Tag Archives: building material reuse

SustainableScoop- Jim Schulman, Alliance for Regional Cooperation – YouTube

Founder of Community Forklift & Executive Manager of the Alliance for Regional Cooperation, Jim Schulman discusses his work on the Building Materials Reuse Association. His work in cooperation with the DC Sierra Club and others are pushing building code changes to help rescue building materials from the waste stream.

Astoria nonprofit Big Reuse will close after 12 years due to rising rents – QNS.com

Big Reuse employees picking up construction materials slated to be thrown away.

“Salvage warehouses should be increasing, not decreasing with what we know about climate change and knowing that building materials make up the largest portion of our material waste,” she said.She said that the company is “really proud of the work we’re doing” and made great strides in terms of diverting waste from landfills and encouraging Queens residents to channel their “inner sustainable-ist.”

Source: Astoria nonprofit Big Reuse will close after 12 years due to rising rents – QNS.com

New city law requires deconstruction rather than demolition – OnMilwaukee

Demolition dumps materials into landfills, boosts carbon emissions and releases asbestos and other harmful matter into the air, says Ald. Bob Bauman.

The Common Council approved the new deconstruction ordinance – which was co-sponsored by Alds. Nik Kovac and Khalif Rainey – Tuesday, and the rule that goes into effect on Jan. 1, 2018, requires deconstruction rather than demolition of most one- to four-family buildings built before 1930 that are scheduled to be razed.

Source: New city law requires deconstruction rather than demolition – OnMilwaukee

Salvage City to host building material pop-up market Saturday | Northwest Indiana Business Headlines | nwitimes.com

Steel City Salvage

“People probably have never seen anything like this,” Pytel said. “The real reason to come out is some of the beauty inside Gary’s structures that they may have passed over. There are endless possibilities with all the items that have been reclaimed.” Anyone who’s interested in more information should visit www.delta-institute.org or call Pytel at 312-554-0900.

Source: Salvage City to host building material pop-up market Saturday | Northwest Indiana Business Headlines | nwitimes.com

Owen ‘investing in the future by repurposing the past’ | Herald Citizen

John Owen talks about his passion for architectural salvage in his new shop, Dry Levee Architectural Salvage.
TY KERNEA | HERALD-CITIZEN

A lot of the items he’s salvaged have been leased for props in weddings. “That’s a trend that’s starting to really take off,” he said. Several school teachers also approached him asking about historic elements he has found. “It’s a hands-on tool for those kids,” he said. One of the first projects was the deconstruction of a log cabin that housed 10 children in the early 1900s. “It was a small cabin,” he said. “When we took it down, the grandson of one of those kids found me and asked what I did with it. He wanted us to rebuild it for him. So that’s what we did.”

Source: Owen ‘investing in the future by repurposing the past’ | Herald Citizen

Cities Need To Transition To Circular Economies: Google Wants To Help – The future of business

Another tool, called Portico, tracks the health of materials used in buildings. Google has used it internally in about 200 of its own buildings. “If you envision this world in which you’re endlessly cycling materials back into the system, it’s really critical that you know what’s in them, and that you know there’s nothing harmful,” says Brandt. Digital tools can also be used to create online marketplaces for reused building materials.

Source: Cities Need To Transition To Circular Economies: Google Wants To Help – The future of business

Frank Jones Brewery redo saves architectural treasures

Mat Ouellette, assistant project manager for Chinburg Properties, shows an orginal low ceiling area that still remains, before a new level is built, at the Frank Jones Brew Yard in Portsmouth. [Rich Beauchesne/Seacoastonline]

“The quality is amazing,” said Spitzer, about the wood planks with aged patina. Spitzer said a local craftsman will use some of the timbers to make club room fixtures and tables, mill some for shelving and use other old planks for finish work. More of the pine timbers will be reused for counter tops and furniture, he said.

Source: Frank Jones Brewery redo saves architectural treasures

Craftsman’s ‘mad science’ transforms salvaged material

Jaime Walton creates woodwork at his workshop in Railroad

Jaime Walton creates woodwork at his workshop in Railroad Square. (Photo: Jaime Walton)

Today at age 51, Walton can’t imagine himself in any other line of work and believes in interrupting the waste stream to landfills by placing discarded items back into mainstream use. In Albany, he would purchase items from salvage yards, auctions, and estates, but since arriving in Tallahassee has received many donations. He also creates with found objects, like an abandoned railroad tie whose sculptural qualities allow Walton to see it as a future fireplace mantle or bookshelf.

