Tag Archives: San Francisco

A Reclaimed Wood Installation Sourced From the San Francisco Dump by Barbara Holmes | Colossal

Using sourced and reclaimed materials is at the heart of Holmes’ practice, carefully transforming the untidy elements into aesthetically crafted pieces. “At first glance my work my appear oddly familiar or utilitarian,” says Holmes in her artist statement, “but on closer inspection of the materials and their re-contextualization, the viewer may need to reconsider initial ideas as they discover more layers of meaning.”

Source: A Reclaimed Wood Installation Sourced From the San Francisco Dump by Barbara Holmes | Colossal

See What Artists-in-Residence at a Trash Dump Create | Atlas Obscura

The idea originated with artist and environmentalist Jo Hanson. After creating her own art with trash and assisting with campaigns such as city-wide street sweepings, in the late 1980s Hanson approached Recology about a program where artists could reuse materials from the dump. At around the same time, San Francisco was implementing new recycling laws, and looking for ways to raise awareness about waste. The artist-in-residence program fit that bill.

Source: See What Artists-in-Residence at a Trash Dump Create | Atlas Obscura

Host to Super Bowl 50, Levi’s Stadium is the sustainable arena of the future | SI.com

Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, Calif.

For LEED certification, the scorecards include decisions made when building—such as the 49ers’ embrace of local public transit, use of recycled materials from the old Moffett Field and sourcing of material locally

Source: Host to Super Bowl 50, Levi’s Stadium is the sustainable arena of the future | SI.com

One man’s trash is an opportunity for a professor to create art | Golden Gate Xpress

Michael Arcega collects thrown away materials into a shopping cart to be used to create art in his studio at Recology SF Saturday, Feb. 21, 2015. (Drake Newkirk / Xpress)Michael Arcega collects thrown away materials into a shopping cart to be used to create art in his studio at Recology SF Saturday, Feb. 21, 2015. (Drake Newkirk / Xpress)

The residency program will provide the sculptor and installation artists with a studio, a monthly stipend and unlimited access to the dump area for materials. In addition to the time dedicated to the program, Arcega will also teach three classes at SF State and has recently debuted three pieces in the on-campus exhibit Hydarchy: Power, Globalization and the Sea.

via One man’s trash is an opportunity for a professor to create art | Golden Gate Xpress.

Jury finds Recology cheated in waste diversion bonus program | SF Politics

The primary way this occurred, according to attorney David Anton, involved misclassifying demolition and construction waste. Under state law, ground up raw construction material that is labeled as “fines” can legally be used to cover up the top of a landfill – in order to prevent pests, fires, and odors, for example. When construction waste is ground up and used this way, it counts as “alternative daily cover” – like a layer of frosting on a giant cake of garbage – and strangely enough, the state allows waste disposal companies to count that frosting as “diverted waste” even though it’s actually part of the landfill.

The lawsuit claimed that Recology tried to count a great many tons of its construction and demolition waste as “fines” when in reality it should have been labeled just plain garbage, because the tons of stuff that they were shipping to the Solano County landfill wasn’t being processed to a fine enough grade to comply with state requirements for what constitutes “fines.”

via Jury finds Recology cheated in waste diversion bonus program | SF Politics.

The Cannery, San Francisco | Athena Sustainable Materials Institute

Most structures only last 35-60 years, particularly in a region concerned with seismic safety. With structural elements dating back to 1967, The Cannery had reached its time horizon for expected replacement of the structure. Rather than simply replacing the building, however, the design team considered how much in environmental resources was already invested in the original structure and its multiple retrofits. The client sought to preserve not only the aspects of the original structure, but also the evidence that told its story as the region’s first example of adaptive reuse. Reuse of existing structure is one of the most significant ways to reduce the embodied environmental impacts of construction.

EcoCalculator Results:

The EcoCalculator results indicated that preserving The Cannery’s structure was equivalent to:

  • saving enough energy to power 500 homes for one year;

  • saving the amount of carbon it would take nearly 380,000 trees over 10 years to sequester; and

  • avoiding an amount of waste that would fill 2.2 football fields

via The Cannery, San Francisco | Athena Sustainable Materials Institute.

Recology SF • Artist in Residence Program

The Art of Recology - Exhibit at SFO

The Art of Recology opened March 16 in the United Terminal at the San Francisco International Airport. This exhibition celebrates the Recology San Francisco Artist in Residence Program and presents over one-hundred pieces made by forty-five artists. All of the works on display were made in the art studio at the San Francisco Solid Waste Transfer and Recycling Facility and constructed from materials the artists scavenged from the Public Disposal and Recycling Area (or what we affectionately refer to as “the dump”).

Founded in 1990, the Recology San Francisco Artist in Residence Program promotes recycling and reuse, and encourages people to reflect on how their consumption practices affect the environment. Artworks in the exhibition were selected by airport curators and will be on display through October 27, 2013. The Art of Recology is located past security so can only be viewed by those traveling, but if you find yourself flying United soon, allow some extra time to view this very special exhibition.

via Recology SF • Artist in Residence Program.