Tag Archives: designing for deconstruction

Recycled Buildings or Bridges? Designing for Deconstruction Beyond Adaptive Reuse

Disassembly of the Bay Bridge’s eastern span. Courtesy Sam Burbank.

This is the world architect and building scientist Bradley Guy—assistant professor of sustainable design at The Catholic University of America School of Architecture and Planning, as well as author of Unbuilding: Salvaging the Architectural Treasures of Unwanted Houses—has been slowly, arduously advocating for since the mid-1990s, when he was introduced to the idea of designing for deconstruction. Design for deconstruction (or disassembly, sometimes abbreviated DfD) is a design philosophy and set of strategies that acknowledge that the vast majority of buildings have a life span.

via Recycled Buildings or Bridges? Designing for Deconstruction Beyond Adaptive Reuse.

Design for Deconstruction: Architects should Plan for Less Waste | Moss Architecture

What moss and other designers could give a lot more more thought to, is designing for ways attach materials in a removable way.  Here are a few examples: screw on metal finish panels as opposed to tile cemented so a surface; screws in general vs nails;  no glue.  Using whole slab material  for counter tops means that it can be cut down to size to fit a second or third application.

This idea of dis-assembly or deconstruction can even be applied to structure.  A timber frame and brick building can potentially be broken down into its component pieces again.  A 2×4 or “stick frame” one likely can’t.  Building with more durable discrete “elements” increases the odds that those components can stay out of the trash, long term.

via Design for Deconstruction: Architects should Plan for Less Waste | Moss Architecture.