Tag Archives: Sara Badiali

Decon and Reuse Expo ’17: Portland’s landmark deconstruction ordinance takes center stage | KATU

“If we can save that amount of space in the landfills, that means that we’re not generating emissions from the decaying of those materials,” said expo organizer and re-use consultant, Sara Badiali. “The environmental impact is astounding.”

Source: Decon and Reuse Expo ’17: Portland’s landmark deconstruction ordinance takes center stage | KATU

Why Portland Requires Deconstruction for its Oldest Homes – CityLab

Rebuilding Center Photo

Dismantling a home carefully enough that its components can be reused is a more intricate process than demolition. It takes longer and requires more labor in place of machinery. At first glance, the labor costs make deconstruction more expensive than demolition. In most cases, though, the tax benefits more than pay for deconstruction—the value of salvaged materials, which can be donated for tax credit or saved for reuse in later projects, is typically thousands of dollars greater than the cost difference between deconstruction and demolition. “When you don’t have to use energy to create a project, you’re just harvesting, it’s almost like free money,” Badiali says. “By simply dismantling something, you’re creating a product. You’re adding value.”

Source: Why Portland Requires Deconstruction for its Oldest Homes – CityLab

For Sale: Industrial Mechanical Table – Portland, Oregon

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A very sweet rolling table for sale. Cast aluminum base, adjustable height (2 ft at the tallest), 16″ x 22″ top. This is a mix of glue-lam top with a 1960’s drafting chair bottom. The handle is the chair’s adjustment knob. $300. Contact reclamationnews @ gmail for more information.

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For Sale: Modern Chandelier Made From Reclaimed Rose Parade Float- Portland, Oregon

Two years ago I worked as a welder fabricating the Rose Parade Floats for the City of Portland, Oregon. This chandelier is made from a support armature that was eventually cut out of the float structure. It makes a perfect modern hanging light. Own a piece of Portland reclaimed history!

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Reclaimed steel armature from the City of Portland’s Rose Parade float. Edison bulb, cloth covered wire, dimmer switch. $225. Contact reclamationnews @ gmail for purchase information.

 

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Deconstruction vs. Demolition: Portland, Oregon’s Potential for Groundbreaking Health and Safety Studies in Building Demolition – By Sara Badiali

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Deconstruction vs. Demolition: Portland, Oregon’s Potential for Groundbreaking Health and Safety Studies in Building Demolition – By Sara Badiali

Demolition: deliberate destruction of a building or other structure.[1]

Deconstruction: the systematic dismantling of a building in order to recover the maximum amount of materials for reuse and recycling.[2]

 

The City of Portland is poised to contribute to the study of health and safety in building removal. The Deconstruction Ordinance will take effect starting October 2016. The ordinance outlines single family homes built before 1916 must be deconstructed for material reuse.  Deconstructing buildings will greatly lower greenhouse gas emissions and material disposal in landfills over traditional demolition.  Deconstruction not only provides access to unique materials but also viable building materials that would otherwise go to waste. The Deconstruction Ordinance will provide the first ever opportunity for side by side comparisons of demolition verses building deconstruction for environmental health and safety measures.

Portland presents an environment of blistering-fast paced development, houses upwards of one-hundred years old, and established demolition and deconstruction companies. Residential interest in environmental health and safety is at an all-time high due to incidents pertaining to lead and radon, and unprecedented housing demolition. Portland is also home to multiple academic organizations specializing in environmental health issues, health sciences, urban planning, and architecture.

By hosting studies of building removals, new information will lead to a better understanding of hazardous material reductions and ultimately best practices. Consequently research in Portland could be the catalyst for laws regulating more than standards for lead dust fall, but also heavy metals, asbestos, and water contamination in demolition practices.

 

Hazardous Particulates in Buildings

When a building is demolished, the mechanical action of crushing creates particulates of dust from the building’s materials. These particulates enter the air and spread throughout the environment.  Machines repeatedly driving over the worksite further circulate these particulates. Atmospheric conditions like wind can exacerbate the spread of dust.

