Tag Archives: Restore

Nothing In Nature Is Wasted: Reclaimed Wood | WXPR

Two national examples of this trend toward reclaimed wood are the Building Materials Reuse Association, which is a nonprofit educational organization with a mission to facilitate the salvage and reuse of building materials, and more locally, the Habitat for Humanity ReStores, which are retail outlets where used and surplus building materials are sold. Approximately 30% of sales are wood-based materials. Nationally, more than 55 million tons of wood waste is generated on an annual basis. About half of this material is of acceptable size, quality, and condition to be considered available for recovery. Clearly, the amount of waste wood available for recovery in the U.S. is a substantial figure.

Source: Nothing In Nature Is Wasted: Reclaimed Wood | WXPR

Akron Ohio News – Deconstruction program building up community

A home in the 500 block of Euclid Avenue slated for demolition, located adjacent to the Akron Zoo, was one of Habitat for Humanity of Summit County’s recent deconstruction projects, shown above. Staff of the nonprofit removed and recycled aluminum siding, gutters and downspouts, with proceeds to be reinvested in the community.

The current program has Habitat going into houses and other buildings before another contractor demolishes them, so that cabinets, doors, vanities, countertops, light fixtures, windows and other items can be removed. Some items are then sold at the ReStore. Other materials such as furnaces, hot water tanks, aluminum siding, gutters, downspouts, aluminum windows, window frames and copper pipes are recycled for scrap, said Sibbio.

Source: Akron Ohio News – Deconstruction program building up community

Recycled Art Contest | Milwaukee Habitat for Humanity

ReStore’s 7th Annual Recycled Art Contest shines a light on some of Milwaukee’s resourceful repurposers. The contest challenges the public to create works primarily using the donated product found at ReStore. From artwork to repurposed furniture, the only rule of the contest is the majority of materials must be purchased at ReStore.

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With 34 entries to choose from, the works are judged by the public with polling stations in store and online HERE. The top five vote getters will receive ReStore shopping sprees. As for the artists, they range from professionals like Debby Koenig of Earthfire Artistry (entry 20) to group art classes from the Milwaukee Center for Independence.

Winners will be revealed during the Third Ward’s Gallery Night, April 15th at ReStore East (5pm-9pm). The entire exhibit will be featured in the Historic Third Ward’s Gallery Night & Day, April 15th & 16th at Restore East (420 S 1st, Milwaukee), with many of the works for sale to the public.

 

Source: Recycled Art Contest | Milwaukee Habitat for Humanity

REvision Division Reduces Waste by Thinking Outside the Box – WhatcomTalk

Design and Build masterminds Matt Vaughn (L) and David Spangler (R) unleash their creativity in each furniture piece. Photo courtesy: REvision Division.

“Eberhard’s influence helped us shift from a value-added mindset to actively pursuing difficult-to-divert materials from the waste stream — shifting the focus to education outreach and behavior change,” Gisclair notes. “We wanted people to see the value and what the possibilities are to repurpose materials that are widely perceived as trash — wooden or flooring shorts, frame pieces, things that we wouldn’t normally accept at the RE Store.”

Source: REvision Division Reduces Waste by Thinking Outside the Box – WhatcomTalk

Racine man turns old into new to help Habitat for Humanity

Habitat For Humanity volunteer Dan Mundell shows off the piano bar he created at Habitat ReStore, 2300 DeKoven Ave. Mundell has made a half-dozen creations out of donated items for ReStore. GREGORY SHAVER, gregory.shaver@journaltimes.com

So far, Mundell has assembled a half dozen creations for ReStore, including a recent re-imagining of a bar using the pieces an old, donated piano. “I’m just doing this for the fun of it,” Mundell said. “I have never sold anything for myself. The things I do are for my family and the ReStore. It’s great fun to make these things and I get a lot of satisfaction in knowing that I’m helping out how I can.”

Source: Racine man turns old into new to help Habitat for Humanity

Bellingham’s co-op getting started with parking lot expansion | Bellingham Herald

RE Store workers Zack Zuniga, left, and Jake Bollinger strip the inside of the old Community Connections building on Forest Street in Bellingham on Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2016. The building is being removed and the material recycled to make way for additional parking for the Community Food Co-op store.

RE Store workers Zack Zuniga, left, and Jake Bollinger strip the inside of the old Community Connections building on Forest Street in Bellingham on Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2016. The building is being removed and the material recycled to make way for additional parking for the Community Food Co-op store. Philip A. Dwyer pdwyer@bhamherald.com

This week workers from RE Store began deconstructing the former Community Connections building on the corner of East Chestnut and North Forest streets to make way for the parking lot expansion. Once that is complete, work will begin putting in retaining walls and extra parking spaces for the store, which is at 1220 N. Forest St.