Source: Craftsman’s ‘mad science’ transforms salvaged material

Innowood introduces Recycling and Replacement Service to Combat Construction Waste | Architecture And Design

Every industry has a part to play in climate change and the construction industry is no different. In a 2011 report on construction and demolition waste, it was reported that ‘buildings and their users are responsible for almost a quarter of Australia’s greenhouse emissions’, of which ‘choice of materials and design principles has a significant […] impact on the energy required to construct a building.’

Approximately 42 per cent of solid waste in Australia is generated in the building industry. Waste in the construction industry affects everyone and the importance of re-using and recycling this waste cannot be emphasised enough.

Source: Innowood introduces Recycling and Replacement Service to Combat Construction Waste | Architecture And Design

Petaluma’s Sons of Salvage goes against the grain | Petaluma Argus Courier | Petaluma360.com

Aaron Beatrice & Serge Biryukov, Sons of Salvage.

The duo, friends since elementary school in Terra Linda and now in their early thirties, have stumbled upon a crowd pleasing business making unusual and one-of-a-kind wooden furniture for restaurants and other businesses. “We have been artsy and artistic and did different things with our hands. We got into woodworking by necessity,” Beatrice said. “We did not have any money to furnish our apartments so we had to make the furniture. We put photos of the things we made on Instagram and then people started ordering the furniture and we started our business.”

Source: Petaluma’s Sons of Salvage goes against the grain | Petaluma Argus Courier | Petaluma360.com

Nonprofit’s founder has 2 missions: Save history, help veterans | Metro | stltoday.com

The nonprofit Refab does sustainable deconstruction

ReFab Founder Eric Scharz. Photo by J.B. Forbes.

Schwarz’s experience had taught him that in an increasingly imitative world, some people hungered for an authenticity conceived in the marriage of age and use.

He founded Refab, a salvage yard in south St. Louis, in a condemned building four years ago. At the time, he had about $3,000 in his pocket and an idea for salvaging discarded building materials and turning around the lives of veterans. Today, Schwarz leases a 40,000-square-foot warehouse off Gravois Avenue and employs 14 people. His budget for 2017 is $1.2 million. That growth is partly attributable to a backlash against the uniformity produced by globalization.

The customers who frequent this two story red-brick repository of rescued material are weary of seeing the same furniture, the same sinks and the same light fixtures — all of it mass-produced on the other side of the planet. “You go into a lot of houses — and I don’t know if we coined the phrase — but they are all ‘Lowes’d up,’” said Randy Miller, who was looking for material for his coffee shop in Southern Illinois. “This is a like a candy store.”

Source: Nonprofit’s founder has 2 missions: Save history, help veterans | Metro | stltoday.com

Thrift stores for building materials ride the re-use wave – StarTribune.com

Nick Swaggert, of Better Futures, said the work he and his company do has “saved 700 tons of building materials from going into the landfill.”

With many homes over 30, trend experts expect homeowners to tackle remodeling projects as long as the economy remains strong. Thrift stores such as Habitat ReStores, now at 875 locations nationwide and 15 in Minnesota, are riding the wave too. Sales at the new location, which opened in September, are exceeding expectations. “Our New Brighton store is doing $1 million a year, and we hope the Minneapolis store will match that in two or three years,” said Pete O’Keefe, senior manager of operations at Twin Cities Habitat for Humanity.

Source: Thrift stores for building materials ride the re-use wave – StarTribune.com

Building northland careers with deconstruction: Social enterprise provides jobs, teaches skills and saves resources | Bemidji Pioneer

Workers take part in a “deconstruction” of an old motel on U.S. Highway 2 in Cass Lake.

Fisher is part of a social enterprise called Miigwech Aki, or “Thank you, Earth” led by Christopher Bedeau. The goal is to provide jobs and training in northern Minnesota, partnering with tribes and the local communities, while honoring Mother Earth by diverting resources from landfills.

Source: Building northland careers with deconstruction: Social enterprise provides jobs, teaches skills and saves resources | Bemidji Pioneer

The art of deconstruction | Local News | heraldandnews.com

Reba VanAcker and her son Christopher Green. By Gerry O’Brien H&N Editor

 

When Green put the word out on the Internet that DoubleHead had well-preserved timber from the 1930s to the 1960s, a group of Japanese buyers jumped on it. “They flew out here and were overwhelmed at what we had,” Green said. As it turns out, Japanese love all things from the West. The Japanese reproduce vintage-style door handles, lamps, clothing, etc. They use our lumber for flooring, wall coverings, doors and furniture.” “It was like watching kids in a candy store. They were literally running from place to place. We sold them four container loads of flooring,” Green said, mainly two- by 12-foot slats.

