Tag Archives: structure reuse

“Upcycling” Assets: Planning for Regenerative Growth – Urban Land Magazine

Barrie Barton of Right Angle Studios speaking at right at a ULI Australia event in Sydney.

“We’re all in this together. So, stop thinking about the people that are just in our direct industry and [think of] all of the brands and all of the incredibly smart, creative people that you can work with to get together with the same objectives. We’re not that different, really. And there are some really exciting opportunities with people outside of the property bubble—to misuse that phrase—not the least of which is our citizens.”

Source: “Upcycling” Assets: Planning for Regenerative Growth – Urban Land Magazine

Houston reservoir reborn as public space, canvas for art – Houston Chronicle

In this Friday, Dec. 16, 2016, photo, the exhibition of an abstract-video installation called “Rain” by Venezuelan artist Magdalena Fernández is projected inside a former water reservoir dubbed the “Cistern”.

It’s the latest example of efforts by U.S. cities — including Atlanta; Buffalo, New York; Philadelphia; San Francisco; and Washington, D.C. — to repurpose abandoned and dilapidated pieces of infrastructure as public spaces. Urban planners see the preservation of historic buildings and other structures as essential in creating the kinds of communities people want to live in, said Stephanie Meeks, president and CEO of the Washington, D.C.-based National Trust for Historic Preservation.

Source: Houston reservoir reborn as public space, canvas for art – Houston Chronicle

Family Home in an Aircraft Carrier – 1800s Cottage Located in an Industrial Carrier

But Kalkin wasn’t going to give up on his dream to live in a unique house, instead, he decided to encase the home inside a 27-foot-high and 33-foot-wide aircraft hangar, which provided more space and helped preserve the original clapboard cottage.

Source: Family Home in an Aircraft Carrier – 1800s Cottage Located in an Industrial Carrier

Hoover-Mason Trestle wins regional Urban Land Institute award | LVB

The Hoover-Mason Trestle is a one-third mile long elevated walkway in South Side Bethlehem./Photo courtesy ULI Philadelphia.

Completed last fall, the $15.4 million Hoover-Mason Trestle is a one-third mile long elevated walkway that links South Side Bethlehem properties such as the Sands Casino Resort-Bethlehem and SteelStacks.

Source: Hoover-Mason Trestle wins regional Urban Land Institute award | LVB

The Rise of Hercules | The Argonaut Newspaper

The Ratkovich Company converted formerly derelict Hughes Aircraft buildings into enviable creative office space for 72andSunny (pre-renovation photos courtesy of the L.A. Conservancy Archives; post-renovation photos courtesy of 72andSunny Los Angeles)    Photo credit: Laura Heffington

The Ratkovich Company converted formerly derelict Hughes Aircraft buildings into enviable creative office space for 72andSunny (pre-renovation photos courtesy of the L.A. Conservancy Archives; post-renovation photos courtesy of 72andSunny Los Angeles) Photo credit: Laura Heffington

The Los Angeles Conservancy’s 90-minute “From Hughes to Hercules” tours offer rare access to the massive wooden hangar where the reclusive business tycoon built his Spruce Goose (aka the H-4 Hercules), the former aviation warehouse that is now YouTube Space L.A. and two former administrative buildings that now house the digital advertising firm 72andSunny.

via The Rise of Hercules | The Argonaut Newspaper.

Fort Snelling’s historic Upper Post to be transformed into workforce housing

The approximately $100 million project will be financed through a combination of Low-Income Housing Tax Credits, Federal and State Historic Tax Credits, and other sources. “These tax credits make the project feasible from our perspective,” Condas says. Dominium specializes in affordable and workforce housing, as well as the adaptive reuse of historic structures.

“Projects like this one take an incredible investment from a construction cost standpoint, in order to make them work,” Condas says. “Without that stack of tax credits, the project wouldn’t be do-able.”

via Fort Snelling’s historic Upper Post to be transformed into workforce housing.

