Tag Archives: Iowa

Derelict Building Grant applications due April 4 | News | communitynewspapergroup.com

The grant program was instituted by state legislation to help rural communities with populations of 5,000 or less to deconstruct or renovate abandoned commercial and public structures.

The program emphasizes reuse and recycling of building items, helps improve street appearance and commercial development, and alleviates the environmental concern these buildings can pose. Financial assistance includes asbestos removal, building deconstruction and renovation, and other environmental services.

Source: Derelict Building Grant applications due April 4 | News | communitynewspapergroup.com

4 Millwork District buildings in Dubuque represent rebirth – THonline.com: Tri-state News

4 Millwork District buildings in Dubuque represent rebirth

By the mid- to late 20th century, it saw businesses close or leave town until most of what was left was empty warehouses.

Then, in the early 2000s, a revitalization of the Warehouse District began. It gained traction in 2005, when there was a major art exhibit in one of the warehouses.

via 4 Millwork District buildings in Dubuque represent rebirth – THonline.com: Tri-state News.

Iowa Derelict Building Program

The Derelict Building Program was established to provide small Iowa communities and rural counties financial assistance to address neglected structures in order to improve the appearance of their streets and revitalize local economies.  In accordance with the statutory requirement on how these funds are to be used the emphasis will be on landfill diversion through the recycling and reuse of building materials.

via Derelict Building Program.

Nonprofit groups salvage materials from Genesis homes

100714-house-harvest-03Mel Rullman, left, and Don Ague, volunteers with Habitat ReStore, remove nails from oak trim Tuesday outside a home at 2227 Esplanade Ave., Davenport. ReStore sells new and gently used building materials to raise money for Habitat for Humanity-Quad-Cities. Other items the group salvaged from the house and others in the area that are scheduled for demolition include toilets, a bathroom vanity and window wells.

The wood will be resold in the group’s Architectural Rescue Shop that raises money for neighborhood projects by salvaging, accepting and selling vintage items.

via Nonprofit groups salvage materials from Genesis homes.

DNR derelict building program grants announced » News in brief » The Ottumwa Courier

DES MOINES — The DNR Derelict Building Grant Program will award grants to 20 small, rural Iowa communities to help deconstruct or renovate abandoned structures and limit construction and demolition materials going to the landfill.

via DNR derelict building program grants announced » News in brief » The Ottumwa Courier.

Audubon School salvage brings thousands to charity | WQAD.com

Habitat ReStore

They were able to salvage items from Rock Island’s former Audubon School before it gets torn down in coming weeks.  The vacant school building is being demolished, and the land it currently stands on is being sold.

As of Friday, November 15, 2013,  the organization has made an estimated $17,000 from selling those items.

via Audubon School salvage brings thousands to charity | WQAD.com.

Rethinking Demolition Seminar

Learn what it takes to make deconstruction projects successful for your business, community or property. COSC invites you to an engaging introductory training with national deconstruction consultant David Bennick and panel discussion with local resource experts on the economical, social and environmental benefits of minimizing construction and demolition debris.

Organized by Center on Sustainable Communities (COSC) and its Iowa Deconstruction & Reuse Initiative.

 

Date/Time

Friday, October 18

8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Location

Metro Waste Authority

300 E Locust St #100, Des Moines, IA

Registration

$65 COSC Members | $80 Non-members

Register here or email us at info@icosc.com.

via Rethinking Demolition Seminar.

‘West End Salvage’ to debut on HGTV | The Des Moines Register | desmoinesregister.com

Each episode of the reality show follows owner Don Short and his crew renovating a room for central Iowa homeowners, using architectural and vintage finds. But it will also show the inner workings of the store, from carpenters creating custom goods in the basement to the pickers who deliver salvaged treasures to the store’s doorstep.

via ‘West End Salvage’ to debut on HGTV | The Des Moines Register | desmoinesregister.com.

Vintage building materials company moving to larger Two Harbors site | Duluth News Tribune | Duluth, Minnesota

“For a business to succeed and really start creating some growth activity, the time had come to do that,” McCarthy said. “Over the last 10 years, it boiled down to: Is this going to be a hobby or a business? My wife and I decided this is time to give it a good push.”

Architectural items and materials will fill the building’s first floor, with room to better display them. But the couple also have plans for the second floor. An art gallery upstairs will feature artists’ booths. So far, about six artists have signed on. A center for crafting workshops and retreats also is eventually planned for the second floor. McCarthy’s wife, Christine, a crafter herself, is behind that effort.

As for the public’s interest in the items he sells, McCarthy is confident that won’t diminish.

“Interest has grown very significantly,” he said. “We’re seeing a lot of uptick in do-it-yourselfers. They want to find something other than what you can get at a big box store, like unique light and bathroom fixtures. We’re also seeing a growing repurposing crowd who turn doors into furniture, windows into stained glass windows. We’re a resource for people.”

via Vintage building materials company moving to larger Two Harbors site | Duluth News Tribune | Duluth, Minnesota.

Iowa: DNR Derelict Building Grant Program Awards Grants to 19 Rural Communities – Fire Engineering

Iowa Department of Natural Resources

Department of Natural Resources, The State of Iowa has issued the following news release:

The DNR Derelict Building Grant Program will award grants to 19 small, rural Iowa communities to help deconstruct or renovate abandoned structures and limit construction and demolition materials going to the landfill.

The DNR Derelict Building Grant Program was instituted by statute to help rural communities with populations of 5,000 or less. DBGP funding is awarded annually on a competitive basis with cash matches required. Applications for the next funding round will be due in spring 2014.

The following projects will receive a total of $491,000 as reimbursement grants:

City of Buffalo — $11,341 to deconstruct a building and create a green space that will be accessible from the Mississippi River Trail bike path that will be constructed through town and connect the towns of Davenport and Muscatine.

