated 18 students into OSHA-certified deconstruction technicians in the past year. He’s opened a 20,000 square foot warehouse in Kensington with classrooms and space for construction projects. And Greg and his job trainees have salvaged more than 50 tons of wood, metal, and building material from the bones of Philadelphia’s abandoned buildings.

Source: Hidden Treasure Abandoned Buildings: Changing Philly’s Demolition Game « CBS Philly

What’s old is new again | News | suwanneedemocrat.com

Mary Anne & Bubba McCray’s company ReVision recycles, repurposes, and reclaims old wood for new projects and products.

When I asked her how her company, ReVision, got started she said, “We like old stuff.” She started out by making birdhouses and small tables. Mary Anne would take what she made to the master gardener plant sales. In 2015 Bubba started helping her and the business officially started. One of the neatest things about their creations is the material they use. They mainly use the wood from old barns and houses.

Source: What’s old is new again | News | suwanneedemocrat.com

Nonprofit’s founder has 2 missions: Save history, help veterans | Metro | stltoday.com

The nonprofit Refab does sustainable deconstruction

ReFab Founder Eric Scharz. Photo by J.B. Forbes.

Schwarz’s experience had taught him that in an increasingly imitative world, some people hungered for an authenticity conceived in the marriage of age and use.

He founded Refab, a salvage yard in south St. Louis, in a condemned building four years ago. At the time, he had about $3,000 in his pocket and an idea for salvaging discarded building materials and turning around the lives of veterans. Today, Schwarz leases a 40,000-square-foot warehouse off Gravois Avenue and employs 14 people. His budget for 2017 is $1.2 million. That growth is partly attributable to a backlash against the uniformity produced by globalization.

The customers who frequent this two story red-brick repository of rescued material are weary of seeing the same furniture, the same sinks and the same light fixtures — all of it mass-produced on the other side of the planet. “You go into a lot of houses — and I don’t know if we coined the phrase — but they are all ‘Lowes’d up,’” said Randy Miller, who was looking for material for his coffee shop in Southern Illinois. “This is a like a candy store.”

Source: Nonprofit’s founder has 2 missions: Save history, help veterans | Metro | stltoday.com

Ex-offenders have a new purpose while repurposing Rockford mansion

Bill Howard moves a piece of lumber across the table on Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016, at the Hill House in Rockford. Howard hopes to repurpose all the lumber in the North Main Street mansion through a process known as “historic deconstruction.” KAYLI PLOTNER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER/RRSTAR.COM

Marks and the other men in this house can’t easily find steady work because of their criminal history. They’ve been brought here and hired by Bill Howard, a city-licensed demolition contractor who used to design landfills and now spends his days trying not to fill them up.

 Howard, 72, is an evangelist of “historic deconstruction,” the process of carefully stripping historically salvageable material from buildings and reusing it.

Source: Ex-offenders have a new purpose while repurposing Rockford mansion

Nearly 2,000 square feet of vintage lumber salvaged from Dibbleville house – Tri-County Times: News For Fenton, Linden, Holly MI

TRI-COUNTY TIMES | TIM JAGIELO
While the landscaping is still well tended, the house on Shiawassee Avenue, as of Friday, Sept. 9, was nearly gone.

“We’ve been building homes for years, and have demolished a lot,” said Bloomingdale. “I always felt bad about disposing of material that we’re never going to find again. Slow-growth lumber doesn’t exist anymore and here we are throwing it away.”  That’s why Bloomingdale decided to get himself a warehouse and start dismantling and reusing materials out of these homes.

Source: Nearly 2,000 square feet of vintage lumber salvaged from Dibbleville house – Tri-County Times: News For Fenton, Linden, Holly MI

Revive Pontiac teaches job skills, harvests vintage building materials

Brandon Shirlee of Pontiac works on the interior of a long-vacant building on West Huron near the former Pontiac Central High School. Shirlee is one of 10 workers who are learning job skills while harvesting wood, tile and more from aging buildings to sell in the vintage building materials market. Anne Runkle — The Oakland Press

“You can’t buy 100-year-old oak anymore,” said Ron Borngesser, OLHSA chief executive officer, as he explained the value of harvesting materials from the building, which dates to 1920. It has been vacant for about three decades and had recently been home to squatters, he said. OLHSA is working in cooperation with Architectural Salvage Warehouse of Detroit, a nonprofit organization that promotes the environmental advantages of diverting reusable building materials from landfills, as well as the job training benefits.

