Tag Archives: New Jersey

Inside Ironside: How a Former Newark Warehouse is Being Brought Back to Life | Jersey Digs

Ironside Newark Construction Progress Exterior

Ironside Newark exterior. Photo by Jared Kofsky/Jersey Digs.

“Given the historic nature of the building and the prior uses in the building, we quickly recognized that the bones were irreplaceable and therefore repurposing it for its intended use as loft-style office with street-level retail would be a great second life if you will for the building,” Sommer explained, adding that “we’re seeing a tremendous amount of velocity on both fronts.”

Source: Inside Ironside: How a Former Newark Warehouse is Being Brought Back to Life | Jersey Digs

Planning Board denies yet another proposal to reuse West Side firehouse | WBFO

MIKE DESMOND / WBFO NEWS

“I’m not a developer. I don’t understand the machinery, the political machinery, to become a developer and make something else out of it,” said Blochoe. “Five previous owners have failed in doing something to this place, if my count is not mistaken, and I have no other plans.”

Source: Planning Board denies yet another proposal to reuse West Side firehouse | WBFO

Here are N.J.’s 10 most endangered historic sites for 2018 | NJ.com

The Captain William Tyson House is owned by the Township of Rochelle Park which wants to either sell or raze the structure, officials say.

Photo Provided | Preservation New Jersey

“Several challenges face properties on this year’s endangered sites list, including neglect and deferred maintenance, threats incurred by redevelopment and new construction, difficulties raising adequate historic preservation funding, the need for creative adaptive reuse proposals, inadequate recognition and protection by government agencies, and political influences,” said Courtenay D. Mercer, president of PNJ.

Source: Here are N.J.’s 10 most endangered historic sites for 2018 | NJ.com

Fogarty Finger creates home in New Jersey propeller factory

Paulus Hook Residence by Fogarty Finger

“The architectural design aimed to convert the historic propeller-pattern factory into a modern home, while also restoring the classic details,” said a statement from Fogarty Finger.

 “The architects preserved the original wood joists, wood columns, concrete floors and machinery from the building’s industrial past and incorporated them into the main living space,” said the statement.

Source: Fogarty Finger creates home in New Jersey propeller factory

Cape May man dumpster dives for his wooden art | Living | pressofatlanticcity.com

Peter Henderer is a Cape May artist who takes his wood from homes and dumpsters to make his art at his studio Thursday Dec 14, 2017. (The Press of Atlantic City / Edward Lea Staff Photographer)

For some pieces, he’ll use shovels for fish bills, rakes for fins and light bulbs for eyes. All of the work is done in a shed in the backyard of his grandparents’ Cape May home, where Henderer will cut, sand and stain plywood before coating it with polyurethane to withstand any climate.

Source: Cape May man dumpster dives for his wooden art | Living | pressofatlanticcity.com

Artist builds incredible stained-glass cabin in the middle of the woods | Inhabitat 

Neile Cooper, Mohawk, New Jersey

The tiny retreat is made almost entirely from repurposed window frames and lumber, and its handcrafted stained glass panels depict flowers, birds, butterflies, and other nature-inspired scenes.

Neile Cooper, Mohawk, New Jersey

Source: Artist builds incredible stained-glass cabin in the middle of the woods | Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Adaptive Reuse Project Will Transform Historic Newark Factory Into Residences | Jersey Digs

 

Madeline Ruiz-Robinson and Dave Robinson of SUAD Studio for Urban Architecture & Design are the project’s architect. They applied in February to add a new four-story addition to the building within the courtyard, and to keep one of the courtyard structures previously slated to be demolished as part of the project. The proposal was approved with conditions in March by the Newark Landmarks and Historic Preservation Commission. In addition, new insulated windows will replicate the existing style and material of the original units, according to commission records.