Source: The art of deconstruction | Local News | heraldandnews.com

Sound investment: CEO turns reclaimed wood into original guitars

Mark Wallace, owner of Wallace Detroit Guitars, makes his instruments from reclaimed wood salvaged from Detroit buildings. Musician Stewart Francke vouches for their quality.

“It’s a beautiful guitar. It makes you feel good to hold it. It makes you feel good to play it,” says Francke, 58, who’s recorded with Bruce Springsteen, toured with Bob Seger and opened with the guitar for Joan Jett at this year’s Arts, Beats and Eats festival. “I’ve got 25 guitars, but this one is the one that I play the most live, and it sounds probably the cleanest.”

Source: Sound investment: CEO turns reclaimed wood into original guitars

Theft of wood from barn in Qualicum Bay: Nailed down but not safe – Parksville Qualicum News

Wood planking was stripped from the wall of a 75-year-old barn alongside the Island Highway in Qualicum Bay by a trespasser earlier this month.— Image Credit: J.R. RARDON PHOTO

The barn apparently fell victim to a hot building trend, in which weathered and distressed wood from salvage buildings is used to build furniture, wall paneling and trendy bars and restaurants. “I get people here looking for it all the time,” said Bernie Muller of Demxx Deconstruction in Coombs. “You’ll have guys in Vancouver who pay $7 a square foot for those slabs. It’s probably more valuable than drugs.”

Source: Theft of wood from barn in Qualicum Bay: Nailed down but not safe – Parksville Qualicum News

Nearly 2,000 square feet of vintage lumber salvaged from Dibbleville house – Tri-County Times: News For Fenton, Linden, Holly MI

TRI-COUNTY TIMES | TIM JAGIELO
While the landscaping is still well tended, the house on Shiawassee Avenue, as of Friday, Sept. 9, was nearly gone.

“We’ve been building homes for years, and have demolished a lot,” said Bloomingdale. “I always felt bad about disposing of material that we’re never going to find again. Slow-growth lumber doesn’t exist anymore and here we are throwing it away.”  That’s why Bloomingdale decided to get himself a warehouse and start dismantling and reusing materials out of these homes.

Source: Nearly 2,000 square feet of vintage lumber salvaged from Dibbleville house – Tri-County Times: News For Fenton, Linden, Holly MI

Portland Promotes Deconstruction Over Demolition – Next City

(Credit: Lovett Deconstruction)

“We’re providing money to these projects but we’re getting something back,” says Wood. “We’re getting hard data but then also some softer stuff like lessons learned.” That feedback helped inform the deconstruction ordinance. Grant recipients were required to place a sign on the site of an active deconstruction, for example, to educate the public and promote the method. The ordinance requires signage too. The grants will continue; they’ve recently been increased to $3,000.

Source: Portland Promotes Deconstruction Over Demolition – Next City

Daylighting, demolition and disaster resilience: BRE Trust is making headway on green building research

Building Research Establishment Trust is working on several research projects focused on mitigation and resilience to climate change

Another research project last year also looked at the impacts of deconstruction – or, essentially, demolishing buildings – on the circular economy, as “effectively dealing with buildings at the end of their life has the potential to unlock significant economic value”, according to the Trust. Construction and the built environment is the single biggest user of materials and generator of waste in the UK economy, but the value that can be extracted from deconstruction is very much dependent on how buildings have been designed and built.

Source: Daylighting, demolition and disaster resilience: BRE Trust is making headway on green building research

A Surprising Fact About Medieval Europeans: They Recycled | Atlas Obscura

Two leaves from The Mirror of Human Salvation. These pages were reused as a wrapper for a book at some later time. The ghosting of the book it adorned can still be seen in the dark, abraded portion that spans the two pages. (Image: The Walters Art Museum/CC-0)

According to Fleming, the British raided Roman ruins for building materials  to the extent that until the 11th century, Christian churches in Britain were constructed mostly from scavenged Roman materials. This assertion has been verified through architectural surveys, one of which discovered over 300 churches around London built from Roman ruins. Similarly, tile, ceramics, pottery, and iron were all reclaimed and repurposed.