Source: Bellingham’s co-op getting started with parking lot expansion | Bellingham Herald

Restoring Lakewood apartment on the cheap has been a labor of love for retiree: Cool Spaces (photos) | cleveland.com

Jackie Taylor, 63, hangs out with his dog Rufus inside his open kitchen in his upstairs flat that he has almost finished renovating in Lakewood. Taylor broke down a wall to the left to give the kitchen and open feel. The entire kitchen redo has only cost $2,000 with used materials, he said. (Lisa DeJong/The Plain Dealer)

He prides himself on creating an affordable vintage space where everything is restored, repaired and reused. Most of the materials came from Habitat for Humanity.

“At first I bought it as an investment,” says Taylor, who paid $200,000 for the building. “But after spending so much time here working on the apartments, I thought, ‘I really like it here.'”

Jackie Taylor had to scrape all the white paint off of the original woodwork which includes built-in bookcases and a bench in the living room of his 1920s apartment. (Lisa DeJong/The Plain Dealer)

via Restoring Lakewood apartment on the cheap has been a labor of love for retiree: Cool Spaces (photos) | cleveland.com.

Expensive painting sold for $12 at local Habitat for Humanity ReStore | Blogs | Detroit Metro Times

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Meagan Nowicki was shopping at Habitat for Humanity’s Habitat Metro Restore on Greenfield in Detroit when a painting caught her eye. She says she thought it looked familiar and for a price tag of $12, she couldn’t pass it up.

Turns out the piece of art is worth an astonishing $900. Detroit artist, the late Max Shaye painted the piece before he died in 2004.

via Expensive painting sold for $12 at local Habitat for Humanity ReStore | Blogs | Detroit Metro Times.

No landfill for convention center’s old carpet | Finance & Commerce

No landfill for convention center’s old carpet

Workers remove carpet tiles from the Minneapolis Convention Center, 1301 Second Ave. S., as part of a renovation project. The tiles are available for purchase at Habitat for Humanity ReStores in Willmar and Mankato. (Submitted photo)

The tiles will be available for purchase at Habitat for Humanity ReStores in Willmar and Mankato, said Nathan Benjamin, who heads up the Kansas City-based firm’s new Global Reuse Services operation.

About four semi-truck loads of the tiles have been taken out of the building for new uses, Benjamin said. It’s a big deal, because cushion-backed carpet tiles like those can’t be recycled, he said.

via No landfill for convention center’s old carpet | Finance & Commerce.

Upcycling makes the old look brand new – The Park Record

Habitat for Humanity of Summit and Wasatch counties recently held a contest to see who could best upcycle used furniture. A bench made from an old

Habitat for Humanity of Summit and Wasatch counties recently held a contest to see who could best upcycle used furniture. A bench made from an old headboard was the winning piece, submitted by Joli Pichot, of Ogden. (Courtesy of Habitat for Humanity)

via Upcycling makes the old look brand new – The Park Record.

Deconstruction, not demolition, is the way to go – The Park Record

This home on Lucky John Drive was recently deconstructed by The ReUse People, a California nonprofit that has recently expanded into Utah, whichThis home on Lucky John Drive was recently deconstructed by The ReUse People, a California nonprofit that has recently expanded into Utah, which transported the salvaged materials to Recycle Utah. We had people standing in line waiting for the next pallet to be taken off the truck, said Recycle Utah Executive Director Insa Riepen. (Courtesy of Recycle Utah)

Sustainability is an increasingly important global issue and building demolitions and renovations appear to be an overlooked area of focus. When The ReUse People get a demolition project, they don’t rip everything out, load it into dumpsters and take it to a landfill — they take the building apart a little more carefully and save all the materials that can be salvaged — about 90 percent of a typical home.

via Deconstruction, not demolition, is the way to go – The Park Record.

Baltimore Fishbowl Southwest Baltimore Mural Evinces Second Chance – Baltimore Fishbowl

photo via Second Chance

“Something that has come up over and over in our conversations with community members is how much they value the history of Baltimore and their commitment to the future of Baltimore,” Powers said in a description of the work.

Second Chance, located at 1700 Ridgely Street, was an apt choice. The organization deconstructs older buildings to make the materials available for reuse, and its workforce is made up of people who face barriers to employment.

via Baltimore Fishbowl Southwest Baltimore Mural Evinces Second Chance – Baltimore Fishbowl.

Mayfair Donation Drive | Milwaukee Habitat for Humanity

On Saturday, April 26th from 10am until 2pm ReStore staff and volunteers will be set up in Macy’s Northeast lot at Mayfair.

ReStore will be collecting donations of resalable as well as recyclable material. In addition to accepting donations of gently used furnishings and home goods, community members can donate clothing, shoes, toys, faulty or outdated electronics and computer equipment. ReStore works in partnership with licensed recycling partners to responsibly break down materials that cannot be resold, like computers. Proceeds from these recyclable materials, just like donations of resalable materials, go towards building homes, community and hope through Habitat for Humanity’s work in Milwaukee. As a bonus, all donors during the drive will receive special thank you gifts from ReStore and participating Mayfair businesses.

via Mayfair Donation Drive | Milwaukee Habitat for Humanity.