Source: Adaptive Reuse Project Will Transform Historic Newark Factory Into Residences | Jersey Digs

From fuel to food: adaptive reuse converts a closed gas station in Princeton, N.J., to a Nomad pizza | Building Design + Construction

The gas station’s original design (above) harkens back to the Modernist movement of the 1930s. Its adaptive reuse as a pizzeria (below) required closing the service bays and garage doors in the rear with a facade of cedar and storefront glazing. Images: Michael Slack, courtesy of JZA+D

Source: From fuel to food: adaptive reuse converts a closed gas station in Princeton, N.J., to a Nomad pizza | Building Design + Construction

New state program could help save North Jersey’s historical buildings – NJ State News – NorthJersey.com

“The millennial generation is rejecting the cookie-cutter suburbia of manicured lawns and McMansions and are going for things that are more quirky,” said Tim Adriance, past president of the Bergen County Historical Society. “They are looking for something more solid with history that has connection to something.”

Source: New state program could help save North Jersey’s historical buildings – NJ State News – NorthJersey.com

Once Blighted Trenton Lot Goes From Eyesore to Urban Oasis | Town Topics

FROM URBAN BLIGHT TO FARM: Planting is ongoing at Trenton’s Capital City Farm, a joint effort of several non-profit groups that has turned a trash-strewn lot into a verdant space designed to provide fresh produce and more to the local community and beyond.

While Capital City Farm is only in its first season, there are signs that it is having the desired effect. “People are curious,” Ms. Mead said, “especially those who come to the Soup Kitchen. Some teenagers from the neighborhood are excited about working on the farm. People are stopping by. It’s been an interesting thing to watch.”

Source: Once Blighted Trenton Lot Goes From Eyesore to Urban Oasis | Town Topics

Want to live in a Victorian mansion? – Courier-Post

34 E. Centre Street in Woodbury was built in 1880 accordingThe Bonfiglio house on Newton Avenue is an 1893 Victorian, Wednesday, Dec. 9.  Sean M. Fitzgerald/Staff Photographer

The most satisfying discovery was the stained glass window on the second floor. The former owners covered it with plaster and a cabinet.

“That was fun to uncover and have the light come through for the first time in 70 years,” Shaw said.

The house is a “diamond in the rough,” he said.

“Buying something and being able to bring it back to its potential maybe will inspire other people to move into the area and takes those houses that have good bones, but need TLC,” Shaw explained.

Shaw and Bonfiglio rely on architectural salvage yards in Philadelphia and Woodbury Antiques — a Broad Street antiques mall — for pieces. Shaw pulled rounded top shutters for his exterior third-floor windows from the salvage yards. Bonfiglio found the shutters from The Dakota at the antique shop.

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Owner Brian Bonfiglio talks about renovation work he’s done inside his 1893 Victorian house. (Photo: Sean M. Fitzgerald/Staff Photo)

via Want to live in a Victorian mansion?.

Pre-Demolition work underway at Green Hotel | NJ.com

Green Hotel.JPGThe former Green Hotel, on Cooper Street in Woodbury, on Friday, April 24, 2015. (Staff photo by Jason Laday)

“The process has already begun, demolishing the building,” said Camden Diocese spokesman Peter Feuerherd on Friday.

The city planning and zoning board in August 2014 voted 6-1 to approve the demolition, over the protests of the members of Woodbury’s Historic Preservation Commission.

The building once known as the Green Castle Hotel, originally built in 1881 and turned into apartments in 1920, has been the subject of debate between Holy Angels Parish and preservation advocates for years.

via Pre-Demolition work underway at Green Hotel | NJ.com.

Glassboro, Rowan University officials unveil plans for High Street art gallery | NJ.com

Rowan University unveils development plans for the new Rowan University Art Gallery, Monday, Feb. 9, 2015. The building, located at 301 West High Street, will also feature smart classrooms, office space, a conference room, and student lounge areas. (Tim Hawk | South Jersey Times)

The building at 301 High St. in downtown Glassboro was once intended to hold several condominiums. As the years went by, however, the structure, built right around the 2008 economic downturn, sat empty.

For the first time on Monday, Glassboro and Rowan University officials opened the doors of the half-finished structure to unveil their plans for the space, which will serve as the home of Rowan’s art gallery in addition to offices and classrooms.

via Glassboro, Rowan University officials unveil plans for High Street art gallery | NJ.com.