Source: A Surprising Fact About Medieval Europeans: They Recycled | Atlas Obscura

Determined carpenter uses salvaged materials to build his Craftsman home (photos) | OregonLive.com

Carpenter Brian Skinner of Washougal, Washington, took 14 years to build a Craftsman-style house from salvaged wood, stained glass and other elements from the 1900s or earlier. Janet Eastman/The Oregonian

“I love the dignity of clear, vertical grain Doug fir and cedar. It’s quiet,” he says. “You put a varnish on it and it looks like it was dipped in honey.” Skinner, a second-generation carpenter, could have created a museum to display the architectural pieces he rescued from grand residences that were being torn down in the 1960s and 1970s. Instead, he saved the pieces and decades later, built a home for himself.

Source: Determined carpenter uses salvaged materials to build his Craftsman home (photos) | OregonLive.com

Architectural salvage gives a home some character

AlbanyRadiators

Old-time radiators are common items seen at salvage shops like Historic Albany Parts Warehouse. (Photo: Provided)

In honor of Earth Day on April 22, consider purchasing used items that promote the motto of the three Rs: reduce, re-use and recycle. By incorporating architectural salvage items into your next project, you not only keep usable items out of the landfill, but you can also add a bit of history into your own home at significant savings..

ReHouse door plates

ReHouse Architectural Salvage in Rochester has a variety of door plates and other items from older homes upstate. (Photo: Provided)

Source: Architectural salvage gives a home some character

Champlain Oil Donates, Dismantles House To Make Way For Larger Jiffy Mart | The Chester Telegraph

The blue porch ceiling and lattice work come down.

According to Eric Kruger of Deconstruction Works, everything that can be reused will be removed and recycled while only materials that can’t be reused will be sent to a landfill. “After 10 days of work,” Kruger said, “we’re still on our first dumpster of trash.” Kruger noted that the timber frame materials as well as older hemlock and spruce framing and sheathing would go to Vermont Restoration Materials for re-manufacturing while architectural details have been sold to Tillotson Trading of East Corinth.

Eric Kruger of Deconstruction Works in the attic of the Burbank house. All photos by Shawn Cunningham

Source: Champlain Oil Donates, Dismantles House To Make Way For Larger Jiffy Mart | The Chester Telegraph

Muskegon: Bring us your blight | 2016-03-25 | Grand Rapids Business Journal

This November 2015 photo shows a blighted house being demolished on Sanford Street in Muskegon Heights.

“(It is) looking at a large catchment area of the entire Great Lakes and utilizing the Port of Muskegon to bring in that material from other cities throughout the Great Lakes, repurpose it here in Muskegon, and then ship it back out through the Port of Muskegon,” said Kuhn. The study builds on the work Michigan State University researchers began more than a year ago when they looked at blighted homes and structures in Muskegon Heights. MSU worked in partnership with Muskegon County at the time.

Source: Muskegon: Bring us your blight | 2016-03-25 | Grand Rapids Business Journal

Bellingham’s co-op getting started with parking lot expansion | Bellingham Herald

RE Store workers Zack Zuniga, left, and Jake Bollinger strip the inside of the old Community Connections building on Forest Street in Bellingham on Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2016. The building is being removed and the material recycled to make way for additional parking for the Community Food Co-op store.

RE Store workers Zack Zuniga, left, and Jake Bollinger strip the inside of the old Community Connections building on Forest Street in Bellingham on Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2016. The building is being removed and the material recycled to make way for additional parking for the Community Food Co-op store. Philip A. Dwyer pdwyer@bhamherald.com

This week workers from RE Store began deconstructing the former Community Connections building on the corner of East Chestnut and North Forest streets to make way for the parking lot expansion. Once that is complete, work will begin putting in retaining walls and extra parking spaces for the store, which is at 1220 N. Forest St.

Source: Bellingham’s co-op getting started with parking lot expansion | Bellingham Herald

Gould goes, but pieces will live on | The West Volusia Beacon

Crews from Florida Victorian Architectural Antiques work to remove roof and ceiling supports from what was once a church sanctuary. BEACON PHOTO/ANTHONY DeFEO

 

“Right now we’re in the process of taking out lathe and plaster that’s in the ceiling structure here in the old church, which was built in 1892,” Shuttleworth said. “Then we’re going to take the two-by-fours and the two-by-sixes, the roof and ceiling rafters, out.”The roof’s structures consist of large beams made from heart pine, harvested from Southern longleaf pine trees that might have been two centuries or three centuries old.

Source: Gould goes, but pieces will live on | The West Volusia Beacon

Host to Super Bowl 50, Levi’s Stadium is the sustainable arena of the future | SI.com

Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, Calif.

