Tag Archives: job creation

Can Bauman and Kovac Create Jobs? » Urban Milwaukee

City owned home at 2817-19 North 22nd Street. Photo from the City of Milwaukee.

The ordinance will kick in whenever the city is set to demolish a structure or a private contractor seeks a permit to demolish. And there are exceptions to the mandate to deconstruct if there are safety considerations or the salvageable materials have been damaged by something like a fire. While Bauman and Kovac are both historic preservation hawks in Milwaukee, because demolition and deconstruction jobs employ individuals from underserved communities in the city Bauman said “I do see this primarily as a job creation tool.”

Source: Can Bauman and Kovac Create Jobs? » Urban Milwaukee

Black Men In Chicago Are Taking Over Abandoned Property & Rebuilding The Neighborhood With The Youth By Creating Their Own Jobs – Better News

 

The spokesperson Mark Carter said NHS, CIC and Globe Trotters organizations were supposed to help their parents and grandparents but instead they allowed the city to demolish their homes.

Source: Black Men In Chicago Are Taking Over Abandoned Property & Rebuilding The Neighborhood With The Youth By Creating Their Own Jobs – Better News

Fairmont BAD Buildings Part 3: Utilizing Deconstruction – WBOY.com

“If we’re going to continue just to take a big building with a big machine, smash it down, that’s a two man job,” Jecker said. “That’s it. We can take a four or five man crew, put those people to work and recycle this material.”   Jecker employed an autistic teen years ago through his business Jecker’s wreckers. He said this is the perfect industry to give disabled residents a chance at work. “To be able to teach them how to pull a nail is pretty simple,” Jecker said. We need to create jobs. Deconstruction will create a lot of jobs.”

Source: Fairmont BAD Buildings Part 3: Utilizing Deconstruction – WBOY.com: Clarksburg, Morgantown: News, Sports, Weather

DETAILS team as “Innovator of the Year” – Humanim

Details, a unique approach...

Big News! The Daily Record has named Humanim’s Jeff Carroll and the DETAILS team as “Innovator of the Year.”

DETAILS, a Humanim social enterprise, is a nonprofit deconstruction business with a social mission: creating jobs for people who, for many reasons, have faced difficulty getting hired. We train and hire men and women to take apart buildings – rather than demolishing them – and then we salvage the materials for resale, reuse or repurposing.

detailsIOTY

via Humanim – Home.

Avondale’s Pride Center building razed | The Cincinnati Herald | Established in 1955 | Cincinnati, Ohio

<p>Signs on the building at Forest and Burnet are removed prior to demolition.</p>

Advanced Community Enhancement, the building owner, partnered with Building Value (a local nonprofit building materials reuse center, deconstruction service and job training business of Easter Seals TriState), Rumpke Recycling, and the Uptown Consortium in the demolition of the 12,000-square-foot building in what was billed as an environmental event in that 90 percent of the building’s materials will be recycled. The Uptown Consortium and Sperry Van Ness-RICORE Investment Management coordinated the project the corner of Forest and Burnet avenues.

In addition to diverting the waste from the landfill, the project provides transitional employment opportunities through Building Value’s job training deconstruction program. The Building Value crew positions act as a bridge to move people with workforce disadvantages into careers in construction.

via Avondale’s Pride Center building razed | The Cincinnati Herald | Established in 1955 | Cincinnati, Ohio.

Green demolition can create jobs for those in need | Star Tribune

Photo: Jay Young, The Evansville Courier & Press via Associated Press

Deconstruction is new to the Twin Cities, and one Minneapolis social enterprise called Better Futures Minnesota is leading the charge. It offers work crews for hire to provide deconstruction services, property maintenance, appliance recycling, groundskeeping and more. But off the clock, the men who work at Better Futures also get help with housing, healing and recovery, and personal coaching — helping these formerly incarcerated or homeless men turn their lives around.

A demolition boom is upon us, and we have a choice as a community. Demolish and send it to the dump, or deconstruct for less money, less waste and more green jobs.

via Green demolition can create jobs for those in need | Star Tribune.

Firm dismantles buildings, recycles materials | Post-Crescent Media | postcrescent.com

Hutson, Creamer, Brueggeman

Used Anew owner Larry Hutson (on ladder), Justin Creamer and Brian Brueggeman work to deconstruct a barn near Mindoro on Monday. The barn’s materials will be salvaged and sold to builders, furniture makers or crafters instead of going to a landfill. / Erik Daily/Associated Press

The DVR this year secured more than 3,000 successful employment opportunities, and the agency hired 20 business consultants throughout Wisconsin to connect employers with what Studden called an “untapped” candidate base.

“It’s all about making the right connection,” she said. “It’s about finding one of our consumers (or two consumers, in this case) who can meet the needs of the employer.”

It’s a resource Hutson said he would recommend to other business owners without hesitation.

“It’s a wonderful opportunity,” Hutson said. “It gives these folks a chance to feel useful and valuable, and from an employers’ standpoint, these guys are a perfect fit — they work really hard, they have good attitudes and a good sense of humor.”

Since its launch in May, Used Anew has taken down several farm outbuildings, an outdoor summer kitchen, a two-story farmhouse and is in the process of deconstructing a barn.

via Firm dismantles buildings, recycles materials | Post-Crescent Media | postcrescent.com.

Blighted East Baltimore land to become urban farm – Baltimore Business Journal

The property includes several pumping stations that used to provide water to the city. Those historic structures will be renovated to include a commercial kitchen that will serve as a food incubator for small businesses, including caterers. Land surrounding those buildings will include portable greenhouses known as “hoop houses” along the train tracks running alongside the parcel.

The site at 1801 E Oliver St. is slated to become an urban farm.

Partnerships are planned with Woodberry Kitchen, a restaurant that is seeking local produce for its menu offerings, and the nonprofit Humanim, which is planning a community kitchen on the site.

Devan said the project will create 100 construction jobs and eventually 100 permanent jobs.

BDC President Brenda McKenzie said the project will also be beneficial to the city and the neighborhood by providing access to healthy foods through a farmers market planned for the site.

“It’s also important in terms of reactivating that part of East Baltimore,” McKenzie said. “There’s been a lot of research done that shows foodie culture is another way for people to look at the city differently.”

via Blighted East Baltimore land to become urban farm – Baltimore Business Journal.