Making old new again: Habitat for Humanity challenges designers to create rooms from ReStore finds | Port City Daily

Mary Jo Shipman, left, seen here at Habitat for Humanity ReStore manager Amanda Rodriguez, is one of 20 local designers competing in the non-profit's upcoming Upscale Resale Challenge. Photos by Hilary Snow.

Photos by Hilary Snow.

Mary Jo Shipman, left, seen here at Habitat for Humanity ReStore manager Amanda Rodriguez, is one of 20 local designers competing in the nonprofit’s upcoming Upscale Resale Challenge.

via Making old new again: Habitat for Humanity challenges designers to create rooms from ReStore finds | Port City Daily.

Montco Habitat for Humanity hosts design challenge

Designer Kristen Albone at work Wednesday in the dining room of the Habitat for Humanity House in Hatfield in preparation for the UpCycle contest. (The Reporter/Geoff Patton)

Meanwhile, Habitat decided to use the empty home to promote the idea of repurposing furniture, or upcycling. The challenge suggests that contestants utilize thrift stores such as ReStore, a nonprofit home improvement store and donation center that benefits HFHMC. “We’re encouraging them to use as many items from the ReStore as possible,” Lynch said. The store sells furniture, paint, light fixtures and anything else you’d need to decorate a home. Designers are also allowed to buy materials elsewhere, but they can’t spend more than $500.

Diane, left, and Kamile Pietrak with a decorative wall hanging for a bedroom of the Habitat for Humanity house in Hatfield. (The Reporter/@GeoffPatton)

via Montco Habitat for Humanity hosts design challenge.

Nonprofits host sustainability workshops, galleries – The Western Front: News

Art expo hosts sustainability workshops and entertainment

Photo by Bailey Barnard

Instructor Eberhard Eichner, 60, explains how to use hollow core doors as building material, Saturday, April 5 at Allied Arts of Whatcom County. Eichner shows the group how doors can be recycled into functional furniture with tools found around the house. The chests are made of repurposed 2-by-4s, hollow and closet doors. The free seminar is put on by The REStore and hosted by Allied Arts in correspondence with the Recycled Art and Resource Expo.

via Nonprofits host sustainability workshops, galleries – The Western Front: News.

Channel 6 Lawrence, KS – A Division of WOW

University of Kansas students put their skills to the test for the Kansas Impact Project to benefit local non-profits.

The Habitat for Humanity ReStore has consulted with the group of students over the past year.

Students conducted a cost analysis to determine whether or not ReStore should move locations.

Thursday, they presented research methods and recommendations for ReStore.

The students decided that the current ReStore location is the best because it is in central Lawrence and the monthly rent is a good price for the area.

via Channel 6 Lawrence, KS – A Division of WOW.

MaxLite and Habitat for Humanity Announce Partnership to Provide Energy-Efficient Lighting Nationwide

MaxLite® is partnering with Habitat for Humanity to provide energy-efficient lighting for Habitat ReStore resale outlet customers nationwide. As part of the partnership, Habitat restores have begun selling discounted ENERGY STAR®-qualified compact fluorescent CFL and light emitting diode LED lamps and fixtures. MaxLite is also donating $180,000 in ENERGY STAR-qualified products for 300 homes that will be built during Habitat for Humanity’s Home Builders Blitz in June. MaxLite has also partnered with utility programs across the country to provide additional discounts on lighting products to Habitat ReStores.

via MaxLite and Habitat for Humanity Announce Partnership to Provide Energy-Efficient Lighting Nationwide.

Tim and Hannah’s Affordable DIY Self-Sustainable Micro Cabin House Tour | Apartment Therapy

The two integrated as many recycled, salvaged, low-impact materials into their design as possible. A good amount of building material was acquired for free from Craigslist. Seconds, mis-sized, and salvaged materials were sourced from their local lumbar yard and the Restore.

via Tim and Hannah’s Affordable DIY Self-Sustainable Micro Cabin House Tour | Apartment Therapy.

{ diy design } philadelphia home show upcycle challenge | DESIGN + LIFE + KIDS: { diy design } philadelphia home show upcycle challenge

Scott and I are participating a local upcycle project called the Unhinged Challenge. It’s hosted by the Philadelphia Home Show and Habitat for Humanity and we’re super excited to share what we’ve been working on!  We were asked to source and repurpose a door from the Habitat for Humanity ReStore and turn it into a functional item or hand painted pieces of art. Here are the details…

We visited the Philadelphia Restore and choose this beautiful lightweight bifold door. It looks brand new and we could see it would create a great box shape! So we tossed around a few ideas… we wanted to create something visually beautiful, modern and useful. Then we came up with the Garden Bento Box.

