Tag Archives: BC

Eco ‘Unbuilding’ Ensures Material from Demolished Homes Is Re-used | The Tyee

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This North Vancouver home, at 5,000 square feet, is one of the largest projects Unbuilders has taken on. After three weeks, they have completed the front-end salvage and the strip-out of the four units. The entire project, from start to finish, is estimated to take six weeks. Photo by Michelle Gamage.

And now, as some 3,000 homes are being torn down in Metro Vancouver each year, the material is being sent to landfill or, in the case of the lumber, being burned for heat or energy. “It’s really not waste — it is wasted. This is all reusable material,” Corneil said, gesturing around the home.

Source: Eco ‘Unbuilding’ Ensures Material from Demolished Homes Is Re-used | The Tyee

North Vancouver rail shed has a future — as a hay barn in Langley

Holy-Cats! This guy is awesome!

North Vancouver rail shed has a future — as a hay barn in Langley

George Robson is laboriously deconstructing the B.C. Rail station in North Vancouver, and moving much of it to his south Langley farm.

At age 73, he’s certainly old enough to know better.

“I should be,” laughs the septuagenarian.

“I’ve retired twice, but it didn’t take.

“So I’m still working.”

Within three months — if all goes well, and he’s not sure about that — Robson intends to transform the former North Vancouver rail freight shed into a giant Langley barn for storing hay and farm equipment.

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Old wood commands premium prices

MAPLE RIDGE, BC -- JULY 15, 2012 -- Bruce MacDonald of Western Reclaimed Timber discusses his company's process of reclaiming quality construction materials in Maple Ridge on July 15, 2012.MAPLE RIDGE, BC — JULY 15, 2012 — Bruce MacDonald of Western Reclaimed Timber discusses his company’s process of reclaiming quality construction materials in Maple Ridge on July 15, 2012.

Photograph by: Wayne Leidenfrost , PNG

There’s a lot of spilled beer and good memories on the back of a flat-deck truck at Western Reclaimed Timber’s property beside the Fraser River in Maple Ridge.

Stacked on the truck is about 2,000 board feet of laminated structural beams — known as “glulams,” layers of woods bonded together — removed during construction work at the Fraser Arms Hotel on South West Marine Drive in Vancouver.

“They’re excellent,” allows Western owner Bruce MacDonald, who’s been in the wood-recycling business for 25 years. “Nothing wrong with them at all.”

Crews remove nails from the beams and use metal detectors to probe for potentially dangerous metal bits not visible to the naked eye.

The beams will be visually graded according to knots and cracks, then milled into a variety of wood products that could include tongue-and-groove flooring, timber frames, table and counter tops, decking for boats, and wraps for steel beams.

The wood may be old — made from ancient Douglas felled around the 1950s — but in today’s wood-construction market, old has never seemed newer.

“The old look is in,” MacDonald confirms. “It’s highly sought after.”

The human history of the wood also adds value to the product.

Some of the more recognizable structures from which Western has reclaimed wood include the Woodward’s Building and Drake Hotel in Vancouver, and the historic Glenrose Cannery on the Fraser River in North Delta, which was dismantled due to construction of the South Fraser Perimeter Road.

“People are often more interested in the story behind the wood than the wood itself,” MacDonald notes.

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