Source: Revive Pontiac teaches job skills, harvests vintage building materials

Hoover-Mason Trestle wins regional Urban Land Institute award | LVB

The Hoover-Mason Trestle is a one-third mile long elevated walkway in South Side Bethlehem./Photo courtesy ULI Philadelphia.

Completed last fall, the $15.4 million Hoover-Mason Trestle is a one-third mile long elevated walkway that links South Side Bethlehem properties such as the Sands Casino Resort-Bethlehem and SteelStacks.

Source: Hoover-Mason Trestle wins regional Urban Land Institute award | LVB

A Haven for New York Relics Saved From the Trash Heap. In Connecticut. – The New York Times

Evan Blum, 59, has filled a complex of buildings in Ivoryton, Conn., with architectural artifacts, many of them recovered from New York City buildings. Credit Christopher Capozziello for The New York Times.

Mr. Blum has been filling the buildings over the past few years with newly rescued items as well as overflow from an inventory acquired over the decades. Inside is a sea of ornamental fixtures and furnishings that have been pulled from buildings being demolished or renovated — and most of it is for sale.

Source: A Haven for New York Relics Saved From the Trash Heap. In Connecticut. – The New York Times

Farmer finds fit with salvage business

Wood Salvage

Aaron Williams stores reclaimed barnwood for his business, Willow Architectural Salvage. He says for every one barn where the wood is salvaged, another 100 are burned or bulldozed. Photos courtesy Aaron Williams.

He has been growing the Willow Architectural Salvage business ever since. “It still allows me to farm,” says Williams, who grows corn and soybeans near Waverly about 30 miles south of Springfield. “Being a farmer, I understand farm families. It’s a good fit,” he says of the business. HOWEVER, DESPITE the popularity of barn wood today, a surprising amount of barns are wasted. “For every one that we salvage about 100 get burned or bulldozed,” Williams says. Some of those barns were built 150 years ago for livestock and when equipment was smaller. Such buildings are expensive to maintain.

Source: Farmer finds fit with salvage business

OnMilwaukee.com Marketplace: Urban Spelunking: Former Laacke & Joys complex

Some of the impressive, old-growth timbers used to erect the building will be salvaged as the building is dismantled. Alas, the brick, because it was covered in lead-based paint, won’t likely be saved.

The former Laacke and Joys complex is about to change dramatically.

Source: OnMilwaukee.com Marketplace: Urban Spelunking: Former Laacke & Joys complex

Massachusetts student Sarah Hastings has been told home is illegal | Daily Mail Online

Sarah Hastings has been living in her 190-square-foot home on wheels, dubbed Rhizhome, on a parcel owned by another couple for the last year.

‘Through my interdisciplinary education at Mount Holyoke College, I brainstormed a way to do this; by graduation I had competed the design and construction of my own mobile tiny home and received high honors in Architectural Studies for my work.  ‘I sourced all of my material from salvage yards, craigslist, and local businesses within a 200 mile radius of my building site.  ‘Local professionals, friends, and my father contributed their skills and knowledge to my project, which ensured a safe and informed home.’

Sarah Hastings (pictured) was given a day to move out. She says she’ll try to find another location for her house

Source: Massachusetts student Sarah Hastings has been told home is illegal | Daily Mail Online

Determined carpenter uses salvaged materials to build his Craftsman home (photos) | OregonLive.com

Carpenter Brian Skinner of Washougal, Washington, took 14 years to build a Craftsman-style house from salvaged wood, stained glass and other elements from the 1900s or earlier. Janet Eastman/The Oregonian

“I love the dignity of clear, vertical grain Doug fir and cedar. It’s quiet,” he says. “You put a varnish on it and it looks like it was dipped in honey.” Skinner, a second-generation carpenter, could have created a museum to display the architectural pieces he rescued from grand residences that were being torn down in the 1960s and 1970s. Instead, he saved the pieces and decades later, built a home for himself.