There are currently no U.S. federal regulatory standards for lead dust fall, exterior settled dust, or dust-suppression methods in housing demolition.[3] There are also very few demolition dust fall related studies, or inquiries into whether hand dismantling structures (deconstruction) reduces the spread of potentially hazardous air particulates.

Lead and asbestos are by far the most studied and discussed of hazardous materials attributed to buildings. Asbestos is proven to cause the fatal diseases asbestosis, pleural disease, and lung cancer. According to a 2011 survey by U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control, over 37 million homes have lead based paint somewhere in the building. [4] The majority of hazardous lead is in homes built before 1978.

One study indicates that 37 billion square feet of building components are coated with deteriorated lead-based paint.[5] A 2008 study of lead exposures in U.S. children found that “Exposure to lead can occur from many pathways and sources, but housing is the main pathway of exposure in the U.S., accounting for approximately 70% of childhood lead poisoning cases.”[6]

There are other less well known potential health hazards in buildings.  Arsenic and heavy metals like chromium, copper, iron, and manganese are harmful to humans. These heavy metals are thought to be from use of pressure treated wood manufactured before 2003.  Mercury is a common toxic waste present in buildings, including gas pressure regulators, boiler heating systems, and thermostats. According to the Massachusetts Water Resource Authority “The amount of mercury present in one mercury thermometer is enough to pollute 5 million gallons of water.”[7] That is the capacity to contaminate a 20-acre lake with enough mercury to result in a fish consumption warning, says Wastecap of Massachusetts. Benzene, a chemical related to natural gas, is also found harmful to humans. Environmental dust is especially problematic for people who suffer from asthma.

Continue reading Deconstruction vs. Demolition: Portland, Oregon’s Potential for Groundbreaking Health and Safety Studies in Building Demolition – By Sara Badiali

BMRA News June 2016

On October 31 of this year Portland plans to implement a policy requiring deconstruction on any demolition of a house or duplex which was built in 1916 or earlier.  Pre-1917 houses currently account for approximately one-third of the 300+ demolitions taking place in the city each year.

A number of BMRA members have been involved with the effort to develop, pass and implement a deconstruction ordinance in Portland.  BMRA member Sara Badiali, of the Reclamation Administration and also a member of the City of Portland Deconstruction Advisory Group touts the pioneering aspect of this effort:

“The City of Portland, Oregon’s Deconstruction Ordinance is unique as the very first in the world to lawfully require dismantling buildings for reuse. Its historical precedence lays the foundation for other laws to be created to close the loop in our building material waste streams. I am honored to be on the team that created the Deconstruction Ordinance and I am thrilled for the future of the planet.”

Source: BMRA News June 2016

Deconstruction Works Vermont & the Reclamation Administration in Portland!

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Erich Kruger of Deconstruction Works Vermont paid a visit to Schoolhouse Electric in Portland last weekend. Hanging in style with Sara Badiali of Reclamation Administration.

Posted by The Reclamation Administration on Tuesday, April 5, 2016

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Erich Kruger at Schoolhouse Electric in Portland, Oregon.

Deconstruction Resolution Unanimously Passes Portland City Council – Sara Badiali

For over a year I’ve been meeting with a group of Portlanders working on writing language to create a deconstruction resolution.

My fellow Deconstruction Advisory Group participants encompass salvage, deconstruction, builders, neighborhood coalitions, Portland City and Metro Regional Government representatives. We were effectively trying to do something that’s never been done before.

Many states and municipalities across the country have ordinances requiring construction and demolition debris to be diverted from landfills. Not one has ever used the language or required diversion to be done by deconstructing buildings.

Since 2011 I have been researching and posting on building material reuse. From my research I have created resource pages on Policies and Ordinances across the country. In five years I have never found deconstruction in any of the rules regarding waste diversion in the United States. Or Canada. Or Europe.

On Wednesday, February 17, 2016 – Portland made history!

Portland City Council approved the resolution that directs the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability to develop code language that requires projects seeking a demolition permit of a house or duplex to fully deconstruct that structure if it was built before 1916 or is a designated historic resource.