This Crumbling Building in Detroit Wants to be Saved | Commercial Property Executive

Stone Soap Building – Detroit

In a continuing effort to save or repurpose a long list of blighted buildings across Detroit, the City and the Detroit Brownfield Redevelopment Authority (DBRA) are looking for proposals for the adaptive reuse of a crumbling industrial property in the East Riverfront District.

via This Crumbling Building in Detroit Wants to be Saved | Commercial Property Executive.

Adaptive re-use: A blueprint on how to profit

© 2015 Richard Montgomery 4.28.01 PM.jpg(Photo: Richard Montgomery)

Why does adaptive reuse attract investors? Investors and operators have several motives for jumping in. The primary motive is profit and gain. The idea of recycling, preservation or history is additional motivation. Another driver may be your creative side emerging and visualizing the project as a learning experience or adding another arrow to the business knowledge quiver. Regardless of the driver, determining profitably is the single most important factor.

via Adaptive re-use: A blueprint on how to profit.

Adaptive-reuse project means makeover for West Barracks | The Columbian

The long-vacant Infantry Barracks at Fort Vancouver will be renovated into studio and one-bedroom apartments over the next year as part of an $8.3 million “adaptive reuse” project involving four buildings. (Natalie Behring/The Columbian)

The city of Vancouver is funding the $8.3 million project with a combination of state grants, revenue generated from operation of Fort Vancouver property and city bonds, including “mini-bonds” that citizens can purchase for $500 to $10,000.

“Anything we can do to preserve and restore those buildings, we should do that,” Mayor Pro Tem Larry Smith told the city council at last Monday’s workshop. “This is probably one of the greatest assets of our community.”

via Adaptive-reuse project means makeover for West Barracks | The Columbian.

Chapels and churches upcycled into houses for sale | Property | Life & Style | Daily Express

Three-bed room house with red brick

Once an electrical substation at RAF Bicester, this is now a three-bedroom house up for sale

You may think this [upcycling] is just an American word for recycling but it was German engineer Reiner Pilz who invented the term in 1994 when complaining about EU directives that led to Germany’s disused buildings being totally demolished.

Building projects requiring reclaimed materials had to be imported from the UK. Since then upcycling has become a clarion call for Europe’s Green movement, although in Britain we also upcycle old properties just because we like them.

Robin Chatwin, head of Savills South West London, says: “We first saw abandoned former industrial buildings being converted into homes on a significant scale in the 1980s, which started with the vast old warehouses along the Thames around the old working docks.

“The trend for turning these buildings from industrial to residential use probably began slightly earlier in New York but it was a real departure in how we approached unconventional spaces and how they could be re-configured to be lived in.

“Over the years we’ve become very good at it.

via Chapels and churches upcycled into houses for sale | Property | Life & Style | Daily Express.

Iconic High Line Park in NYC Opens Final Section To Public | Inhabitat

Chelsea residents and High Line neighbors Joshua David and Robert Hammond founded Friends of The High Line in 1999 with the goal of restoring the elevated, dilapidated train tracks to public use and turning the decaying infrastructure into an urban oasis for the community. Despite a mayor who tried to destroy the High Line (Guiliani), and a complete lack of interest at first from politicians and city officials, Friends of the High Line managed to gradually convince the community and ultimately the powers-that-be that this historic structure needed to be saved and turned into a park, and the first section of the restored park opened in 2009.

via PHOTOS: Iconic High Line Park in NYC Opens Final Section To Public | Inhabitat – Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building.

Boston/SF News | Articles and Archives | PCA and Beacon Communities Complete Adaptive Reuse of National Historic Landmark

According to David Chilinski of Prellwitz Chilinski Associates, the solution required a new look at the property and its potential. “We saw the same obstacles to reusing these buildings that others encountered. The community wanted to see the architecture and the incredible history it represents preserved and blended back into the town fabric. So we looked for ways to open up and unlock all creative possibilities both inside the structures and on the grounds of the property.”

via Boston/SF News | Articles and Archives | PCA and Beacon Communities Complete Adaptive Reuse of National Historic Landmark.

Adaptive reuse: Gas stations remade into trendy restaurants – CNN.com

Chef Ben Poremba renovated a Standard Oil gas station built in the 1930s into a wine bar and restaurant in St. Louis, Missouri. Olio opened in November 2012.