RED BANK: GREEN SPACE RISES IN OLD CHURCH – Red Bank Green

211 broad 102114 2The underside of the church roof, above, will remain exposed to the new second floor and mezzanine. Below, the church’s steeple also will be retained.  (Photos by John T. Ward.)

“It’s like architectural sculpture,” developer Bob Silver, of Bravitas Group, said of the intricate lacing of timbers. “We never even considered taking it down.”

via RED BANK: GREEN SPACE RISES IN OLD CHURCH – Red Bank Green.

Woodbury approves demolition of Victorian-era Green Hotel | NJ.com

GREEN HOTEL JHW_5884.jpgThe former Green Hotel building at Cooper Street and Railroad Avenue, in Woodbury, Saturday, Aug. 16, 2014. (Staff Photo by Joe Warner/South Jersey Times)(JOE WARNER)

“History is and always has been important in this town. There are a lot of old buildings here,” he said after the vote. “To forget and let them go is a shame, and that’s what happened here. There’s been no investment.”

via Woodbury approves demolition of Victorian-era Green Hotel | NJ.com.

Landmark Woodbury theater revived as apartments

Woodbury unveils the restored GG Green Building, a 133-year-old structure that was considered for demolition just two years ago. Once a theater, developers have turned it into a mixed-use residential building in Woodbury. This is a photo of the building on December 11, 2013.  (ELIZABETH ROBERTSON/Staff Photographer)

Woodbury unveils the restored GG Green Building, a 133-year-old structure that was considered for demolition just two years ago. Once a theater, developers have turned it into a mixed-use residential building in Woodbury. This is a photo of the building on December 11, 2013. (ELIZABETH ROBERTSON/Staff Photographer)

via Landmark Woodbury theater revived as apartments.

Ditch the dumping – The Standard

“It’s good for the environment, and we believe it’s the right thing to do,” said Teicher, a principal with local construction company Build Within Reach.

Like Teicher, a growing number of builders, architects and homeowners are looking for ways to recycle building materials, even though it is generally easier and faster to just haul everything to a landfill.

The environmental benefits are obvious, since millions of tons of construction debris are dumped every year. But saving these old building elements can also make economic sense, because they can be resold, donated or reused to save the cost of buying new items.

To dismantle the house, Teicher hired a crew from a Baltimore non- profit, Humanim. Chris Posko, an operations manager for Humanim, said that 80 to 85 percent of a home can typically be saved.

“There’s value in everything,” Posko said. “To be able to get over 1,000 square feet of heart pine flooring [from the Englewood house] is beautiful.”

via Ditch the dumping – The Standard.

reclaimed LLC

[vimeo http://www.vimeo.com/55945575 w=400&h=300]

After college I returned to work in New Jersey and then I started framing my own photographs of my work with rare wildlife in New Jersey. Many were sold at fundraisers for the organization I work for: Conserve Wildlife Foundation of NJ. During this time I’ve begun to become quite the collector of salvaged wood. While at work or play I always keep my eye out for anything that I think could be re-purposed. I also collect wood to help reduce this type of materials out of the waste stream. Some estimates put construction and wood waste at 28% of the waste stream.

I’ve collected a bunch of salvaged wood throughout southern and coastal NJ. From old cedar fencing collected at Dennisville Fence to tongue and groove cedar that was salvaged from my friend’s house in Barnegat Light when he decided to remodel. I love working with salvaged wood because of it’s history and wear/tear. In some cases it can tell a story of its past use. I enjoy telling stories of where the wood came from and I think it adds to the value of the product by knowing who and where it came from!

 

 

via about | reclaimed LLC.

New Jerseyans salvage Hurricane Sandy debris to create new goods | NJ.com

The Tuckerton Creek overflowed into many of the buildings in the borough’s historic seaport during Hurricane Sandy, leaving the maritime museum with dumpsters full of debris to discard.

Ben Wurst works on cutting out an outline of New Jersey from wood he salvaged from debri left by Hurricane Sandy.

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Erin O’Neill/The Star-Ledger   But among the piles of trash, Ben Wurst spotted the opportunity to create something new.