DAG Testimony

Sara Badiali Creator of the Reclamation Administration and Deconstruction Advisory Group Consultant, testifying for the passing of Portland’s Deconstruction Resolution.

 

“Today Portland became the first city in the country to ensure that the act of taking down the homes of our past has the least amount of impact on the environment and the surrounding neighbors,” said Portland Mayor Charlie Hales. “Keeping valuable materials out of the landfill reduces carbon emissions and gives people affordable options for fixing up their homes.”

Presentation by the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability. To see Sara Badiali testifying for Portland Mayor Charlie Hales start video at 2:45.

The resolution language and Portland’s Bureau of Planning and Sustainability press release.

Stay tuned for the article about my experience on the Deconstruction Advisory Group and testifying before Portland’s City Council. Congratulations Portland!

Reuse Centers: Ways to Optimize Partnerships – Sara Badiali

One of the benefits of starting the Reclamation Administration is that I get to see how reuse centers optimize partnerships within the community.  Like churches or pubs, reuse centers can be a pivotal gathering place. If done well, the physical detritus of the community flows through a reuse center. Neighbors stop and talk with each other over finds and projects, suggestions are made and advice is given. I’ve seen reuse centers inspire creativity that transcend individual projects and develop into community initiatives.  Material with history motivates people to collaborate and build both projects and relationships.

Continue reading Reuse Centers: Ways to Optimize Partnerships – Sara Badiali

REUSE CENTERS: WAYS TO OPTIMIZE PARTNERSHIPS SERIES – ARTIST RESIDENCIES– BY SARA BADIALI

Artist Residencies is the final installment of articles about partnership optimization for the building material reuse community. See the entire series here

 

Reuse Centers: Ways to Optimize Partnerships Series

Artist Residencies

Art starts with raw materials and reuse centers are brimming with materials waiting to be reused.  Thus, reuse centers are filled with unrealized art.  What better way to showcase this potential than with an artist in residency?  By sponsoring an artist to commit acts of creativity, reuse centers can show off inventory and potential use in unique ways.  Recology is an artist in residency program at the Recology Solid Waste and Transfer Station in San Francisco, California. This program has sponsored over 100 artists since 1990.  Artists have unlimited access to inventory and even studio space provided by the transfer station.  Artists are required to speak to elementary school students and tour groups about using reclaimed materials and there is a two day gala event for the unveiling of the finished artwork.

There are unlimited ways to partner with artists.  The key is to find a good balance between experience, education, and the deliverable product.  Some residency programs require the artist to donate the end piece to a gallery for permanent display.  Other organizations hold an auction for the final product and use the proceeds for funding purposes.  The unveiling, gala, or celebration for art is an important event.  Reuse centers are utilitarian by nature, so to express the value of a beautiful creation make sure the party is off site and fancy.

Fine art is one type of reuse possibility, but reuse centers that carry wood will benefit from craftspeople who make custom furniture.  For many people the desirability of having a custom piece of furniture by an artist, is a chance to own an heirloom.  Reclaimed wood from a local landmark or historical building that is crafted into furniture, is a functional piece of history. When done beautifully these pieces really are unique, valuable for both their craft and their connection to place and time.

Partnering with artists and craftspeople in residency programs can facilitate unlimited opportunities.  The benefits of partnership include supporting local craftsmen and burgeoning artists, but also funding opportunities.  Art organizations have loyal patrons because many people feel strongly about supporting the arts. Reuse centers are in the excellent position of supplying materials for art, but also education in both craft and reuse.  An organization that combines collaboration with artists, providing education, environmental benefits, and supporting the local economy in jobs and goods, is a great investment for funders.  In many cases a reuse center can adopt an arts program with little administrative or policy changes, and the value is limitless.

 

 Consulting

The Reclamation Administration is a great databank for reuse centers collaborative partnerships.  There are a few that stand out as particularly successful models.  Partnerships are an excellent way to get exposure, marketing, materials, and revenue, while supporting the local community.

Contact me if you are interested in learning more on collaborative partnerships for your reuse outlet.

