Tag Archives: historic buildings

Heritage group can have ‘whatever it wants’ from doomed buildings | CBC News

PMV Canada says it will demolish these vacant buildings at 120 and 126 Main Street over the next two weeks. (Google Inc.)

“We could repurpose some of those materials, not see them end up in landfills like other demolitions,” said Janelle Russell, Heritage Saint John’s vice-president.”There’s, of course, the front trim, there’s staircases, banisters. … A lot of the buildings in this area are made out of virgin wood, so they’re very strong, and the wood is still good and solid.

Source: Heritage group can have ‘whatever it wants’ from doomed buildings | CBC News

Adaptive Reuse Projects Provide Substantial Returns – D Magazine

“The conversion of a property from industrial or retail use to creative office has become an increasingly popular value-add strategy for investors,” Transwestern’s Michael Soto, director of research in Southern California and co-author of the report, said in a statement. “Two trends are fueling demand for this type of differentiated office product: One, technology, advertising, media and other companies trying to attract millennials are interested in the characteristic features of creative office space—open floor plans, natural lighting, common spaces and amenities such as cafés and rec rooms. And two, tenants are returning to cities, where they can take advantage of live/work/play environments.”

Source: Adaptive Reuse Projects Provide Substantial Returns – D Magazine

Houston developers talk historic renovations in Heights, Washington, Sugar Land – Houston Business Journal

Unsurprisingly, Houston’s most popular areas for adaptive reuse projects – East Downtown, the Heights, Midtown – also contain a majority of the city’s historic buildings. Houston’s Baker Katz and Braun Enterprises recently scooped up a historic 17,000-square-foot building at 1919 Washington Ave.

Source: Houston developers talk historic renovations in Heights, Washington, Sugar Land – Houston Business Journal

New state program could help save North Jersey’s historical buildings – NJ State News – NorthJersey.com

“The millennial generation is rejecting the cookie-cutter suburbia of manicured lawns and McMansions and are going for things that are more quirky,” said Tim Adriance, past president of the Bergen County Historical Society. “They are looking for something more solid with history that has connection to something.”

Source: New state program could help save North Jersey’s historical buildings – NJ State News – NorthJersey.com

National Parks Service unveils plans to revamp historic buildings around the HMAS Watson navy base | DailyTelegraph

Historic buildings at Watsons Bay could be turned into wedding and function venues.

Under the plan, Gap Bluff Hospitality would transform historic buildings such as the Constables Cottage, Officers Mess and the Armoury into swanky all-purpose venues.

via National Parks Service unveils plans to revamp historic buildings around the HMAS Watson navy base | DailyTelegraph.

Portland must do more to preserve old houses: Guest opinion | OregonLive.com

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A group of neighborhood residents recently saved Northwest Portland’s Goldsmith House from demolition. ( James Reddick/The Oregonian)

According to The Architectural Heritage Center, an estimated 389 demolitions took place in 2013 in neighborhoods across the city; it’s rumored that a demo per work day is happening in 2014. They have some ideas as places to start responding to the demolition epidemic:

(1) Require advance notice to surrounding property owners and residents. Right now, notice is only required by the city when more than one new house is proposed. There’s no notice/delay when a demo application and the replacement house permit are filed the same day. The city should require notice, and time for response, across the board.

(2) Change the definition of “demolition” in the city’s development code – a big problem is that any demolition that leaves any portion of a house still standing (such as a partial foundation wall) is called an “alteration” or “remodel,” not a demolition (which are seriously under-counted, as a result.) More typically, many other jurisdictions use “at least 50% of a structure remains standing” as the primary criterion for an alteration/remodel. If that’s reasonable enough for other cities and counties, it should be acceptable for Portland.

(3) Houses that are obviously historic (but unprotected) are those that have long been listed on the city’s 1983 Historic Resources Inventory, but many houses have reached the age of 50-plus since then. We propose a mandatory 120 day delay for houses on the HRI or at least 50-plus years old. These are likely the ones that need time for investigating alternatives to demolition.

(4) Require that existing front and side yard setbacks be maintained for the new house(s). One major concern is that after a demolition, a new house is not only usually bigger, but it covers much more of the lot, often changing the streetscape substantially. If the front- and side-yard setbacks stay the same for the new house, the streetscape remains more like its traditional neighbors.

via Portland must do more to preserve old houses: Guest opinion | OregonLive.com.