Tag Archives: recycled wood

Mexican winery built from recycled wood and rammed earth blends into the valley landscape | Inhabitat 

Related: Rammed earth house blends traditional materials with modern techniques in Vietnam’s last frontier

Recycled wood and steel are the primary materials used to construct the winery. The timber slats are naturally weathered and are of varying shades to give the building an interesting and earthy texture and parts of the wooden walls are punctuated by small glass openings for beautiful effect. Pieces of natural unmilled wood are used as seating or decorative objects.

Despite its 22,000-square-meter size, the BRUMA winery visually disappears in the dusty red and green landscape of Valle de Guadalupe.

Source: Mexican winery built from recycled wood and rammed earth blends into the valley landscape | Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Philippine Craftsman Renews Recycled Wood – The Jakarta Globe

Recycled WoodBenji Reyes uses recycled wood to create new designs. (Photo courtesy of Benji Reyes)

“I only use recycled wood for all my projects,” he explained. “I adhere to the principle of ‘build it once, build it right.’ To be able to produce a successful design, the piece has to pass three strict design rules, namely aesthetics, function and structural soundness.”

Reyes added that being observant was another crucial factor when it comes to designing.

“Watching and analyzing how people sit, slouch, or just laze around on chairs and benches can be incorporated in a design that eventually accommodates and supports the end function of a piece,” he said.

Another factor that always weighs into his work is his cultural heritage. All his pieces, for example, have Tagalog names.

“To be proud of one’s heritage develops one to create an unmistakable piece that not only translates to exhibit his skills but disseminates culturally the artist’s and the piece’s origins,” Reyes said.

But it is not only in his home country that Reyes has made a name for himself.

The work he has done on his own house was recently featured in The New York Times.

“ Tahanan [his home] is a testament to the beauty of Philippine woods,” Reyes said. “Not a single tree fell during its construction. The entire house was built of reclaimed wood from demolished houses and bridges.”

via Philippine Craftsman Renews Recycled Wood – The Jakarta Globe.

Robe Hook / Towel Hook Bath Decor in Reclaimed by andrewsreclaimed on Etsy

Robe Hook / Towel Hook Bath Decor in Reclaimed Wood

Attractive and sturdy two-robe hook made from recycled wood. We take layers of cabinet shop wood waste, cut, align and glue to reclaimed cedar before resawing and finishing, for a unique modern style that varies from piece to piece. The large 5/8″ wide aluminum pegs are handmade as well, brush-finished by sanding and permanently set deeply in the angled holes.

Each towel hook will have a different pattern and color, and will be finished with a light durable washable clear finish. We have cut two deep keyhole slots in the back, for mounting on a door or wall with anchors or screws as appropriate.

This two-peg hook is a good length for small entry-ways, narrow walls, and door installation. We use one here for the bath, and one for the entry door for a coat and hat.

Robe Hook / Towel Hook Bath Decor in Reclaimed Wood

via Robe Hook / Towel Hook Bath Decor in Reclaimed by andrewsreclaimed.

Fantastic Deconstructed Geodesic Dome Is Built With Local and Recycled Wood : TreeHugger

We’re used to seeing the geodesic dome as a full-formed structure. But for this year’s “People’s Meeting” on the future of housing, held in Bornholm, Denmark, Danish architects Kristoffer Tejlgaard and Benny Jepsen decided to create an unusual-looking venue for the event — a deconstructed, geodesic dome using locally-sourced and recycled wood.

via Fantastic Deconstructed Geodesic Dome Is Built With Local and Recycled Wood : TreeHugger.

Keep that old wood out of the landfill! – Hooray Hanes Vintage & Salvage!

We love what you do Hanes! ~RA

Via Hanes Vintage & Salvage:

I love this article from the Guardian, Recycled wood: the green key to a sustainable built environment,  via The Reclamation Administration, about how much old wood goes into landfills each year. It’s absolutely tragic.