REUSE CENTERS: WAYS TO OPTIMIZE PARTNERSHIPS SERIES – Business Evaluations – by Sara Badiali

Business Evaluations is the fourth of in a series of five articles about partnership optimization for the building material reuse community. Starting with Reuse Contests , Curriculum Design & House as Showcase

 

Reuse Centers: Ways to Optimize Partnerships Series

One of the benefits of starting the Reclamation Administration is that I get to see how reuse centers optimize partnerships within the community. Business Evaluations is really about partnering with educational institutions within the community.

 

Business Evaluations

Partnering with educational institutions can go beyond the medium of reuse.  Colleges and Universities frequently have business schools within them.  The genius of students are that they are constantly problem solving as it is the educational environment. Teachers and professors are often on the look-out for projects that enrich their curriculum with real businesses that are facing actual issues.  Reuse centers, nonprofit or private, offer a unique case study opportunity. The fluctuating markets of reclaimed material, selling unusual and often unique products, and the volume of goods that are incomplete in some way, are amazing problems to solve.  An executive director’s nightmare, can be a business class’s educational goldmine. The return for opening up your business to a student evaluation, is a plethora of sharpened minds let loose to collect information, review data, debate, postulate, and innovate. It is their job to provide information and ideas that typically a business would never have time or money to do.

These types of projects are most effective if the reuse center is open and helpful in providing data. For example in Ohio the Tristate Habitat for Humanity opened its doors to business students from Miami University.  The Strategy Works teams shared statistical data about ReStore buyers, donors, and potential corporate partners.  Each team provided researched suggestions on how to more effectively market the ReStore.

All partnerships with schools and students benefit from the perspective that they aren’t cheap labor, but professionals in pre-recruitment stage. If utilizing undergraduate students does not appeal, then consider contacting graduate programs. However, living in Portland, Oregon and constantly working with students, my experience is that creative gold comes from minds unfettered by established practices or “the norm”. If open to it, learn from what companies like Widen & Kennedy and Nike already know, that when supported there is no limit to what young creatives can do for a business.  Reuse centers can use educational partnerships in other ways like marketing, organizational development, strategic planning, and board recruitment for starters.  The benefits of collaborating with local educational institutions are limitless, and the stewardship of young minds is good business.

 

Next Up: Artist Residencies

The Reclamation Administration is a great databank for reuse centers collaborative partnerships. There are a few that stand out as particularly successful models. Partnerships are an excellent way to get exposure, marketing, materials, and revenue, while supporting the local community.

Stay tuned for the next article in the series on partnering with artists to realize the amazing potential of reuse.

REUSE CENTERS: WAYS TO OPTIMIZE PARTNERSHIPS SERIES – HOUSE AS SHOWCASE– BY SARA BADIALI

House as Showcase is the third of in a series of five articles about partnership optimization for the building material reuse community. Reuse Contests & Curriculum Design started the series. 

 

Reuse Centers: Ways to Optimize Partnerships Series

One of the benefits of starting the Reclamation Administration is that I get to see how reuse centers optimize partnerships within the community. The whole house showcase is one of my favorite collaboration projects.

House as Showcase

For many people “seeing” the potential in a material is challenging.  Piles of hardware or stacks of used lighting components can look like junk.  Retail outlets rarely show inventory without a display area. But reuse centers can be at the mercy of volumes of materials and few workers to organize them. The result is unappealing piles of product on shelves or the floor.  Those of us who can see the beauty beyond the mess find this experience bittersweet.  There are more interesting finds for us, but a person can only buy so much.  Then there is the heartache of seeing all that interesting material languish unused.

One reuse center tackled the issue of material languish by using inventory to decorate an entire house.  Some reuse centers have display areas or even design rooms within their stores.  But a lack of space can inhibit this option.  By using a donated vacant house as a showroom, the reuse center sold items literally off the walls.  Lighting fixtures, outlet covers, doors, sinks, paneling, windows, and many other random household items are displayed for sale in the home.  Walking through the house, customers are able to see the items in context.  Customers could better “see” the material’s potential for their own home. They could also buy the item off the wall hardware and all.

