Tag Archives: Connecticut

Rustic home made from reclaimed barn timber wants $750K – Curbed

A home constructed from vintage barn timbers is on the market in Roxbury, Connecticut. The reclaimed farmhouse comes from carpenter Ed Cady, who in 1960 founded East Coast Barn Builders as a way to preserve English and Dutch Style barns in the United States.

Source: Rustic home made from reclaimed barn timber wants $750K – Curbed

The Day – ‘The biggest boat in town’ – News from southeastern Connecticut

Jim and Cathy Barnard on the deck of the bow area of their steamship-styled house overlooking the Niantic River on Saturday, March 10, 2018.  (Dana Jensen/The Day)

Jim and Cathy Barnard on the deck of the bow area of their steamship-styled house overlooking the Niantic River on Saturday, March 10, 2018. (Dana Jensen/The Day)

“Jim was great to work with. I had a lot of creative leeway,” Laschever said. He added that Barnard “kept bringing me architectural salvage” items, including stained-glass windows, a bathtub and a urinal for the bathroom, and a backlit antique elevator dial that reminded Barnard of mob-era Chicago.

Source: The Day – ‘The biggest boat in town’ – News from southeastern Connecticut

Wanted: New use for old mill building on Connecticut River in Montague | masslive.com

ramsey.JPGWalter Ramsey, Montague town planner, said the town is looking for a buyer and developer of Building 11, part of a mill complex on the Connecticut River in the Turners Falls village. (Photo by / Cori Urban )

“Building 11” is a free-standing, seven-story brick building on about fourth-tenths of an acre between the Connecticut River and the power canal in the Montague village of Turners Falls. The 35,280-square-foot brick mill building constructed about 1900 is being offered under the town’s Commercial Homesteading Program for a nominal fee to the builder/developer making the best proposal based on well-defined criteria contained in the request for proposals.

via Wanted: New use for old mill building on Connecticut River in Montague | masslive.com.

Program focuses on revitalizing historically significant structures around state | Monroe Courier

“Our combined initiatives to preserve and reuse our historic industrial sites reflect our growing understanding that Connecticut’s identity is encompassed in its industrial past not just its iconic town green,” said Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation Executive Director Helen Higgins. “Creative and feasible re-use of industrial buildings will transform our state and infuse economic vitality in our towns and cities.”

via Program focuses on revitalizing historically significant structures around state | Monroe Courier.

B:Hive Co-Working Space Features Upcycled Barn Wood Conference Tables and Thrifted Decor | Inhabitat – Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building

“We wanted to create something that couldn’t be replicated,” explains Madeline Rhodes about the array of edgy thrifted furniture and upcycled barn wood tabletops. Rhodes, a master thrifter and trained visual merchandiser, didn’t have a big budget to work with but wanted to make sure that everyone that walked through the doors felt at home, comfortable and energized by the creative environment. Private conference calls can be placed inside of the makeshift phone booths, and vintage clothing can be purchased in between coffee breaks.

via B:Hive Co-Working Space Features Upcycled Barn Wood Conference Tables and Thrifted Decor | Inhabitat – Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building.

Wood waste being buried, not turned to energy, at Augusta landfill | The Morning Sentinel, Waterville, ME

Construction and demolition debris wood that once helped make energy is, instead, taking up space in the landfill, where it will lie, indefinitely, until it decomposes.

“We suspended using that material, which, unfortunately, has caused some hardship to us and our suppliers,” said Sarah Boggess, a spokesperson for New York-based ReEnergy Holdings. “We’re hoping circumstances will change.”

The plants stopped using demolition debris wood because of the June 5 enactment of changes to rules in Connecticut on renewable energy credits, according to Boggess and Greg Leahey, senior vice president of asset management for ReEnergy.

The changes, she said, mean energy produced with construction and demolition wood no longer qualifies for class 1 renewable energy credits. The firm had been selling renewable energy credits generated by its operations in Maine in the Connecticut renewable energy credits market.

ReEnergy’s Maine plants still are operating, but now they make electricity using only “green” biomass, such as brush and other forest material, which is still eligible for renewable energy credits.

via Wood waste being buried, not turned to energy, at Augusta landfill | The Morning Sentinel, Waterville, ME.