For LEED certification, the scorecards include decisions made when building—such as the 49ers’ embrace of local public transit, use of recycled materials from the old Moffett Field and sourcing of material locally

Source: Host to Super Bowl 50, Levi’s Stadium is the sustainable arena of the future | SI.com

Old Town Bluffton buildings incorporating reclaimed materials | The Island Packet

a barn deconstructed by Tom Banach of Hardeeville. On average, about 50 to 60 percent of a structure's materials can be used in a new home.

A barn deconstructed by Tom Banach of Hardeeville. On average, about 50 to 60 percent of a structure’s materials can be used in a new home. Submitted photos by Tom Banach

“We’re taking the material from the grassroots of a barn, and we’re re-utilizing every portion of that barn,” Banach said. His company, TimberStone Antique Building Products, has seen an uptick in business as more people seek materials with a story in new construction.

Source: Old Town Bluffton buildings incorporating reclaimed materials | The Island Packet

Green Deconstruction on the Rise in NOAZ | KNAU Arizona Public Radio

Salvaging old and left over building material is essential to green deconstruction. CREDIT JUSTIN REGAN

“It just doesn’t seem necessary to have new material, these work just as well as something new. I guess it just helps eliminate waste,” says Farber. Coconino County officials say green deconstruction has been on the rise the last several years, even though it’s tough and expensive to do. It’s a burgeoning faction of the nearly three billion dollar a year green building industry.

Source: Green Deconstruction on the Rise in NOAZ | KNAU Arizona Public Radio

Recycled Buildings or Bridges? Designing for Deconstruction Beyond Adaptive Reuse

Disassembly of the Bay Bridge’s eastern span. Courtesy Sam Burbank.

This is the world architect and building scientist Bradley Guy—assistant professor of sustainable design at The Catholic University of America School of Architecture and Planning, as well as author of Unbuilding: Salvaging the Architectural Treasures of Unwanted Houses—has been slowly, arduously advocating for since the mid-1990s, when he was introduced to the idea of designing for deconstruction. Design for deconstruction (or disassembly, sometimes abbreviated DfD) is a design philosophy and set of strategies that acknowledge that the vast majority of buildings have a life span.

via Recycled Buildings or Bridges? Designing for Deconstruction Beyond Adaptive Reuse.

Design for Deconstruction: Architects should Plan for Less Waste | Moss Architecture

What moss and other designers could give a lot more more thought to, is designing for ways attach materials in a removable way.  Here are a few examples: screw on metal finish panels as opposed to tile cemented so a surface; screws in general vs nails;  no glue.  Using whole slab material  for counter tops means that it can be cut down to size to fit a second or third application.

This idea of dis-assembly or deconstruction can even be applied to structure.  A timber frame and brick building can potentially be broken down into its component pieces again.  A 2×4 or “stick frame” one likely can’t.  Building with more durable discrete “elements” increases the odds that those components can stay out of the trash, long term.

via Design for Deconstruction: Architects should Plan for Less Waste | Moss Architecture.

REUSE CENTERS: WAYS TO OPTIMIZE PARTNERSHIPS SERIES – ARTIST RESIDENCIES– BY SARA BADIALI

Artist Residencies is the final installment of articles about partnership optimization for the building material reuse community. See the entire series here

 

Reuse Centers: Ways to Optimize Partnerships Series

Artist Residencies

Art starts with raw materials and reuse centers are brimming with materials waiting to be reused.  Thus, reuse centers are filled with unrealized art.  What better way to showcase this potential than with an artist in residency?  By sponsoring an artist to commit acts of creativity, reuse centers can show off inventory and potential use in unique ways.  Recology is an artist in residency program at the Recology Solid Waste and Transfer Station in San Francisco, California. This program has sponsored over 100 artists since 1990.  Artists have unlimited access to inventory and even studio space provided by the transfer station.  Artists are required to speak to elementary school students and tour groups about using reclaimed materials and there is a two day gala event for the unveiling of the finished artwork.

There are unlimited ways to partner with artists.  The key is to find a good balance between experience, education, and the deliverable product.  Some residency programs require the artist to donate the end piece to a gallery for permanent display.  Other organizations hold an auction for the final product and use the proceeds for funding purposes.  The unveiling, gala, or celebration for art is an important event.  Reuse centers are utilitarian by nature, so to express the value of a beautiful creation make sure the party is off site and fancy.