The display house’s interior is ever evolving, which would make an interesting photography project. More importantly the material is moving, being sold to create space for more reusable components.  Possibly the most important element is that people are inspired to use reclaimed materials.  That the transformation of junk to viable product is as simple as displaying it in the right context.  The other benefits of using an entire house is the attraction of interior design to reuse.  The opportunity to stage materials is a great way for staff to show off their artistic skills. There is untapped potential in the artists and craftspeople that work in the reuse industry, especially in the reuse centers (after all, they work with the material every day).

Obtaining an entire house for the purposes of displaying reclaimed materials, is not viable for every reuse center. However, the materials are coming from somewhere and in some cases it’s a house that is being demolished.  There is widespread urban blight in this country. Many municipalities are struggling with abandoned houses and unfortunately entire neighborhoods are being demolished.  Actively using abandoned buildings is an effective way of keeping vandals and crime in check.  There is potential for partnerships in this area if you can just “see” it.

Next Up: Business Evaluations

The Reclamation Administration is a great databank for reuse centers collaborative partnerships. There are a few that stand out as particularly successful models. Partnerships are an excellent way to get exposure, marketing, materials, and revenue, while supporting the local community.

Stay tuned for the next article in the series on partnering with educational institutions to go beyond the medium of reuse.

Reuse Centers: Ways to Optimize Partnerships Series – Curriculum Design – by Sara Badiali

Curriculum Design is the second of in a series of five articles about partnership optimization for the building material reuse community. 

 

Reuse Centers: Ways to Optimize Partnerships Series

One of the benefits of starting the Reclamation Administration is that I get to see how reuse centers optimize partnerships within the community.

Like churches or pubs, reuse centers can be a pivotal gathering place. If done well, the physical detritus of the community flows through a reuse center. Neighbors stop and talk with each other over finds and projects, suggestions are made and advice is given. I’ve seen reuse centers inspire creativity that transcend individual projects and develop into community initiatives.  Material with history motivates people to collaborate and build both projects and relationships.

 

Curriculum Design

Schools and reuse centers are natural partners.  Before leaving the reuse center I where I worked I was collaborating with interior design professor Amanda Davis of Portland Community College.  We were developing a curriculum for students on how to design with reclaimed materials.  We were focusing on the importance of scouting materials before designing, and frequenting reuse centers to establish types of inventories.

In other words, to design well with reclaimed materials go early and often, to get to know your reuse center well. Then match your client’s needs based on your material expertise.

For example tile was always abundant where I worked, so a student could discuss saving money with a frugal client, or selling a mosaic style to a creative client.  Her design class would be required to spend half the day volunteering at the reuse center to handle the materials and see how they are categorized.  The rest of the day would be spent in a design charrette working with the materials they handled earlier in the day.

This keeps the students on site at the center learning about materials.  It also benefits the center not only with volunteers for half a day, but with a generation of designers confident in reuse.

Educational immersion is an excellent learning technique, which produces exceptional results in students.  The effect is professionals returning to the business they are emotionally bonded to, in this case the reuse center.

The students from Amanda Davis’s design class went on to win the design competition at the 2013 Portland Home and Garden using reclaimed materials.

 

Next Up: House as Showcase

The Reclamation Administration is a great databank for reuse centers collaborative partnerships.  There are a few that stand out as particularly successful models.  Partnerships are an excellent way to get exposure, marketing, materials, and revenue, while supporting the local community.

Stay tuned for the next article in the series on partnering with empty or blighted houses to showcase hard to display materials.

Reuse Centers: Ways to Optimize Partnerships Series – Reuse Contests – by Sara Badiali

Reuse Contests is the first of in a series of five articles about partnership optimization for the building material reuse community. 

 

Reuse Centers: Ways to Optimize Partnerships Series

One of the benefits of starting the Reclamation Administration is that I get to see how reuse centers optimize partnerships within the community.

Like churches or pubs, reuse centers can be a pivotal gathering place. If done well, the physical detritus of the community flows through a reuse center. Neighbors stop and talk with each other over finds and projects, suggestions are made and advice is given. I’ve seen reuse centers inspire creativity that transcend individual projects and develop into community initiatives.  Material with history motivates people to collaborate and build both projects and relationships.