“Gas stations are almost always on corner sites, they have good visibility and great accessibility, so they make great locations for restaurants,” said Ellen Dunham-Jones, a professor of architecture and urban design at the Georgia Institute of Technology and co-author of “Retrofitting Suburbia: Urban Design Solutions for Redesigning Suburbs.”

The building appealed to Red Truck Bakery owner Brian Noyes because it was centrally located in the heart of Warrenton. Even in the 1920s, the gas station was a place for locals to meet and socialize, he said.

via Adaptive reuse: Gas stations remade into trendy restaurants – CNN.com.

Yale woman makes a project of rescuing old buildings – Richmond Times Dispatch: Home And Garden

Yale woman makes a project of rescuing old buildings

Her two-story home was built around a house that once belonged to her paternal great-grandparents. She moved the dilapidated 18th-century structure — fireplace and all — to her property in the mid-1990s and with the blood, sweat and tears of a good friend and family, added onto the house. They used wood and materials from other rundown buildings to make the modern home it is today.

Yale woman makes a project of rescuing old buildings

 

via Yale woman makes a project of rescuing old buildings – Richmond Times Dispatch: Home And Garden.

‘Unique’ development in Block 3 | The Rock River Times

For your inspiration consideration.

Urban Equity Properties, LLC, closed on the purchase of 324-330 E. State St., Tuesday, Feb. 19, from long-time owner Dennis Clement. UEP President Justin Fern said he plans state-of-the-art, market-rate lofts for the upper floors and a restaurant with an accordion storefront that will be very unique. (Urban Equity Property, LLC, photo)

via ‘Unique’ development in Block 3 | The Rock River Times.

Church Bells To Doorbells: 8 Churches Turned Into Homes (Page 1) | WebUrbanist

WebUrbanist article on Churches to Homes renovations.

Church-House-Renovations-Montage

Churches are some of society’s most stylistically beautiful buildings. A large amount of building design comes down to functionality and affordability, so churches, built for a spiritual purpose rather than a materialistic one, tend to include elements that highlight beauty and detail. When these churches grow old, or are purchased, they can then be renovated into amazing houses that uniquely introduce religious elements into a pedestrian environment.

via Church Bells To Doorbells: 8 Churches Turned Into Homes (Page 1) | WebUrbanist.

Defrosting a Building: Otherworldly Icescapes Inside a Historic Chicago Cold Storage Facility | Colossal

In some ways Colossal Art and Visual Ingenuity is our hero. It’s such a great site. Go see them and the rest of this article.

Defrosting a Building: Otherworldly Icescapes Inside a Historic Chicago Cold Storage Facility ice history Chicago architecture

For nine decades Fulton Market Cold Storage Company operated in Chicago’s meatpacking district with a full ten stories of freezing storage situated close to major railways. Last summer the company decided it was time to start fresh in a state-of-the-art facility outside of Chicago, so the building was sold to SRAM, a bike component manufacturer who will use the space for its global headquarters. Architects Perkins + Will were hired to help convert the ice-encrusted space into a new, modernized office building and were also tasked with the most epic refrigerator defrost in history.

Defrosting a Building: Otherworldly Icescapes Inside a Historic Chicago Cold Storage Facility ice history Chicago architecture

Defrosting a Building: Otherworldly Icescapes Inside a Historic Chicago Cold Storage Facility ice history Chicago architecture

Defrosting a Building: Otherworldly Icescapes Inside a Historic Chicago Cold Storage Facility ice history Chicago architecture

Defrosting a Building: Otherworldly Icescapes Inside a Historic Chicago Cold Storage Facility ice history Chicago architecture

Photos by Gary Robert Photography

via Defrosting a Building: Otherworldly Icescapes Inside a Historic Chicago Cold Storage Facility | Colossal.

How a Missile Silo Became the Most Difficult Interior Decorating Job Ever | People & Places | Smithsonian Magazine

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So began a massive restoration project that continues today. Over three-week visits each spring and fall, Michael has gradually turned the silo control center into a living space that comes close to, or at least pays homage to, its historical state. In September, a regional architectural heritage organization gave him a historical preservation award for his “long-term stewardship” and “sensitivity to the structure’s original purpose and period.”

