Tag Archives: architecture

Architecture professor explores ‘alternate endings’ for buildings, materials – News @ Northeastern

“This idea of exploring different models of practice is really a way of looking at whether we can, as designers, have more influence over policymaking or systemic ways of affecting change,” said Li. Photo by Adam Glanzman/Northeastern University

This semester, she’s teaching a graduate research studio course, “Alternate Endings,” in which students have been studying exactly that. They’re examining the demolition of buildings, searching for places to intervene and make better use of a material or design.

Source: Architecture professor explores ‘alternate endings’ for buildings, materials – News @ Northeastern

Arkansas architecture students make plans to redesign historic stagecoach stop

PHOTO BY DAVID GOTTSCHALK
Lauren Lambert and Katie Murphy, graduate students at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, review architectural documents Friday in front of the horse barn at Fitzgerald Station in Springdale. Students from the university will come up with plans for the site, which once was a stagecoach stop on the Butterfield Overland Express mail route.

McClure, a native of Pryor, Okla., is an architecture professor and associate dean of the College of the Arts at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He said the Fitzgerald Station fits perfectly with the design studio’s goals for adaptive reuse of historic properties.Smith said the students will come back to Arkansas to present their designs to stakeholders in December.Just having the designs could be helpful for getting grants, McClure said.

Source: Arkansas architecture students make plans to redesign historic stagecoach stop

Reinventing heritage buildings isn’t new at all – the ancients did it too

With the addition of minarets, Hagia Sophia was converted from a Christian basilica to an Islamic mosque. Candace Richards, Author provided

This bold inclusion of old material in a new monument for Rome led to a whole new recycling trend in architecture. Decorative elements such as columns, capitals and architraves were given new life in buildings of the fourth century CE. The trend became so popular that new laws were created to protect public buildings from being stripped of their decoration. Only if a building could not be restored was it permitted to recycle that building’s materials.

Source: Reinventing heritage buildings isn’t new at all – the ancients did it too

Evolution of Decay: Watch American Buildings Fall Into Ruin Over 40+ Years | Urbanist

Architecture that was at its prime in the 1970s has slowly fallen into decline and often ruin thanks to decades of neglect, especially in America’s poorest and most racially segregated communities, including Gary, Detroit, Camden and Harlem.

Source: Evolution of Decay: Watch American Buildings Fall Into Ruin Over 40+ Years | Urbanist

Q+A: Anne Nicklin, Executive Director of the Building Materials Reuse Association, on Material Salvage | Architect Magazine

Anne Nicklin, executive director at the Chicago-based Building Materials Reuse Association

What should the architecture community know about building-material salvage and reuse?

Architects are becoming more curious about how to design for reuse. We get a lot of questions about selection—for example, how to pick out doors and store them for a few years [until the project is complete]. I encourage people to think about the process the same way they think about stone. You can specify a stone finish and then, often, when you’re ready for it in construction you can pick out your piece from what’s available. I don’t think architects realize how much they can reuse on their own sites. On most sites there’s a building that came down and still has a lot of [functional] materials—plywood, joists, glulam, stud walls, commercial steel—that are incredibly expensive to buy but are undervalued in the reuse market.

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via Q+A: Anne Nicklin, Executive Director of the Building Materials Reuse Association, on Material Salvage | Architect Magazine | Products, Salvaged Materials, Renewable Materials, Recycled Materials, Sustainable Materials.

LOT-EK uses recycled truck bodies to create a rooftop penthouse in NYC | Inhabitat New York City

Not only were some frames attached to the new front facade of the West Village townhouse as super unique bay windows, they were also used to build a sophisticated penthouse surrounded by a thriving rooftop garden.

via LOT-EK uses recycled truck bodies to create a rooftop penthouse in NYC | Inhabitat New York City.

Ball State Class Challenges Students to Upcycle Old Airplanes | Earth911.com

One Ball State University student designed an airplane disassembly factory to make recycling easier. Photo: Designed by Joshua Stowers

One Ball State University student designed an airplane disassembly factory to make recycling easier. Photo: Designed by Joshua Stowers

“A colleague of mine, we were sitting around one time, and I was telling him that there should be better ways to do architecture with new materials,” Eggink says of how he came up with the idea. “Then I remembered going to Arizona and scanning their graveyards — their boneyards. We have all these materials there. Nothing was happening to them, nobody was collecting them and nobody was using them.”

Though recycling airplanes and old structures for architecture is not a new concept, Eggink believes his students have the imagination and creativity to elevate aero-architecture to the next level.