Fine art is one type of reuse possibility, but reuse centers that carry wood will benefit from craftspeople who make custom furniture.  For many people the desirability of having a custom piece of furniture by an artist, is a chance to own an heirloom.  Reclaimed wood from a local landmark or historical building that is crafted into furniture, is a functional piece of history. When done beautifully these pieces really are unique, valuable for both their craft and their connection to place and time.

Partnering with artists and craftspeople in residency programs can facilitate unlimited opportunities.  The benefits of partnership include supporting local craftsmen and burgeoning artists, but also funding opportunities.  Art organizations have loyal patrons because many people feel strongly about supporting the arts. Reuse centers are in the excellent position of supplying materials for art, but also education in both craft and reuse.  An organization that combines collaboration with artists, providing education, environmental benefits, and supporting the local economy in jobs and goods, is a great investment for funders.  In many cases a reuse center can adopt an arts program with little administrative or policy changes, and the value is limitless.

 

 Consulting

The Reclamation Administration is a great databank for reuse centers collaborative partnerships.  There are a few that stand out as particularly successful models.  Partnerships are an excellent way to get exposure, marketing, materials, and revenue, while supporting the local community.

Contact me if you are interested in learning more on collaborative partnerships for your reuse outlet.

Design build social venture Project RE launches with big goals in North Point Breeze – Pittsburgh Business Times

From left to right: Steve Shelton, executive director of the Trade Institute of Pittsburgh; John Folan, professor of architecture at Carnegie Mellon University; and Mike Gable, executive director of Construction Junction.From left to right: Steve Shelton, executive director of the Trade Institute of Pittsburgh: John Folan, professor of architecture at Carnegie Mellon University; and Mike Gable, executive director of Construction Junction.

With $2.3 million in funding support from organizations that include the Heinz Endowments and the Colcom and RK Mellon foundations, Project RE launches as a 10,000 square foot production facility within Construction Junction in which architecture students within the UDBS work with the apprentice laborers from the Trade Institute of Pittsburgh, which operates a few blocks away, to design and build new affordable housing and other prototype products out of reused materials collected by neighboring retail operation.

via Design build social venture Project RE launches with big goals in North Point Breeze – Pittsburgh Business Times.

Reuse Centers: Ways to Optimize Partnerships Series – Reuse Contests – by Sara Badiali

Reuse Contests is the first of in a series of five articles about partnership optimization for the building material reuse community. 

 

Reuse Centers: Ways to Optimize Partnerships Series

One of the benefits of starting the Reclamation Administration is that I get to see how reuse centers optimize partnerships within the community.

Like churches or pubs, reuse centers can be a pivotal gathering place. If done well, the physical detritus of the community flows through a reuse center. Neighbors stop and talk with each other over finds and projects, suggestions are made and advice is given. I’ve seen reuse centers inspire creativity that transcend individual projects and develop into community initiatives.  Material with history motivates people to collaborate and build both projects and relationships.

 

Reuse Contests

Reuse Contests are growing in popularity.  Over the years some contests have developed from community gatherings into grand events.  Entire galas have grown out of simple DIY challenges.  Nothing gets the competitive juices flowing like media coverage and a party.

The Post-Gazette and Construction Junction joined forces and created the Reuse Inspiration Contest. People sent in photos of their home renovation projects and three won tickets to the Big Pour, a beer festival sponsored by a brewery in Pittsburg.  The reuse center Construction Junction, the Post-Gazette and the brewery attracted lots of publicity but also provided the community with inspiration in creative reuse.

Other events like these include catwalks complete with fashions made from recycled materials.  CART’M, a reuse and recycling center on the Oregon coast, presents the TRASHION show every year to a sold out crowd of hundreds.

These contests have expanded into categories from structures that are integrated into buildings, to fine art displayed in local galleries. A community in Arizona established a yearly event called The Big Heap, complete with reuse categories and a market. The festival is so big now that it is a music venue for national bands and is covered by HGTV.  Reuse contests are an effective platform for jumping off into greater reuse possibilities.

 

Next Up: Curriculum Design

The Reclamation Administration is a great databank for reuse centers collaborative partnerships.  There are a few that stand out as particularly successful models.  Partnerships are an excellent way to get exposure, marketing, materials, and revenue, while supporting the local community.

Stay tuned for the next article in the series on partnering with educational institutions to create reuse curriculum.