If you like this design vote for them here!

via { diy design } philadelphia home show upcycle challenge | DESIGN + LIFE + KIDS: { diy design } philadelphia home show upcycle challenge.

ReStore selling huge donation of valuable artwork | Milwaukee Habitat for Humanity

ReStore just got in a large collection of original artwork and signed prints generously donated. The collection consists of original works by notable artists like: Karel Appel, Sara Strozinsky, & Patrick Farrell, among others.

In April 2013, Milwaukee Habitat for Humanity launched a new Neighborhood Revitalization Initiative strategy. For the next three to five years we will focus our efforts in one neighborhood — Washington Park. We are working together with our partner families and other neighborhood organizations to execute a comprehensive sustainable community plan. Our goal is transform Washington Park into a safe, vibrant neighborhood of choice.

Help us achieve this goal by shopping, donating, and volunteering at either of our two ReStore locations: 3015 N 114th, Wauwatosa & 420 S 1st, Milwaukee. Both locations just stocked works of fine art from the collection, but at these prices, supplies won’t last long. Shop ReStore and get fine art, for less! Both ReStores are open Tuesday-Friday 10-6 & Saturday 10-4. We will be closed Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year’s Eve, and New Year’s Day.

via ReStore selling huge donation of valuable artwork | Milwaukee Habitat for Humanity.

Audubon School salvage brings thousands to charity | WQAD.com

Habitat ReStore

They were able to salvage items from Rock Island’s former Audubon School before it gets torn down in coming weeks.  The vacant school building is being demolished, and the land it currently stands on is being sold.

As of Friday, November 15, 2013,  the organization has made an estimated $17,000 from selling those items.

via Audubon School salvage brings thousands to charity | WQAD.com.

Little Free libraries sprouting in Bellingham | State | The News Tribune

Eberhard Eichner

Furniture builder Eberhard Eichner looks at one of the outdoor Little Free Library boxes he makes from reused building material at the REStore in Bellingham, Friday Nov. 1, 2013. Eichner shows customers how to make furniture out of used building materials.

Q: How well has the concept caught on?

A: Amazingly well! More than 10,000 Little Free libraries have been installed nationwide. There are more than two dozen Little Free libraries in Bellingham. If you go on their website you can click on a map for each city and find out where each Little Free Library is located.

Q: So, essentially, people leave books in small, protected bookshelves to share with their neighbors?

A: That’s right. I absolutely love the idea. I’m an avid reader myself, with eclectic tastes; research books, poetry, mysteries.

Q: What are these little libraries made of?

A: The libraries currently on display and available for purchase utilize former upper kitchen cabinets. A second “outer skin” with a roof is put around the existing shape using reclaimed cedar boards, shakes, shingles or other scrap exterior siding material. They’re like little “houses” for books.

via Little Free libraries sprouting in Bellingham | State | The News Tribune.

DIY: Teach an old door new tricks | Vancouver 24 hrs

Here is the door from Habitat for Humanity's ReStore! You can see where I'm going to saw in order to make the shelf. (JULIA DILWORTH/ 24 HOURS)

Every DIYer has their comfort zone, and sawing wood is about as far out of mine as possible. Still, I wanted to push myself to try something new with this door challenge, and despite countless miscalculations/errors/accidents, I managed to execute my hanging shelf concept: something to help organize towels and toiletries in the bathroom, or scarves and belts in the bedroom.

via DIY: Teach an old door new tricks | Vancouver 24 hrs.

Utica United candidates push deconstruction program – Utica, NY – The Observer-Dispatch, Utica, New York

Utica – Standing in front of a boarded up building on Lincoln Avenue, the five Utica United candidates presented their plan for more deconstruction efforts in the city.

Led by Councilman Jim Zecca, D-at-large, the candidates urged the city and the county to use the planned Habitat for Humanity Re-Store to spur more deconstruction efforts instead of simply demolishing older homes in the area.

“There’s been too many buildings in this city that’ve been demolished, just destroyed; especially our architectural heritage, we’ve lost to the wrecking ball,” he said. “With the new Habitat for Humanity Re-store opening up, this is a large piece in a building materials recover strategy that can help restore the city.”

Since deconstruction is more labor intensive, the program could also lead to more jobs, said Martinez.

“Folks in my neighborhood would rather work than have idle time,” she said.

via Utica United candidates push deconstruction program – Utica, NY – The Observer-Dispatch, Utica, New York.

The milling floor: Wood Cycle, Habitat ReStore pair to find use for felled trees | The Oregon Observer

Paul Morrison, owner of Wood Cycle of Wisconsin, has been turning potentially wasted wood from local trees into beautiful hardwood flooring since May and selling it to Habitat ReStore West in Madison.

via The milling floor: Wood Cycle, Habitat ReStore pair to find use for felled trees | The Oregon Observer.