The remodelling and demolishing of homes in the US results in the equivalent of 250,000 single-family homes being interred in landfills or incinerated each year. Among the dry wall, plastic and concrete that are disposed of is lumber sourced from Americas forests. Within this lumber, there is also wood from older homes. This is especially valuable because it is of higher quality than material used in most new construction projects.

Wood in homes built 50 years ago or earlier was often sourced from first-growth forests. Whether a small, older home being destroyed for a larger, more modern home, or a historic beach-front house being targeted for removal and upgrade by a presidential candidate, these houses are a treasure trove of sturdy wood that builders should reclaim. Entrepreneurs can find lucrative business opportunities as salvaged or rediscovered wood is in high demand.

A huge part of our mission to keep old wood (we define that as pre-1970) from going into landfills. Whether it’s flooring, wood studs, doors, rafters or whatever, please don’t throw it out. If you’re remodeling an older home, please instruct your contractor to call us. At the very least, we’ll haul that wood away free and either recycle it ourselves or get it to someone who will reuse it. In some cases, we’ll make you a cash offer. Or, have your contractor take the reusable supplies to your local Habitat for Humanity Re-Store. Either way, you’ll be doing the environment a favor.

via Keep that old wood out of the landfill!.

Recycled wood: the green key to a sustainable built environment | Guardian Sustainable Business | Guardian Professional

Redwood trees in sequoia national forest

Valuable wood sourced from redwood trees is being routinely wasted in the US. Photograph: Graham Whitby-Boot /Sportsphoto Ltd/Allstar

Home building has long been one of the most important industries in the US, with economists viewing statistics concerning new homes as a barometer for the countrys economic performance.

Americans affinity for newer and bigger homes, however, comes with a huge environmental cost. The recent foreclosure crisis is just a reminder of all the resources waste on millions of homes that have been abandoned and, yet again, remodelled. One precious resource used for these buildings that often goes unnoticed and is then lost forever is wood.

The remodelling and demolishing of homes in the US results in the equivalent of 250,000 single-family homes being interred in landfills or incinerated each year. Among the dry wall, plastic and concrete that are disposed of is lumber sourced from Americas forests. Within this lumber, there is also wood from older homes. This is especially valuable because it is of higher quality than material used in most new construction projects.

Wood in homes built 50 years ago or earlier was often sourced from first-growth forests. Whether a small, older home being destroyed for a larger, more modern home, or a historic beach-front house being targeted for removal and upgrade by a presidential candidate, these houses are a treasure trove of sturdy wood that builders should reclaim. Entrepreneurs can find lucrative business opportunities as salvaged or rediscovered wood is in high demand.

Current construction and demolition C&D techniques, however, are destructive and render most wood completely useless. Too much wood enters the C&D waste stream and then disappears forever. Of the approximate 70m tons of wood sent to landfill annually, the US government estimates 30m tons of it could have been reused.

Currently about 10% to 20% of wood discarded during construction projects is prevented from entering landfills. Pallets, however, account for most of that material, and hence that lower-quality wood is often shredded and used for mulch. But while aluminium, glass, paper and plastic are often culled for recycling from construction sites prior to final disposal, wood is overlooked and is about 17% of the waste that ends up in municipal dumps.

Meanwhile, valuable woods including Douglas fir and redwood, which could be repurposed for several more decades of use, are wasted. Evidence suggests that more tactical demolition practices can actually save and generate money for construction projects from reduced landfill fees and the sale of salvaged wood.

The national trade group for companies tasked with tearing down buildings, the National Demolition Association, has long claimed its member companies have been “environmentally responsible”. Rhetoric aside, however, the association now cajoles companies to consider the smarter reuse of materials and increased diversion of waste from landfill, both of which can give builders more points if they are building a LEED-certified project.

Smarter demolition can also create good business opportunities for companies that undertake such projects at a lower cost in return for the rights to all recyclable materials. Careful deconstruction of old structures also creates business for local companies that cater to consumers who want their homes to become more eco-friendly.

Read the entire article via Recycled wood: the green key to a sustainable built environment | Guardian Sustainable Business | Guardian Professional.