“This is the kind of project that is of their generation,” Eggink says. “These are issues that they’re going to be facing. In architecture, our students try to solve problems, and throwing this curveball at architecture students is fantastic. They don’t know the end result, and they really have to work on it.”

via Ball State Class Challenges Students to Upcycle Old Airplanes | Earth911.com.

Miami students offer ideas on Depot use | Palladium-Item | pal-item.com

Students from Miami University’s department of architecture and interior design have come up with ideas for possible future use of Richmond’s former Pennsylvania Railroad Depot.

Co-owner Roger Richert called the students’ input “a new start” for efforts to bring new life to the historic building.

via Miami students offer ideas on Depot use | Palladium-Item | pal-item.com.

The Sustainable Initiatives Deconstructing Detroit | ArchDaily

As architects we generally see ourselves as providers of new buildings; we also often see architecture as a way to remedy social ills. For many architects, when presented with a social problem, we try to think of a design for a building which addresses it. But what happens when the problem itself is a surplus of buildings?

The process of deconstruction provides more jobs than demolition, which means that the work of Reclaim Detroit is vital in a city with such high unemployment, as evidenced by their profile of one of their Deconstruction Specialists Billy Brown.

Both Recycle Detroit and Reclaim Detroit are initiatives that look at demolition and the contraction of Detroit in a different way. Where many see a symptom of decline and regression, they see demolition as a resource, which rather than being a wasteful way to remove the homes of people long gone, could be a way to benefit the lives of those still living in Detroit.

via The Sustainable Initiatives Deconstructing Detroit | ArchDaily.

A Tour of the Bus | Hank Bought A Bus

Originally found this amazing project on Colossal about Hank Butittla’s Bus.  We love it because it is a call to Architecture schools to incorporate more material and hands on use in design.

Hank specifically talks about the “basic physical limitations of materials” and how valuable it is to actually work with them.  We feel the same goes for using reclaimed materials in general design.

Thank you Hank, your work inspires us!

These awesome and amazing photos are by Justin Evidon – go check out his work.

One of the primary goals during the design phase was to develop a living space in 225sqft that is as open and un-restricting as possible. In order to accomplish this, I set self-imposed guidelines that eliminated any furniture or structure above the bottom edge of the window. This allows the space to remain continuous, and maintains clear sight-lines from one end of the space to the other, even while seated. In order to accomplish this I developed a thin wall system integrating structure, insulation, electrical, lighting, and facing, leaving the interior open for occupation. The ceiling is covered in plywood flexed by compression, and the floor is reclaimed gym flooring, complete with 3-point line.

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Hank Butitta.

via A Tour of the Bus | Hank Bought A Bus.

BANGA: abandoned space age bungalows from the 1960s

BANGA: abandoned space age bungalows from the 1960s

originally designed in 1971 by an unknown designer, these space age ‘BANGA’ portable bungalows– which were originally produced by bungalows international SRL in milan, have seen better days, as they sit in a soon to be re-developed italian holiday resort.

the abandoned futuristic architectural structures …show extensive wear and tear, with cracks clearly showing in the original glass-reinforced plastic GRP shell.

…the plan accommodates options to install two folding sofa beds, a small bathroom and kitchenette, with integrated furnishings that can provide a compact and private living arrangement.  however, because of the level of neglect, restoration specialist and architect pamela voigt seeks for someone to bring these historic cabins back to their former glory.

… to help save the BANGA get in touch with pamela voigt.

via BANGA: abandoned space age bungalows from the 1960s.

Building Better Homes With Recycled Waste Materials – ICTMN.com

A decade ago in rural western Alabama two Auburn University architecture professors conceived a strategy for improving rustic living conditions while imparting practical experience to those who would design and build these structures. Called The Rural Studio, the homes combined ingenuity and quirky regionalism to introduce students to the social responsibilities of architectural practices that would provide inspirational and well-constructed buildings through the use of materials previously classified as waste.

That idea and its fledgling bits of success spread, eventually coming to the attention of architect Hank Louis in Bluff, Utah, who quickly decided it would be his mission to create similar homes. He formed a nonprofit education entity known as DesignBuildBLUFF that conceptualizes and constructs affordable homes for Navajo families currently living in substandard dwellings and harsh weather conditions—howling sub-zero temperatures in the winter, drenching rains in spring, sweltering temperatures in the summer.

The group’s website says of its effort: “Compassion can be found in a CAD file” CAD means computer-aided design and notes that “more than 2.4 million Native Americans live on or near tribal land, facing some of the worst housing conditions in the country. More than 40 percent live in overcrowded or dilapidated housing with severely inadequate infrastructure services like water and sewer.”

Mascitelli, front row, pink hat (DesignBuildBLUFF)

Read the rest of this amazing article via Building Better Homes With Recycled Waste Materials – ICTMN.com.