Take it all down and out : Reedsburg Times-Press

wrapping for delivery

There was a lot of banging, wrapping, yanking, yelling and loading going on Tuesday at the Culver’s location in Reedsburg. Habitat for Humanity folks was “deconstructing” the building that has housed a Culver’s restaurant since 1987. It didn’t matter if something was nailed down, screwed in or looked to be in one piece. The hard-working, fast-deconstructing crew of volunteers soon had it on a pile, ready to be loaded into the Restore’s truck.

“We always begin with a prayer,” Holzman said. “There’s a reason for that. We all want to walk away safely.”

With ladders to the ceiling, multiple saws, hammers pounding or pulling out nails, and large items shuffling out of doors, concern for safety wasn’t misplaced. But these are veterans and managed to stay out of each other’s way.

Awning supports moving on out

More nails

via Take it all down and out : Reedsburg Times-Press.

ReStore retired – Local – The Journal Pioneer

Susan Zambonin, executive director of Habitat for Humanity P.E.I., said that the only reason the store was allowed to stay open as long as it did was because it was the organization’s major footprint in the community.

“It’s actually better for us financially that it not be there, because it’s taking away from our building program. But it did have value in that it kept our name out in front of the community,” she said.

via ReStore retired – Local – The Journal Pioneer.

KDLT.com South Dakota News – Habitat For Humanity To Be In Documentary

Niki Schillerstrom, Community Relations Director, Habitat for Humanity of Greater Sioux Falls said, “We’re inviting local artists from high school all the way up to professional to shop the store to pick out items that will offer at no charge to them, then they will repurpose it into a piece of art work that they will donate back to us.”

Schillerstrom is the brains behind the ‘Restoration Art Auction.’ Schillerstrom said once the art work is donated back, it will be bid on. The money will go towards the Habitat for Humanity’s Restore. Initially the goal was to raise $1,000, but Schillerstrom said so many people have expressed interest in creating art for the auction; they will most likely exceed that.

And South Dakotans aren’t the only people interested in the auction, so is one man, from Massachusetts.

“Reusing as a whole, it’s great for people, it’s great for the planet, and it’s great for your wallet,” Alex Eaves, a Restore Pro said.

But Eaves decided he wanted a more visual way to share the importance of reusing. So with a cameraman by his side, Eaves is traveling through all 48 landlocked states to make a documentary.

“Not only am I show casing how I reuse, and my brand, but I’m also teaming up with people in every state to see how they reuse in different ways all across the country,” Eaves said.

Sioux Falls was the 34th stop on his tour.

via KDLT.com South Dakota News – Habitat For Humanity To Be In Documentary.

ReStore ReUse Contest Ends August 31

The purpose of the contest is to showcase innovative building projects constructed predominantly of used building materials. “Our customers often tell us about the projects they make using materials purchased at the ReStore. This contest is a great way to showcase their projects and inspire others to reuse, recycle and repurpose usable building materials and supplies,” said Scott Stetson, ReStore General Manager.

Five judges will select winners in the following categories: Furniture, Homesteading and Live/Work Space. Best in Show will also be awarded.

ReStore ReUse Contest Ends August 31.

Salvaged goods from old buildings gaining in popularity – Home & Garden – MiamiHerald.com

Anthony Barrineau, co-owner of Alternative Constructors in Fort Lauderdale, leans against the reclaimed dining room table in a Fort Lauderdale home the company is remodeling. MARSHA HALPER / Miami Herald Staff

In the last decade, Florida-based contractors, interior designers and builders have started to pull reusable items from torn-down homes and buildings for use in other projects.

Shambora said he tries to incorporate reused goods into every project. He keeps a phone list of demolition companies and retrieves materials like mirrors, drawers and wood when the phone rings.

“We offer something different. It’s not your cookie cutter, out-of-the-box construction company,” Shambora said.

The buying market is also strong, said Missy Monokian, director of ReStore for Habitat for Humanity of Greater Miami. The Liberty City store, which closed in March, sold used items like hurricane shutters, plumbing supplies, drywall and plywood. On an average day, Monokian said the store served several hundred people.

via Salvaged goods from old buildings gaining in popularity – Home & Garden – MiamiHerald.com.

RIVERSIDE: Habitat projects include Women Build, dollhouse art | Riverside News | PE.com – Press-Enterprise

Recent projects by Habitat for Humanity Riverside include the building of their 58th home by volunteers in pink hardhats, and Riverside ReStore’s Artist Showcase. On the left Moreno Valley Lowes Employees volunteer on the Habitat Women Build project. On the right, great-grandmother Patricia Hill, grandmother Belvia Bailey, mother Selena Wilson and granddaughter Kaelah Wilson, are participating in the Artist Showcase with, grandson Roulan Wilson, not pictured.

via RIVERSIDE: Habitat projects include Women Build, dollhouse art | Riverside News | PE.com – Press-Enterprise.