Source: Determined carpenter uses salvaged materials to build his Craftsman home (photos) | OregonLive.com

Architectural salvage gives a home some character

AlbanyRadiators

Old-time radiators are common items seen at salvage shops like Historic Albany Parts Warehouse. (Photo: Provided)

In honor of Earth Day on April 22, consider purchasing used items that promote the motto of the three Rs: reduce, re-use and recycle. By incorporating architectural salvage items into your next project, you not only keep usable items out of the landfill, but you can also add a bit of history into your own home at significant savings..

ReHouse door plates

ReHouse Architectural Salvage in Rochester has a variety of door plates and other items from older homes upstate. (Photo: Provided)

Source: Architectural salvage gives a home some character

Industrial-chic wallpaper makes the new look old – Houston Chronicle

To create the Reclaimed collection, the company’s creative director wandered through antique markets and architectural salvage yards in old New England towns. The prints imitate what he saw: Slabs of concrete, old whitewashed boards, tin ceiling tiles. They’re all made to look old, with the patina of age; there’s weathered wood, reclaimed brick, gritty corrugated metal. The collection includes a few prints with specific images, including stacks of wooden crates and rows of old-fashioned post-office mailboxes.

Source: Industrial-chic wallpaper makes the new look old – Houston Chronicle

Picking Indiana: Couple’s salvage barn increasingly popular

Customers lined up at the door for the 10 a.m. opening. Customers pored over antique items at a once a month sale at the Small Town Salvage store in Bargersville Sunday January 17, 2016. Rob Goebel/Daily Journal

Small Town Salvage is a monthly pop-up event outside of Bargersville, bringing hundreds of people to scour their displays and bins looking for the perfect accent for their homes. Their popularity has stemmed from the increasingly trendy concept of up-cycling the old into something new. “We have to go out and physically hunt for this stuff. We’re looking for the barns, driving around the country, cold-picking,” Obergfell Gindling said.

Source: Picking Indiana: Couple’s salvage barn increasingly popular

Unsung Salvage Design Co. to open in Hamilton this spring | www.journal-news.com

Dondi Carder (from left), Justin Carder, Jason Carder and Scott Hubbard, owners of Unsung Salvage Design Company, partially furnished a model apartment at Artspace Hamilton Lofts. They are opening up Unsung Salvage Design’s retail space at 212B Main Street in April or early May. NICK GRAHAM/STAFF

 

“We like to take pieces from a client that maybe were discarded … and repurpose them into something else,” he said, offering as an example a crib used by three generations of a Hamilton family and repurposed by the business as a bench to be used at the foot of the client’s grandmother’s bed.

Source: Unsung Salvage Design Co. to open in Hamilton this spring | www.journal-news.com

Renovated Garage is the Ultimate Modern Party Space | Dwell

Glass-fronted converted garage in Washington

On Vashon Island, about 20 miles southwest of Seattle, architect Seth Grizzle designed a 440-square-foot multiuse structure for his clients Bill and Ruth True.

To pay homage to the original building, Graypants salvaged some of the old walls for the flooring, sections of which can be lifted to reveal embedded mattresses for sleeping or daytime lounging. This hide-and-reveal theme plays out elsewhere: a custom Corian bookshelf converts into a speakeasy-style bar for entertaining. In the back, the firm left an L-shaped section of the original garage walls in place; it shields an outdoor shower on one side and functions as an entry hallway on the other.

Reading nook facing glass wall facade in converted garage

The Trues host parties in the glass-walled structure, located steps from their vacation home, or they escape to it to catch some rays and read a book. Bill reclines on cushions hidden under the reclaimed-fir floorboards that are propped up with Sugatsune hinges.