 

Alexander Michael

Read the entire article via How a Missile Silo Became the Most Difficult Interior Decorating Job Ever | People & Places | Smithsonian Magazine.

Recycled Concrete Bunkers in Albania Get New Uses : TreeHugger

For 41 years Albania was a very poor and scarey place. Under Enver Hoxha’s paranoid dictatorship, it was an isolated country in constant fear of attack. Between 1967 and 1986 he had 750,000 concrete bunkers built: that’s one for every four Albanians. All in preparation for an enemy that never came.

Many of them still exist. To the younger generation of Albanians they are not a bitter legacy, instead “the bunkers are our cathedrals” and they are recycling them for use as an arts centre, tattoo parlour, nightclubs, storage facilities, hostel and restaurants.

Go see it via Recycled Concrete Bunkers in Albania Get New Uses : TreeHugger.

Skyscraper Squatters: Lessons from Ad Hoc Vertical Slums | WebUrbanist

Take abandoned office towers without occupants, on the one hand, while people all around sleeping on the streets, on the other. One deserted structure in downtown Caracas provides a fascinating case study in this recipe for spontaneous urban reuse, its 45 floors now inhabited by over 3000 people.

Don’t miss the rest of the article via Skyscraper Squatters: Lessons from Ad Hoc Vertical Slums | WebUrbanist.

Rustic Ruins to Modern Residences: 3 Barn Renovations | WebUrbanist

Aging barns are often left to simply deteriorate, the stone crumbling, weathered wooden siding falling to the ground.  But in their dramatic A-frame silhouettes and wide-open simplicity, some architects see the potential for a transformation into a modern, livable residential space. These three barn renovations rescued or recalled structures that were near complete destruction, preserving their history while giving them a greater purpose.

via Rustic Ruins to Modern Residences: 3 Barn Renovations | WebUrbanist.

Radio Royaal is a Gorgeous New Restuarant in an Old Philips Power Plant in the Netherlands | Inhabitat – Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building

An old power plant that used to provide Philips with energy to run their factories has been beautifully transformed into a spacious restaurant called Radio Royaal. Located at Eindhoven’s Strijp-S area—aka The Forbidden City—this gorgeous eatery has plenty of space for hungry visitors within its 14,000 square-foot area. An initiative of local entrepreneurs Bart Oosterveer and Niels Wouters, it officially opened its doors last week.

via Radio Royaal is a Gorgeous New Restuarant in an Old Philips Power Plant in the Netherlands | Inhabitat – Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building.

Which Portland-area buildings do you wish were restaurants? | OregonLive.com

While traveling around the Portland area looking for new places to eat, I often see empty buildings that just scream out “restaurant” not literally.It might be a derelict building on the corner with great bones, or a vacant structure sandwiched between two thriving businesses in an up-and-coming neighborhood.

Either way, you probably have one near you, and you probably know what Im talking about.Just for fun, here are four Portland buildings that, over the years, Ive wished some deep-pocketed restaurateur would transform into a restaurant or bar.

phoenix.jpg

1. The Phoenix pharmacy building

Owner Robert Froman, who also runs the Stove Palace and its must-see website just down Foster from the Phoenix, once thought of opening a stove museum in this dramatic two-story brick building.

But, with a lot of work, the suspect structure — it currently sports a “U,” for “unsafe,” from Portland Fire & Rescue — would make a fantastic restaurant or bar, and a landmark eastern gateway for the still up-and-coming “SoFo” neighborhood.

History: According to Froman’s “Foster the Phoenix” website, which seeks to rehabilitate the building, the Phoenix Pharmacy was constructed in 1922 here at the corner of Southeast Foster Road and 67th Avenue and “in its day it was the Eastside’s ‘largest suburban drug store.'”

Thoughts: With a flatiron shape and lovely wrap-around windows on the first floor, the Phoenix would make a fantastic place to eat or drink.