City of Collins — $16,000 to be split between two projects. One project will complete an asbestos inspection at a abandoned commercial building and the other project will abate asbestos and deconstruct the old fire station. A new building to house the fire department will be built to replace the deconstructed building.

City of Early — $45,000 to have asbestos removed, a phase I/II assessment to be completed and full deconstruction of the Payless Cashway building that was damaged by a tornado. The city is partnering with the local economic development office to market the site for commercial interests.

City of Emmetsburg — $3,750 to complete asbestos inspections at 25 designated buildings that the city has secured easements with the building owners. This is part of an even larger project to improve the look of the downtown area.

City of Garnavillo — $50,000 to deconstruct the old school building and construct a new city hall in its place.

City of Malvern — $80,000 to partner with the Malvern Area Betterment Association to use funds to complete asbestos inspection, abatement, structural analysis and building renovation, which will offer commercial and residential space.

City of Marcus — $11,796 to deconstruct one building and renovate two others. Once deconstructed, the building site will become a green space which will house a container to collect recyclables. The two renovated buildings will be transformed into storage for community cardboard collection which will also be recycled.

City of Middletown — $1,500 to start toward deconstructing the old school building. This round of funding will be used to complete an asbestos inspection for the premises. The city plans on submitting an application for the next grant round to continue the project.

City of Olin — $34,000 to partner with Olin Economic Development on designated renovation tasks that will include inspecting and abating asbestos, and replacing the roof and exterior facades. The building will be marketed for commercial interest.

City of Rockford — $35,500 to inspect for and abate asbestos and deconstruct an abandoned commercial building, allowing a neighboring business to expand its operation.

City of Ruthven — $23,000 to deconstruct two buildings in disrepair. Once complete, the city plans on marketing the vacated spaces to interested commercial clients.

City of Sioux Rapids — $12,585 to deconstruct a former meat locker that poses a health and safety hazard to the community. The site will then be marketed for commercial purposes.

City of Slater — $66,140 to abate for asbestos and renovate an abandoned building located on Main Street. The project will repair and weatherproof the building shell and prepare the building for sale to a commercial interest.

City of Van Meter — $17,187 to remove all asbestos and deconstruct a building that is posing a health and safety hazard to the community. Building will be replaced with a new city services building that will house the police station, city hall staff and library.

City of Zearing — $80,000 to complete structural analysis, asbestos inspection, abatement and renovation activities for three separate buildings. Once complete, a neighboring business intends to create a restaurant and bar in the place of two of these projects, while the other site will be marketed for commercial interests.

Louisa County — $3,400 to start renovations on the old jail, transforming it into an office building that will house county staff. The funding for this grant will cover an asbestos inspection and structural engineering analysis.

For further information please visit: http://www.iowadnr.gov

via Iowa: DNR Derelict Building Grant Program Awards Grants to 19 Rural Communities – Fire Engineering.

Grain Silo in Iowa Converted into a Large Ice Climbing Wall | Inhabitat – Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building

On Inhabitat today – Grain Silo adaptive reuse. That is some cool digs!

converted ice climbing wall, grain silo ice climbing, ice climbing, Iowa ice climbing, Don Briggs climbing wall, University of Northern Iowa, winter sports

There aren’t too many places to go ice climbing in the corn fields of Iowa, so avid climbers in the area have to get a little bit creative. Local climber Don Briggs took a staple of the landscape — a grain silo — and converted it into an ice climbing wall. The eight-story structure is covered with ice curtains that run along a large wall and opens every winter, provided that the temperatures are consistently below 26 degrees. The silo, which is located just outside Cedar Falls, Iowa, has become a climbing mecca in the middle of the Great Plains.

converted ice climbing wall, grain silo ice climbing, ice climbing, Iowa ice climbing, Don Briggs climbing wall, University of Northern Iowa, winter sports

via Grain Silo in Iowa Converted into a Large Ice Climbing Wall | Inhabitat – Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building.

REC Info Center: Home Building & Remodeling: Deconstruction and reuse

Dan Oswald, instructor in the Deconstruction and Retrofit program at Iowa Central Community College (ICCC), has been training students for the deconstruction industry since ICCC received a grant to begin the program in 2010.

Two years into the program, Dan discusses the progress being made in instruction and in the industry in Iowa.

Q: What is “deconstruction”?
A: Deconstruction is defined as “the process of systematically removing a building or structure by taking it apart in the reverse order of construction (with a goal of maximizing reuse and recycling).”

The last part of that definition is worth taking a second look at: deconstruction’s goal is to “maximize reuse and recycling.” In other words, the goal is to keep as much of the deconstructed materials from going to the landfill. Many components—old-growth lumber, copper, and more—are valuable and can be reused in other ways.

Q: Is it possible to salvage many of the old materials?
A: That is both the opportunity and the challenge of deconstruction. Since I’m training building/construction professionals in this field, the question I get most often is, “I like the idea, but does it pay?” The short answer to that question is, yes it can … but it depends.

Until there is a more robust network of Iowans using the deconstructed materials, it is a little tricky to get rid of materials for a price that can ensure profitability. That doesn’t mean we should give up however; in fact, Iowa might be considered a perfect location for deconstruction projects.

Q: Why is Iowa a perfect location for deconstruction projects?
A: Nearly half of houses in Iowa are considered dilapidated. In addition, think about how many small town main streets have blocks of buildings that are vacant and falling down, or are still occupied but in poor repair? What about all the barns, hog houses, chicken houses, and other agriculture-related buildings on our farms? Many of these buildings were built between the late 1800s to the 1930s and 1940s and are in need of repair or replacement.

Continue reading REC Info Center: Home Building & Remodeling: Deconstruction and reuse