 

Reuse Contests

Reuse Contests are growing in popularity.  Over the years some contests have developed from community gatherings into grand events.  Entire galas have grown out of simple DIY challenges.  Nothing gets the competitive juices flowing like media coverage and a party.

The Post-Gazette and Construction Junction joined forces and created the Reuse Inspiration Contest. People sent in photos of their home renovation projects and three won tickets to the Big Pour, a beer festival sponsored by a brewery in Pittsburg.  The reuse center Construction Junction, the Post-Gazette and the brewery attracted lots of publicity but also provided the community with inspiration in creative reuse.

Other events like these include catwalks complete with fashions made from recycled materials.  CART’M, a reuse and recycling center on the Oregon coast, presents the TRASHION show every year to a sold out crowd of hundreds.

These contests have expanded into categories from structures that are integrated into buildings, to fine art displayed in local galleries. A community in Arizona established a yearly event called The Big Heap, complete with reuse categories and a market. The festival is so big now that it is a music venue for national bands and is covered by HGTV.  Reuse contests are an effective platform for jumping off into greater reuse possibilities.

 

Next Up: Curriculum Design

The Reclamation Administration is a great databank for reuse centers collaborative partnerships.  There are a few that stand out as particularly successful models.  Partnerships are an excellent way to get exposure, marketing, materials, and revenue, while supporting the local community.

Stay tuned for the next article in the series on partnering with educational institutions to create reuse curriculum.

The Reclamation Administration Evolution | Indiegogo

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The Reclamation Administration  Contribute Here!

Since 2011 the RA has been a primary site for news and research on building material waste prevention. Posts on projects, programs, policy, people and the amazing progress made in reclaiming beautiful materials from going to waste!

  • Over 3,000 links to inspiring stories, collaboration, and design
  • Resource pages on reuse centers, regional policy, reuse design links
  • Original content articles, featured artists, announcements, and internships

The building material reuse community is a thriving growing industry of professionals and policy-makers who are changing the world for the better! The Reclamation Administration is uniting this diverse community through daily news.

The Reclamation Administration Needs to Increase Capacity!

This free site needs capital to evolve. We need $5,000 for:

  • Publication of our First Book on reclaimed designs by the talented craftspeople featured over the years
  • New Logo and Marketing campaign to reach more readers
  • Additional supply & demand Resource Pages to connect people to materials
  • To become a Limited Liability Corporation: The Reclamation Administration, LLC

If the funding goal isn’t reached, The Reclamation Administration will continue to provide these services but at a much slower pace. There is a high demand for inspirational news on reclaimed building materials – and we want to answer the call!

The Impact

The RA is an ongoing source of inspiration for design, policy, collaboration, business, environmental issues, job creation, and education.  The RA features daily information highlighting the “Triple Bottom Line” model of sustainability.  The RA provides daily news that People, Planet, and Profit are synergistic when reclaiming building materials.

  • Social change in the form of job creation, and the establishment of Deconstruction as a Trade Skill
  •  Environmental and ecological impact through reducing the waste stream and limiting the need for consuming raw materials
  •  Financial profit from creating a new industry in harvesting and producing products from reclaimed building materials

Over 100,000 people have visited the RA since it’s creation with an average of 100 new visitors a day. Over 400 readers are dedicated followers.

Risks & Challenges

The RA has been operating as a blog for over three years.  The new funds will go to registering The Reclamation Administration as a LLC. The RA is a Social Entrepreneurship – a business with a mission and we have a lot more to learn!

Here’s what we have so far:

  • Over three years of support in consistent & reliable information on building material reuse
  • Partnerships with national organizations, businesses, craftspeople, and government
  • Small business graduate through Mercy Corps North West

Other Ways You Can Help

If you can’t contribute financially send us your news instead!  We are always looking to spread the word and hear people’s stories on reuse. Send our campaign to someone you know, take a moment to pass it on – thank you.

  • Get the word out about The Reclamation Administration
  • Use the Indiegogo share tools!

via The Reclamation Administration Evolution | Indiegogo.