Now flooring from the seaport is stacked among other piles of salvaged wood outside of Wurst’s home in the New Gretna section of Bass River Township. There, in a small woodshop in his backyard, Wurst turns old fences, floors and walls into frames, furniture and collectibles.

“At least I got some of it — as much as I could, there was tons of it — just to try and save some of it from going to the landfill,” Wurst — who owns reclaimed LLC — said about the flooring from the seaport.

Wurst has used that wood — as well as pieces of the building known as “The Shack” that sat along Route 72 heading into Long Beach Island and was destroyed during Sandy — to create cutouts of New Jersey that he sells online.

“We have a cool state to cut out, I think. Our whole state is defined by water pretty much if you look at it. You have the river, the bay and the ocean,” he said.

Wurst said he found the Shack debris after the storm and knew it belonged to the iconic structure because of the age of the wood. He donated 30 percent of the proceeds he made from sales in January to hurricane relief.

Renee Kennedy, who handles public relations for the Tuckerton Seaport, lauded Wurst for “just taking that wood and reclaiming it and doing something else with it.”

Wurst isn’t alone in his efforts.

Read the entire inspiring article via New Jerseyans salvage Hurricane Sandy debris to create new goods | NJ.com.

2 | Brooklyn-Made Furniture Built From Sandy’s Scraps | Co.Design: business + innovation + design

We are big, BIG fans of what Reclaim NYC is doing to raise money for Sandy survivors and to bring awareness to building material reuse and salvage.

Not to mention, that the state of New Jersey is very dear to us! Why not place a bid at the auction so we don’t have to take a bat to your knees s’okay?

Some might balk at the notion of owning a lamp made from debris Sandy left behind. But as New Jersey residents working to reuse the Atlantic City boardwalk have found, storm survivors can be passionate about preserving evidence of the destruction. The Reclaim NYC project is following a similar instinct, turning objects destroyed by the storm into ad hoc memorials. “It sounds like a cliché, but there’s a real sense of optimism in the design community here,” Chambard adds. “We all come to the table, we each have different voices, but it’s somehow very cohesive. It’s what I love about the city.”

The Après Collection will be on the auction block on December 19, alongside work from Dror Benshetrit and Lindsey Adelman. RSVP here.

via 2 | Brooklyn-Made Furniture Built From Sandy’s Scraps | Co.Design: business + innovation + design.

Hurricane Sandy Relief Orange painted by LittleShoreHouse on Etsy

Help support the rebuilding of the Jersey Shore!

Hurricane Sandy Relief - Orange painted starfish 12x12 - reclaimed wood from Sandy homes

Proceeds will go to the Monmouth Beach School, which was badly damaged in the storm and is closed indefinitely for repairs.

Our town of Monmouth Beach, NJ was hit hard by Hurricane Sandy, as were may of the other surrounding towns. As we looked at the piles of debris coming from many of our friends’ houses, we thought perhaps we could make something from the pieces of these damaged houses to raise money to help get our town back to the quaint little beach town so many love. So we went around town and started picking up pieces of wood quickly before they were hauled off.

Each 12″x12″ hand-painted wood wall hanging is made from wood collected from our friends and neighbors’ damaged houses (after asking their permission, of course). The wood we are collecting is lathing – strips of wood inside plaster walls. Many of the homes in our town were built in the early 1900’s. To know they will probably be replaced by drywall makes these boards even more special.

 

Hurricane Sandy Relief - Orange painted starfish 12x12 - reclaimed wood from Sandy homes

via Hurricane Sandy Relief Orange painted by LittleShoreHouse on Etsy.

For young farmers: No land, but plenty of climate change to go around | Grist

http://vimeo.com/41302992

At a gathering of Central Jersey organic farmers recently — it was a potluck — I listened in on a conversation between two of the veteran farmers in the room. They weren’t exactly elderly; they just weren’t in their 20s like almost everyone else in attendance. The two farmers discussed how a decade ago, the same potluck would have been a quiet, sparsely populated affair. Tonight the room was alive.

It won’t stay that way unless we find those youngsters some well-drained Garden State farmland to call their own. I suspect it’s the same story all across this nation.

Read the entire article via For young farmers: No land, but plenty of climate change to go around | Grist.