What a load of rubbish – Coast Culture – Oregon Coast Today

Who can forget Julie “Fig” Yanko’s trashion made from badminton shuttlecocks, drapery fringe and upcycled sheepskin fleece? • Photo by LeeAnn Neal

The famed event celebrates the art of turning waste materials into wearable “trashion,” showcasing the myriad ways local designers use their imaginations to transform trash into couture.

“We turn the NCRD Auditorium into our version of a New York-style runway show,” said CARTM Executive Director Karen Reddick-Yurka. “The amount of creativity on our local runway blows any New York designer out of the waste stream.”

For tickets and more information, call 503-368-7764.

via What a load of rubbish – Coast Culture – Oregon Coast Today.

Introducing ReuseWood.org: The North American Wood Reuse and Recycling Directory

Reuse Wood Web Capture 1

“The demand for reclaimed wood products has been steadily increasing as consumers recognize and value the look, feel, functionality and cost of reused wood in products such as flooring, furniture, structural timbers and more. The North American Wood Reuse and Recycling Directory will connect demand and supply to ensure the continued growth of this reclaimed wood market, while simultaneously keeping thousands of tons of wood out of landfills,” said BMRA Executive Director Anne Nicklin.

Features of ReuseWood.org:

The business directory is accessible via both map and list, with easy sorting capabilities according to target categories (location, services provided, etc).

Individual listing pages show the contact information, location and available services for each business.

The sustainable wood guide includes useful information and articles on the different wood products and the opportunities for wood reuse or recycling.

Reuse Wood Web Capture 2

Canadian Wood Council

reusewood.org.

Old factory’s bricks, wood are saved. And that’s lucky for Notre Dame. – South Bend Tribune: Business

 

Brick, wood being save from South Bend factory

Six buildings that are part of the former Wilson Brothers Shirt Co. factory — located along Sample Street, a block west of Chapin Street — are being deconstructed. SBT Photo/GREG SWIERCZ

There’s a strong market for those materials, too.

For example, the Wilson complex — like many other factories its age — is a repository of old-growth timbers that have become extremely rare. The hard maple flooring and heart-pine support beams inside the buildings were cut from trees that had been growing for hundreds of years. Old factories are some of the last places where such wood can be found.

via Old factory’s bricks, wood are saved. And that’s lucky for Notre Dame. – South Bend Tribune: Business.

 

Alliance Francaise Events: Matieres Grises Exhibition – Recycling materials for architecture – 25th June – Events – Pulse

Nat Amarteifio is an architectural historian, writer and the former Mayor of Accra, Ghana.

As we continue to tap into natural resources to feed, house, travel, clothe and entertain ourselves, the construction field, such as agriculture, transport and energy, cannot remain unconcerned to such issues. To build differently, several strategies must be used. The reemployment of material is one of them.

via Alliance Francaise Events: Matieres Grises Exhibition – Recycling materials for architecture – 25th June – Events – Pulse.

Reclaiming pieces from the past – Freshwater

Rustbelt ReclamationBOB PERKOSKI

Salvaged wood decking from the Columbus Road Bridge acquired by Old School and sand casting forms from Taylor & Boggis Foundry Co. acquired by Rustbelt Reclamation were used to build customized tables at The Corner, the much-anticipated bar at Progressive Field nestled in the stands in right field. Rustbelt Reclamation upcycled the old materials into customized furniture.

 Zora Eizember showing (ARC)form designs in the bathroom at TheSpotted Owl

BOB PERKOSKI

via Reclaiming pieces from the past.

This old cottage: Times Argus Online

Stefan Hard / Staff Photo Slate, still in good condition, will be carefully removed from this roof on a buiding inside the Waterbury State Complex so the material can be reused for new or renovated construction.

“The idea is to keep materials out of landfills, and reuse building materials,” said Surwilo, who noted the approach is part of a new mindset in state government that is gaining momentum.

Deconstruction of the 1930’s home would also provide about three months work and valuable experience for a deconstruction crew, some members of which were trained for such work with assistance from a federal EPA grant to ReSource and Yestermorrow Design School.

via This old cottage  : Times Argus Online.

Detroit’s 70,000 abandoned homes a treasure trove for rubble-sifting artisans: ‘It’s like a treasure hunt’ | Financial Post

Bryan Mitchell/BloombergReclaim Detroit workers salvage wood from an abandoned house on Elmhurst Street in Detroit, Michigan, U.S., on Wednesday, March 11, 2015. Bryan Mitchell/BloombergReclaim

“It’s like a treasure hunt,” said Craig Varterian, executive director of Reclaim Detroit, a nonprofit group that’s stripped and sold materials from almost 70 demolished homes. Floorboards and joists of early 20th century maple, walnut, hickory, fir and even chestnut are prized for their density and fine grain.