Source: Renovated Garage is the Ultimate Modern Party Space | Dwell

Whitefish, Montana Seeking Bids to Remove Buildings, Materials from Donated Park Land – Flathead Beacon

City Manager Chuck Stearns said the city is inviting sealed bids from anyone who might want to purchase any of the buildings and either move them off the property or salvage materials, such as barn wood, from the buildings and salvage the contents.

via Whitefish Seeking Bids to Remove Buildings, Materials from Donated Park Land – Flathead Beacon.

Parts of demolished Belleview Biltmore will live on – Story | FOX 13 Tampa Bay

“I’ve been there before, I spent my teen years in Clearwater and I know that it has historical significance” she said. “I’m attracted to architectural artifacts- salvage, for the history that it brings, that it could potentially could bring to my home.”

via Parts of demolished Belleview Biltmore will live on – Story | FOX 13 Tampa Bay.

Antique salvage crew works to save a bit of DeLand history before wrecking ball | News-JournalOnline.com

ake Thomas from Florida Victorian Architectural Salvage & Antiques works to remove antique architecture from the historic Gould Building in downtown DeLand before it is demolished to make way for a Courtyard by Marriott hotel. News-Journal/JIM TILLER

Workers with Florida Victorian Architectural Salvage & Antiques are pulling out everything from floors to doors in the Gould Building, at the northwest corner of Wisconsin Avenue and Woodland Boulevard.

They are also salvaging reusable pieces from a house immediately behind it that’s also going to be torn down.

“Most of what we do we take it out by hand carefully because it’s going to be refurbished and reused,” said Mark Shuttleworth, owner of Florida Victorian, a business also located in downtown DeLand. “For instance, a big deal here will be the antique floors.”

via Antique salvage crew works to save a bit of DeLand history before wrecking ball | News-JournalOnline.com.

Want to live in a Victorian mansion? – Courier-Post

34 E. Centre Street in Woodbury was built in 1880 accordingThe Bonfiglio house on Newton Avenue is an 1893 Victorian, Wednesday, Dec. 9.  Sean M. Fitzgerald/Staff Photographer

The most satisfying discovery was the stained glass window on the second floor. The former owners covered it with plaster and a cabinet.

“That was fun to uncover and have the light come through for the first time in 70 years,” Shaw said.

The house is a “diamond in the rough,” he said.

“Buying something and being able to bring it back to its potential maybe will inspire other people to move into the area and takes those houses that have good bones, but need TLC,” Shaw explained.

Shaw and Bonfiglio rely on architectural salvage yards in Philadelphia and Woodbury Antiques — a Broad Street antiques mall — for pieces. Shaw pulled rounded top shutters for his exterior third-floor windows from the salvage yards. Bonfiglio found the shutters from The Dakota at the antique shop.

635854379865951415-Newton-13.JPG

Owner Brian Bonfiglio talks about renovation work he’s done inside his 1893 Victorian house. (Photo: Sean M. Fitzgerald/Staff Photo)

via Want to live in a Victorian mansion?.

Take A Look Inside The Beautiful New Retail Space For Will Leather Goods

IMG_1511

Will, together with his daughter Shane, designed the store in partnership with Birmingham-based McIntosh Poris Associates, the  lead architect of the store, and Micco Construction in Pontiac and Architectural Salvage Warehouse Detroit completed the build out.

The painstaking attention to detail in its design was met with a commitment to maintaining some of the original look of the space, and an effort to utilize locally sourced building materials.

“The design was inspired by the original elements of the building – tile, terrazzo floor, exposing the ceiling,” says Shane.

IMG_1535

via Take A Look Inside The Beautiful New Retail Space For Will Leather Goods.

Reuse Centers: Ways to Optimize Partnerships Series – Curriculum Design – by Sara Badiali

Curriculum Design is the second of in a series of five articles about partnership optimization for the building material reuse community. 

 

Reuse Centers: Ways to Optimize Partnerships Series

One of the benefits of starting the Reclamation Administration is that I get to see how reuse centers optimize partnerships within the community.

Like churches or pubs, reuse centers can be a pivotal gathering place. If done well, the physical detritus of the community flows through a reuse center. Neighbors stop and talk with each other over finds and projects, suggestions are made and advice is given. I’ve seen reuse centers inspire creativity that transcend individual projects and develop into community initiatives.  Material with history motivates people to collaborate and build both projects and relationships.