Confessions of a tile addict | HamptonRoads.com | PilotOnline.com

At the Restore store she could “buy mismatched tiles, and we could finally put down a tile floor on our 180-square-foot screened porch, and get rid of our horrible plastic, green-grass carpet.”

Away Skeen went, spending hours sorting through boxes and stacks of tiles. She knew the ones she chose had to be the same thickness, the right dimensions and in colors that would work.

After spending $171 dollars, and buying several hundred tiles, she and her husband, Greg Skeen, were ready for the porch transformation.

Greta experimented with tile layouts for the porch amid trees and nature. After deciding on a pattern, she and Greg “gleefully” ripped out the green carpet reminiscent of “The Brady Bunch” backyard.

via Confessions of a tile addict | HamptonRoads.com | PilotOnline.com.

Materials from building, set to be new Ikea location, help – KCTV5

The beginning of the demolition of the vacant Circuit City building. (Michael Ross/KCTV5)

MERRIAM, KS (KCTV) –

A vacant shopping center will be demolished Wednesday morning to make room for the first Ikea in Kansas.

An empty shopping center in the metro is set to be home to one of the most popular stores in the world, IKEA.

The 349,000-square-foot proposed IKEA store would be built along the eastern side of Interstate 35 at Johnson Drive exit on 18 acres to be purchased from DDR Corp.

The shopping center was built in 2008 for a Circuit City, but the company never moved in because it went bankrupt. The building that has been vacant for about five years will be torn down Wednesday. The unused material from it and the surrounding shopping center will be used to help Heartland Habitat for Humanity.

“We went in there and took just about everything that wasn’t nailed down and some that was,” said Wally Binney, director for Heartland Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore program.

Volunteers for Habitat for Humanity searched for anything they could salvage from the building.

“Ceiling fixtures, light fixtures, displays, doors, handicapped toilets, sinks, mirrors,” Binney said. “Even the shrubbery out in the parking lot.”

The beginning of the demolition of the vacant Circuit City building. (Michael Ross/KCTV5)

via Materials from building, set to be new Ikea location, help – KCTV5.

Snowbird cast-offs put household goods up for grabs | The Desert Sun | mydesert.com

David Nunez and Danielle McCowan of La Quinta search for items to renovate their bathroom at the ReStore, a Habitat for Humanity second-hand store, in Palm Desert.

David Nunez and Danielle McCowan of La Quinta search for items to renovate their bathroom at the ReStore, a Habitat for Humanity second-hand store, in Palm Desert. / Richard Lui/The Desert Sun

Very few retail outlets sell sleek stainless steel Kitchen Aid ovens for $125. Or for that matter, a toilet outfitted with a brass bidet for about $40.

These are the kinds of appliances and other household products for sale at ReStore, the Habitat for Humanity-operated secondhand store in Palm Desert. And many of these items came from second homes being renovated by snowbirds, store officials say.

“So they’ll get rid of their cabinets. Or they’ll get rid of their furniture. Because sometimes in the majority of these donations it’s somebody cleaning their house out as they move away for the summer,” said Patrick Swarthout, president of the board of directors for Habitat for Humanity of the Coachella Valley. “Or having contractors come in and have them remodel during the summer while they’re gone.”

via Snowbird cast-offs put household goods up for grabs | The Desert Sun | mydesert.com.

Studios donating film set materials to Habitat for Humanity – latimes.com

When the upcoming comedy “The Hangover Part III” wrapped production in January, Warner Bros. was left with tons of used plywood, joists, furniture, faux brick and other materials from the film set.

But instead of hauling the leftovers to the landfill, the studio donated the items — enough to fill 10 truckloads — to the charitable organization Habitat for Humanity of Greater Los Angeles, to be sold in Habitat’s stores in Gardena and Norwalk. The proceeds supported the organization’s mission of building and renovating homes for the needy.

“The crews take pride in what they’ve built, so if we’re able to salvage the materials and give them another use, everyone feels good about that,” said Mike Slavich, director of sustainability for Warner Bros. Entertainment. The studio last month supplied Habitat’s stores with more than 30 rolls of carpet and linoleum flooring from the set of the CBS TV show “The Mentalist.”

via Studios donating film set materials to Habitat for Humanity – latimes.com.

William & Mary – Building relationships between College, community at Habitat ReStore

“As soon as we learned the ReStore was coming in, we knew this was something we wanted to do,” said Elizabeth Miller, coordinator of community engagement for William & Mary. “Since then, I don’t think we’ve done a big service or group program where we haven’t done something with the ReStore—it came out of an existing relationship that just blossomed.”

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With only three paid employees, a diverse group of volunteers is both the ReStore’s lifeblood and a cross-section of the Williamsburg community: William & Mary students join dedicated retirees as well as members of civic groups, the military and local businesses in routinely devoting their time and energy to Habitat’s mission.