As Detroit ramps up demolitions of vacant dwellings, Mayor Mike Duggan plans a reclamation center in a city-owned building to keep tons of rubble out of landfills and create jobs and merchandise. Recycling would become a centerpiece of the city’s blight-removal effort, which is struggling to maintain funding.

Bryan Mitchell/Bloomberg

Craig Varterian, executive director of Reclaim Detroit, walks down a hall lined with reclaimed doors at the organization’s office and warehouse in Detroit, Michigan, U.S., on Wednesday, March 11, 2015.

via Detroit’s 70,000 abandoned homes a treasure trove for rubble-sifting artisans: ‘It’s like a treasure hunt’ | Financial Post.

Urban Archaeology to auction historic items — how about a Parisian mermaid with a great backstory for your pool? | National Post

Guernsey's

A forerunner to the soda fountain, with taps for various flavours including Vanilla, Sarsparilla, Lemon and Root Beer. Guernsey’s

Before architectural salvage became a widely known concept, Mr. Shapiro would steal onto demolition sites to save important items, calling his group the Anonymous Art Reclamation Society, who became known as the “Gargoyle Snatchers.”

Now, his Tribeca shop is holding a huge auction of stuff collected (not stolen!) over the decades. Be there (or be on the phone), when 700 very special artifacts go under the hammer through Guernsey’s — including the mermaid and merman, above, from one of the fountains in Paris’ Place de la Concorde, items from New York’s Plaza and St. Regis hotels, and even the beautiful Edgar Brandt Deco stair rails, ceiling panels and elevator glass from Paris’ Le Bon Marché department store.

via Urban Archaeology to auction historic items — how about a Parisian mermaid with a great backstory for your pool? | National Post.

Muskegon County’s planned deconstruction-materials facility a key part in fight against blight | MLive.com

Approximately 50 properties are targeted for demolition by the end of 2010, including this home at 2627 6th St., as Muskegon Heights aims to work on their housing blight. Kendra Stanley-Mills | The Muskegon Chronicle

“Dave [Bennink, RE-USE Consulting] will be facilitating a strategic planning session,” said Jonathan Wilson, economic development coordinator for Muskegon County. “He will talk about how an operation like Second Harvest could run, the potential for a domestic and overseas market, and how the private sector could be involved and how it could benefit from it. It’s basically a brainstorming session.”

Precedent has shown that deconstruction materials from blighted homes can easily be repurposed into other products and sold to generate revenue. Community leaders think the amount of blighted homes in Muskegon County as well as its port could make it a “central hub for import and export of deconstruction materials in the future.”

via Muskegon County’s planned deconstruction-materials facility a key part in fight against blight | MLive.com.

Demolition planning as part of construction – reuse and recycling of parts improves the eco-efficiency of buildings

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland studied the reuse of structural elements in the ReUSE (Repetitive Utilization of Structural Elements) project, which recently ended. VTT also proposes the development requirements for improving the planning linked with demolition and repair. Of these, the most pivotal are the development of the guidelines and legislation supporting reuse, in addition to showing, by means of example targets, the commercial and ecological benefits that can be obtained.

via Demolition planning as part of construction – reuse and recycling of parts improves the eco-efficiency of buildings.

Board of Directors – Call for Nominations | Building Materials Reuse Association

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Board of Directors – Call for Nominations

Event News

The BMRA is holding elections to fill open board positions with new or existing members. Please consider serving on the Board of Directors yourself, or helping to recruit someone who you think would be a good fit.

The BMRA is seeking individuals with experience in: marketing, nonprofit law, organizational development, fundraising, website optimization, accounting and financial management, business networking, event coordination, membership management and grant writing.

Responsibilities: Board members are required to attend a two hour meeting once a month, and commit to six hours of service per month. The board of directors serves as leadership and staff of the BMRA. The current year’s work plan is availible for review.

If you have any questions about board service, please contact either board chair Sara Badiali at Sara.Badiali@bmra.org or the president of the board Tom Napier at Tnapier@bmra.org.

If you would like to be included as a candidate, please complete this questionnaire.

All nominations should be submitted no later than March 21st, 2014.  The full roster of candidates will be made available at the BMRA Annual Member’s Meeting, with voting to take place in the days following the meeting.

via Board of Directors – Call for Nominations | Building Materials Reuse Association.