 

Curriculum Design

Schools and reuse centers are natural partners.  Before leaving the reuse center I where I worked I was collaborating with interior design professor Amanda Davis of Portland Community College.  We were developing a curriculum for students on how to design with reclaimed materials.  We were focusing on the importance of scouting materials before designing, and frequenting reuse centers to establish types of inventories.

In other words, to design well with reclaimed materials go early and often, to get to know your reuse center well. Then match your client’s needs based on your material expertise.

For example tile was always abundant where I worked, so a student could discuss saving money with a frugal client, or selling a mosaic style to a creative client.  Her design class would be required to spend half the day volunteering at the reuse center to handle the materials and see how they are categorized.  The rest of the day would be spent in a design charrette working with the materials they handled earlier in the day.

This keeps the students on site at the center learning about materials.  It also benefits the center not only with volunteers for half a day, but with a generation of designers confident in reuse.

Educational immersion is an excellent learning technique, which produces exceptional results in students.  The effect is professionals returning to the business they are emotionally bonded to, in this case the reuse center.

The students from Amanda Davis’s design class went on to win the design competition at the 2013 Portland Home and Garden using reclaimed materials.

 

Next Up: House as Showcase

The Reclamation Administration is a great databank for reuse centers collaborative partnerships.  There are a few that stand out as particularly successful models.  Partnerships are an excellent way to get exposure, marketing, materials, and revenue, while supporting the local community.

Stay tuned for the next article in the series on partnering with empty or blighted houses to showcase hard to display materials.

Q+A: Anne Nicklin, Executive Director of the Building Materials Reuse Association, on Material Salvage | Architect Magazine

Anne Nicklin, executive director at the Chicago-based Building Materials Reuse Association

What should the architecture community know about building-material salvage and reuse?

Architects are becoming more curious about how to design for reuse. We get a lot of questions about selection—for example, how to pick out doors and store them for a few years [until the project is complete]. I encourage people to think about the process the same way they think about stone. You can specify a stone finish and then, often, when you’re ready for it in construction you can pick out your piece from what’s available. I don’t think architects realize how much they can reuse on their own sites. On most sites there’s a building that came down and still has a lot of [functional] materials—plywood, joists, glulam, stud walls, commercial steel—that are incredibly expensive to buy but are undervalued in the reuse market.

Decon16-logo-bannerEagele

via Q+A: Anne Nicklin, Executive Director of the Building Materials Reuse Association, on Material Salvage | Architect Magazine | Products, Salvaged Materials, Renewable Materials, Recycled Materials, Sustainable Materials.

Around Town: Local architectural salvage gets a new home | The Franklin

Around Town: Local architectural salvage gets a new home

“I think having a salvage shop shows Franklin Heritage, Inc.’s mission of restoring buildings instead of tearing down structures and using new materials and resources to rebuild on those sites,” said Rob Shilts, executive director of Franklin Heritage.

via Around Town: Local architectural salvage gets a new home | The Franklin.

FOR SALE – ARCHITECTURAL SALVAGE BUSINESS – Philadelphia, PA

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Now is the best time for expanding a salvage business. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Reinvent are the mainstays of this business and it can now be yours to run with. Everyone is talking about recycling. There is no time like the present as that old adage goes.

For over thirteen years, I have gone to thousands of buildings and homes to find, bring back and resell scores of architectural items. The search has brought me in contact with many interesting people and taught me an immense amount about the history of our workmanship in this country and the craft of the 200 years. This business has weathered the worse recession of my lifetime and is poised to grow under new ownership.

Right now it is compromised in its limited 6000 square feet of space and will need to be moved to a larger location. ReStore of Philadelphia, Inc. could use a 12,000 to 15,000 square foot building to really thrive and grow. I have to turn down 1/2 of what I am offered for lack of space and accessibility.

There are a dozen ways to grow the business, from online sales, more inventory, larger inventory, selling repurposed pieces made by local craftsmen, sharing space with an organic cafe, operating a custom building business with recycled materials, to expanding the inventory to include appliances, radiators, lumber etc.