“Every time I’ve sent a group, it’s always such a positive experience,” Miller said. “That’s what’s been great for me—we want students to come to a place where they’re learning about community issues but also feeling like they’re involved in the community. I think that’s one of the things that happen when they come here because they’re meeting other William & Mary groups, but they’re also meeting other community members. That’s the really cool thing: they’re getting conversations and learning about everyone who comes here because it’s such a diverse draw for volunteers and people who shop here.”

The ReStore staff tries to encourage these meaningful connections between William & Mary students and the community in which they live.

via William & Mary – Building relationships between College, community at Habitat ReStore.

Upcycling Competition Benefits Habitat for Humanity | UF Newsroom

UF's Habitat for Humanity poses for a photo with the winning upcycled object.

Each club received a used medicine cabinet and two weeks to create something new. Participants created a number of things, including spice racks, nightstands and mail holders.

While on display, students voted for the best project and the top three organizations won prize money. The Pre-Med Club hosted an ice cream social, and the Wilderness Club held an activity for students to make key chains or jewelry from washers, paper and hemp cords.

“This event brings different student organizations together for a common purpose,” said Brock. ”We also raised over $200 for Habitat for Humanity of Hancock County.”

via Upcycling Competition Benefits Habitat for Humanity | UF Newsroom.

Built for Speed: Habitat Raises an Upcycled Structure in 48 Hours – Earth911.com

The winning design

Called “Light Wall,” the winning design is a prism of salvaged materials that transforms light. Once inside, visitors encounter a space tucked behind a wall, where light filters in through hundreds of multicolored glass bottles and bathes the space in colored light.

Designed by Scott Hefner and Abe Drechsler, two juniors from the North Carolina State University College of Design in Raleigh, NC, the structure is meant as an outdoor public lounging space and art installation.

“This ‘Light Wall’ showcases the concept that reused materials can be very beautiful architectural elements,” the winners wrote in their design layout.

In a mere 48 hours, Hefner and Drechsler’s design came to life in the Wake County Habitat for Humanity ReStore, with the help of a professional build team and hundreds of volunteers. Scroll through to see how they did it and peep more photos of this amazing upcycled structure.

Creating the light prism

A closer look at the recycled bottle prism

via Built for Speed: Habitat Raises an Upcycled Structure in 48 Hours – Earth911.com.

The RE Store’s 12th Annual Recycled Arts Show – April 2013

The RE Store’s 12th Annual

Art piece - Jubilee by Julia HaackRecycled Arts Show

Our Annual Recycled Arts Show in April and early May of 2013 will showcase three galleries in two cities, participatory art in action and other surprises that are still in the works.

Check out the CALL FOR ART AND FUNCTIONAL DESIGNS

Seattle Call for Art and Functional Designs

Bellingham Call for Art and Functional Designs

The RE Store has been highlighting creative reuse, art and functional pieces made from reclaimed and found materials for a dozen years now. Our partners include galleries, non-profit organizations and a wide spectrum of artists from greater Cascadia (the Pacific NW and BC):

We will be partnering with the North Sound Bay Keeper and the Surfrider Foundation again this year. View our blog story about the Beach Litter Art Installation from last year.

recycled art trio by westfall and lovett

via The RE Store’s 12th Annual Recycled Arts Show – April 2013.

Celebrating 20 Years Of Habitat For Humanity: ReStore Holds More Than Junk | Door County Daily News

Full time volunteer Kevin Clark constructs a birdhouse during the 20th Anniversary Celebration at the Habitat for Humanity ReStore on 14th Ave. in Sturgeon Bay.

Habitat for Humanity Board President Mike Stephani says one Habitat goal is to build an entire house with items donated to the ReStore. “Right now, we’ve got about half of a house,” he says.

via Celebrating 20 Years Of Habitat For Humanity: ReStore Holds More Than Junk | Door County Daily News.

Home featuring Habitat for Humanity fixtures hosts fundraiser for nonprofit – Carroll County Times: Local

Open house for Habitat for Humanity

“I shopped at the [Habitat for Humanity] ReStore in Frederick,” Jantz said of the supplies used in the 1880s building’s extensive renovations. “And they helped me keep to my budget. Times are a little tighter than normal.”

The chandelier in the dining room was purchased from the nonprofit’s store, as well as some of the appliances and cabinets, she said. These and other items were tagged throughout the building so visitors could see just what types of finds are available at the salvage store.

via Home featuring Habitat for Humanity fixtures hosts fundraiser for nonprofit – Carroll County Times: Local.

MAKING OLD NEW AGAIN: ReStore – The Local Show – YouTube

Everybody seems to be more concerned about the environment these days. Keeping as much waste out of landfills as possible is one step towards preserving our resources. What happens when someone tears down a house to make way for a new one?As part of our ongoing reporting project with broadcast students at Johnson County Community College, we take a closer look at how a non-profit group called Habitat ReStore is finding new ways to recycle old materials that would have been destined for the landfill.

via MAKING OLD NEW AGAIN: ReStore – The Local Show – YouTube.