 

 

 

 

TERRELL_BRANDON_BUILDING.JPG

2. The 8212 Club

This vacant beige building might not look like much right now, but it has two things in its favor: a prime location in the middle of another up-and-coming neighborhood and a starring role in one of Portland’s most infamous scandals.

Smack-dab between kid-friendly cafe Posies and the Multnomah County Library’s new Kenton branch, this building, at 8212 and 8216 N. Denver Ave., has loads of square footage and big windows looking out on recently renovated North Denver Avenue. But as the neighborhood has blossomed around it — just check out Kenton’s fun Friday afternoon farmers market half a block away — the building, owned by former NBA star Terrell Brandon, has remained empty.

History: Here’s where things get interesting. In 1955, Multnomah County Sheriff Terry Schrunk led a raid of the 8212 Club, a gambling den, pinball parlor and bar in the upstairs of the building. Schrunk’s deputies arrested several drunks, but didn’t shut the place down because — according to testimony given to the special senate committee on labor and racketeering led by U.S. Sen. John McLellan and Chief Counsel Robert Kennedy — the bar’s owner gave Schrunk a $500 bribe.

The testimony threatened to derail Schrunk’s political career at its nascent point. Kennedy even came to Portland to testify against him. But jurors quickly moved to acquit, and Schrunk, who had just won a hard-fought mayoral battle, went on to become one of Portland’s longest serving mayors. His son, Michael Schrunk, is the current Multnomah County District Attorney.

Thoughts: It’s easy to imagine a Toro Bravo-like restaurant on the ground floor and a Secret Society-esque bar (“The 8212 Club,” perhaps?) serving classic cocktails in the old gambling hall upstairs.

 

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3. Portland Fire & Rescue Station 2

This firehouse at the western end of the Steel Bridge hasn’t played dormitory for firefighters for decades. In fact, it displays the same Portland Fire & Rescue “U” sign as the Phoenix pharmacy above.

But, between the century-old architecture and the potential for river views, the two-story brick building at 510 N.W. Third Ave. sure has a lot of character.

History: Portland Fire & Rescue’s website has a historical photo of the building, and lists it as “present at this location” from 1912 to 1950. According to Brian K. Johnson and Don Porth’s book, “Portland Fire & Rescue,” the station’s amphibious vehicles, known as “ducks,” were used for search and rescue operations during the Vanport flood of 1948.

Thoughts: Not long ago, I thought Fire Station 2 would make a great rehab project for the McMenamin brothers. But with new tracks carrying MAX trains to and from the Greyhound station a short stumble from the building’s front door, it might be a dangerous place to serve beer and wine.

 

 

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4. The Ladd Carriage House

Ask and you shall receive!

Years ago, even when this building was a run-down shell, it still seemed like it might make a great bar or restaurant some day.

Now, nearly 130 years old, the structure, a former carriage garage for Portland business and civic leader William Ladd, is set to become a new restaurant and lounge.

As The Oregonian first reported Tuesday, the carriage house, meticulously restored under Carleton Hart Architecture project manager Paul Falsetto, will soon be home to Raven & Rose, a British-style gastropub with plenty of Northwest flavor.

History: Built in the 1880s, the building was converted to shops and offices in 1926 and was remodeled as a law firm in 1972. In 2007, the then-vacant building was placed on blocks and moved several blocks west during construction on the Ladd Tower condominiums (also pictured).

Thoughts: Among other tantalizing details from co-owner Lisa Mygrant in Tuesday’s story was word that Raven & Rose’s interior was being inspired, in part, by the Brunel, a gorgeous pub in London’s Battersea neighborhood that closed in 2010.

— Michael Russell   via Which Portland-area buildings do you wish were restaurants? | OregonLive.com.

Underground Art: The Repurposed Oil Tanks at Tate Modern | WebUrbanist

Once a power station, now a repository for some of the world’s most innovative art: the expansion of the Tate Modern art museum in London is repurposing industrial infrastructure in surprising ways. And while the bulk of it is still under construction, set to open in 2016, the museum has opened the doors to the first phase. Herzog & de Meuron has transformed the enormous oil tanks of the power station into underground galleries.

via Underground Art: The Repurposed Oil Tanks at Tate Modern | WebUrbanist.