I am ready to retire and want to see the business move into fresh hands and continue to serve the community of environmentally conscious people. $150,000 includes all the inventory, the corporation, the name, the website, email list (3200 people), signage and all the good will and name recognition that has been established over the past 13 years. Shown are some of the pictures of previous inventory and that is ever changing. Feel free to contact Linda at show contact info for additional information. Or stop by the business at 3016 E. Thompson St. in Phila. any Wednesday through Saturday from 10 to 5 to examine it in person. Thank you for your time and consideration.

via ARCHITECTURAL SALVAGE BUSINESS.

New Orleans Neighborhoods Scrabble For Hope In Abandoned Ruins : NPR

Despite the city's strategy of auctioning blighted properties, houses like this remain 10 years after Hurricane Katrina. Vandals have stripped the home's cypress floors and other architectural artifacts.

Despite the city’s strategy of auctioning blighted properties, houses like this remain 10 years after Hurricane Katrina. Vandals have stripped the home’s cypress floors and other architectural artifacts. Debbie Elliott/NPR

“We’ve still got a lot of blight. We’re by no means done,” says Deputy Mayor Andy Kopplin. He says the city of New Orleans is waging an aggressive battle against blight, and has made inroads.

“We’ve either fixed up or demolished somewhere between 13,000 and 15,000 units, as a city,” he says.

A poll by NPR and the Kaiser Family Foundation found that a little more than half of the people in New Orleans agree that progress has been made on dealing with destroyed and abandoned homes and other properties.

via New Orleans Neighborhoods Scrabble For Hope In Abandoned Ruins : NPR.

Recycled Kitchens, Salvaged Splendor – The New York Times

Jonathan and Barbara Pessolano’s kitchen from Green Demolitions in place, approximately. The couple also bought windows, subway tile and a marble mantel from other salvage stores. Credit Todd Heisler/The New York Times

But after visiting the store, they bought an enormous used kitchen from a house in Upper Saddle River, N.J., this past April for $11,100. Green Demolitions estimated the kitchen would have set them back about $60,000 new.

via Recycled Kitchens, Salvaged Splendor – The New York Times.

Meet the man salvaging the best of Manhattan’s architectural treasures – Quartz

“There’s this dichotomy that I deal with on a daily basis,” he says. “I’m trying to preserve the material, find (it) a new home. And then on the other side of that…look at all the condos around here. Yeah, I am a part of the gentrification.”

via Meet the man salvaging the best of Manhattan’s architectural treasures – Quartz.

Hopes fading to restore historic church, birthplace of gospel music | The Telegraph

A 1996 photo shows an interior view of Pilgrim Baptist Church during a service.

A 1996 photo shows an interior view of Pilgrim Baptist Church during a service. Walter Kale TNS

Hopes of a restoration have fallen so far that some architectural preservationists think the only remaining option might be to preserve the surviving walls and turn the site into a park.

via Hopes fading to restore historic church, birthplace of gospel music | The Telegraph.

Upcycling: Discarded objects reborn as light fixtures – Times Union

This April 19, 2015 photo shows Robert Nicholas' showroom, Splurge, in Asheville, N.C. Nicholas creates lighting fixtures by upcycling or reusing vintage objects. The fixture in the foreground is the skeletal frame from a gazebo roof, which Nicholas is converting to a showpiece fixture for a local brewery. Photo: Beth J. Harpaz, AP / APThis April 19, 2015 photo shows Robert Nicholas’ showroom, Splurge, in Asheville, N.C. Nicholas creates lighting fixtures by upcycling or reusing vintage objects. The fixture in the foreground is the skeletal frame from a gazebo roof, which Nicholas is converting to a showpiece fixture for a local brewery. (Beth J. Harpaz, AP / AP)

Yet when it comes to an object’s original purpose, Nicholas said, “I don’t really care what it was, but I’m intrigued by what it was. It really is more about the aesthetic look of it and the potential of what it can become,” along with its potential for a “wow factor.”

via Upcycling: Discarded objects reborn as light fixtures – Times Union.