Habitat for Humanity International to open hundreds of new ReStores | SaportaReport

Published in the Atlanta Business Chronicle on Friday, December 21, 2012

Habitat for Humanity International is going from building homes to developing its own retail business.

The international nonprofit known for building and renovating affordable single-family homes since 1976 is now in the social enterprise business.

It is developing a national chain of stores — ReStore — that is selling discount building products, furniture and appliances as a way to generate new revenues so it can build more houses around the world.

ReStore is both a national and a local story — a concept that is breaking new ground for the Atlanta-based nonprofit — one that has the potential of raising hundreds of millions of dollars for the organization.

“We are looking to create a sustainable business model for ReStore,” said Larry Gluth, Habitat’s senior vice president for the United States and Canada. “This is like taking a chunk of clay and molding it into a beautiful vase. The assets are largely in place.”

Gluth, a former Starbucks executive with a background in franchising, envisions Habitat opening 300 to 400 new ReStores in the next five years — potentially generating $1 billion in gross revenues and between $300 million and $400 million in net income.

“We have estimated that with those type of increases, we could serve another 25,000 families a year around the globe,” Gluth said. “What has really resonated with the donors is that this is a wonderful social enterprise. It is a sustainable model that generates funds for Habitat. And we kept about 200 million tons of material out of landfills last year.”

Habitat International has just received a $1.5 million grant from the Robert W. Woodruff Foundation to help create a regional cluster of ReStores in metro Atlanta.

The collaborative venture will give Habitat International the ability to develop and operate Restores throughout the metro area. If the pilot concept is successful, Gluth said that Habitat will explore creating other regional clusters of Restores around the country.

At the same time, one of the local affiliates — Atlanta Habitat for Humanity — will be dramatically expanding its ReStore when the local nonprofit moves from its cramped leased space on 3 acres at 519 Memorial Drive to its new, more spacious 5.3 acre-headquarters just a few blocks away at 824 Memorial Drive.

Read the rest of the article via Habitat for Humanity International to open hundreds of new ReStores | SaportaReport.

Way To Go Andrea! | Loveland Habitat for Humanity, Colorado

Congratulations to Andrea Yates, the Loveland Habitat for Humanity ReStore Volunteer of the Month for December. Andrea has been volunteering at the ReStore for more than 6 years. “Andrea is very hard working, has wonderful customer service skills and is very reliable. We love having her here,” said Carmen Engle, the Volunteer Coordinator. “Andrea works in housewares and helps to sort all the hundreds of boxes of donation we receive every week. Thank you Andrea!!”

via Way To Go Andrea! | Loveland Habitat for Humanity, Colorado.

Rumble at the Warehouse | CNRG

ReStore

Rumble at the Warehouse

Volunteering

Help the Habitat for Humanity ReStore get ready to move into its new location at 10445 SE Cherry Blossom Dr. Portland, OR 97215.

We need volunteers to help us build merchandise shelves, paint, sweep, sort, carry, take things apart, put things back together… the list goes on! This is a great opportunity for individuals who like to keep busy.

New to the Habitat ReStore? We are a volunteer run thrift store that takes in donations of quality new and used building materials and home improvement supplies, and sells them to the public at a low cost. All the money raised from the sale of these items goes to Habitat for Humanity to help with home building efforts in this community. We are also diverting tons of usable materials from the land fill by providing a place to donate these unique items.

Must be 16 or over (under 18? you must have a waiver signed by a parent before working…forms available online http://www.pdxrestore.org ). No experience necessary but a little flexibility, a good sense of humor and willingness to try new things will ensure a great experience.

What to bring?

– Work gloves

– Closed toed shoes, and clothes you don’t mind getting dirty in

– Water and/or snack (we have a fridge and microwave available)

We need volunteers Monday through Saturday mornings from 9am-1pm, and afternoons 1pm-5pm. Or stay for the full day! Register as a volunteer online at www.pdxrestore.org or contact Janell at 503.517.0720 to get on our schedule. Bring your friends! Sign up an entire group!

We hope to see you at the ReStore!

via Rumble at the Warehouse | CNRG.

Supply Chain Project Administrator – Habitat for Humanity International ReStores | Habitat for Humanity Intl

Habitat for Humanity International HFHI is recruiting a dedicated professional to fill the role of Supply Chain Project Administrator for its ReStore program in Atlanta, Georgia. ReStores sell new and gently-used home improvement goods, furniture, home accessories, building materials and appliances to the public at a fraction of the retail price. The proceeds are then used by a local Habitat for Humanity affiliate or by Habitat for Humanity International to help build and renovate more homes and communities.

via Supply Chain Project Administrator – Habitat for Humanity International ReStores | Habitat for Humanity Intl.