Abandoned Gas Station Becomes a Restaurant : TreeHugger

It’s called the Filling Station: how appropriate. It used to be a shabby and abandoned gas station in London’s King’s Cross. And suddenly it’s a stunning restaurant that does not want to be called a pop-up. Mainly because it is meant to be a semi-permanent building that will be there for two years before new homes are built in the rapidly gentrifying area.

via Abandoned Gas Station Becomes a Restaurant : TreeHugger.

Reuse Building Materials and Give Old Supplies New Life | AsanteGeorge.com

reuse building materialsDuring a conversation with a friend of mine who lives in the southern US, I learned that her cousin built her entire home out of materials she collected from old buildings. By salvaging and reusing materials, my friend’s cousin was able to construct her own home on a very strict budget.

Ever the green artist, this thought intrigued and excited me. Not only is it eco-friendly, but with rent and mortgage costs increasing, the thought that it is possible to reuse building materials to construct a comfortable home was a revelation.

Why Reuse Building Materials?

Using reclaimed materials is one of the most sustainable ways to acquire materials for a home or building. Not only is it conservative on the pocket book, but reusing building materials saves resources, conserves landfill space, and prevents deforestation.

Preserving Useful Supplies

In order to resuse building materials, a building must be deconstructed in a way that maintains the integrity of the supplies. This process is different from demolition in which a site is cleared quickly and by any means. Deconstruction takes into account a building’s life cycle and aims to give materials a new life once the building is no longer in use.

Commonly reused building materials include wood, fixtures, sinks, bricks, windows, and cement. Many proponents of recycled materials claim the reused supplies add a sense of history and art to a new structure. It may also provide an opportunity to reuse building materials that were made in an era where standards of craftsmanship were very high. However, construction materials aren’t the only things recycled into homes and structures.

One Person’s Trash is Another Person’s…Temple?

Structures made from reused materials come in many beautiful shapes and forms. There are modern homes made from shipping containers, a Buddhist temple in Thailand made from over one million beer bottles, Aluminum cans upcylced into aluminum siding, and silos made into comfortable prefab homes. All of these structures make something beautiful and functional out of, well, garbage.

Old barns and condemned buildings are full of value if they are responsibly deconstructed and reused. Bottles and cans that fill so many trash and recycling bins can become an affordable and beautiful home or greenhouse. Reuse building material; it’s sustainable and artistic, and it allows quality construction supplies to live again.

via Reuse Building Materials and Give Old Supplies New Life | AsanteGeorge.com.

Prefab and Preservation, Together At Last at Dovecote Studios : TreeHugger

Activists in historic preservation often are asked “when is a building too far gone to save?” British architects Haworth Tompkins demonstrate that when there is a will, the answer is never. At Aldeburgh Music’s ‘creative campus’ is based at Snape Maltings in Suffolk, Archdaily describes how “Nestled within the shell of an abandoned building, the firm responded to the existing conditions with a touch of sensitivity, uniting the old structure with the new aesthetic.

Read the whole article via Prefab and Preservation, Together At Last at Dovecote Studios : TreeHugger.

Failed Nuclear Power Plant Transformed Into Amusement Park : TreeHugger

Amusement parks can seem banal if you’re fed up of overpriced food, long lines and not-so-great rides. But this extraordinary amusement park in Germany has an edge over its competitors — it’s built out of an abandoned nuclear power plant.

The immense cooling tower houses a swing ride, while its outside walls have been converted to a 130 foot tall climbing wall. In addition, there are more traditional rides like a carousel, merry-go-round and Ferris wheel, attracting approximately 600,000 visitors each year.

Wunderland Kalkar/Promo image

Located near Kalkar, Germany, this “Wunderland” park is a great example of adaptive reuse that could also solve the problem of what to do with the country’s nuclear power sites as it plans to completely phase out nuclear power by 2022.

According to the Daily Mail, this nuclear power plant was never used, though it was supposed to be the world’s most hi-tech nuclear power plant when it was constructed in 1972. But after many protests and the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, the multi-million dollar project was cancelled 12 years later, with a Dutch businessman stepping in and buying the plant in 1995.

harry_nl/CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

The park now boasts several hundred hotel rooms, bars and restaurants (operated out of the plant itself it seems), dozens of rides, a museum, miniature golf and tennis courts. But is it safe? Well, the Daily Mail quotes a park spokeswoman as saying:

People come from all over the world because they are completely fascinated by the park. It’s totally unique and that’s what draws people in. It’s not something you see every day. Some people worry it’s unsafe but it is 100 per cent safe. Because the nuclear power station has never been put to use, the whole complex is guaranteed free of radiation.

Good to know; thrill-seekers can find out for themselves at Wunderland Kalkar(website).

via Failed Nuclear Power Plant Transformed Into Amusement Park : TreeHugger.

Giving old concrete buildings new life – Journal of Commerce

The Pacific Palisades twin concrete towers are being refurbished with a new exterior and interior to give the structures, built in the 60s, new life.

Vancouver architect Wing Leung calls it giving old concrete buildings new life.

Others call it renewing or recycling buildings.

While heritage buildings are often recycled, there is an emerging trend to reuse concrete buildings constructed in the 1960s and 70s.

“It will become more and more prominent in the future,” said Leung, who is spearheading the redesign of one of the largest such projects in Vancouver – the Pacific Palisades twin towers.

This trend is one that architects like Leung said he sees catching on as larger cities, such as Vancouver, become more concerned with sustainability and the environmental impact of removing large concrete structures from congested city areas.

It’s just not Vancouver that’s thinking this way.

In Toronto, the Mayor’s Tower Renewal project is a major effort looking at up to 1,000 buildings from that era and attempting to upgrade these older highrise residential concrete structures to become more sustainable.

A 2011 University of Toronto symposium on tower recycling focused on the Mayor’s project and the worldwide impact of this kind of activity.

The Pacific Palisades Hotel twin towers started out as apartments in 1966, but then became a 233-unit hotel and apartment complex.

They were recently acquired by Austeville Properties for conversion back to rental units.

“This is a very enlightened client,” said Leung, adding the work could have been phased in.

But, Austeville decided to strip the exterior and gut the interiors.

“It was also an interesting project,” he said.

Removing some finishes restored the era’s post-modernist design on exterior lower faces.

Continue reading Giving old concrete buildings new life – Journal of Commerce

The green dividend from reusing older buildings | Kaid Benfield’s Blog | Switchboard, from NRDC

adaptive reuse of older building in the Pearl District, Portland (by: Patrick Dirden, creative commons license)

We already know that, in many cases, retaining older buildings – especially those of architectural or historic character – can strengthen the enduring legacy and enjoyment of a community.  But is it good for the environment?  Lots of people think so, including architect Carl Elefante, who coined the wonderful phrase, “the greenest building is one that is already built,” because you don’t have to use environmental resources in constructing its replacement.  (I have added that the phrase is most likely to be true if the building is in the right context.)  But, especially considering the advanced green technology available for new construction, do the facts back that up?

The Preservation Green Lab of the National Trust for Historic Preservation has just released a detailed new study (available here) directly addressing these important questions.  The study concludes that it can take between 10 and 80 years for a new, energy-efficient building to overcome, through more efficient operations, the negative energy and climate change impacts caused in the construction process.  The study cautions, however, that there are environmental resources expended in rehabbing an older building as well; care must be taken in the selection of materials used in the rehabilitation or adaptation of older buildings, since “the benefits of reuse can be reduced or negated based on the type and quantity of materials selected for a reuse project.”

The Sears Powerhouse, Chicago, being used as a party venue (by: Laurie Chipps, creative commons license)

Read the rest of the article at  The green dividend from reusing older buildings | Kaid Benfield’s Blog | Switchboard, from NRDC.

The South End :: Newberry Hall renovation preserves history, goes green

newberry_hall_1

Newberry Hall renovation preserves history, goes green

Historic nursing school, residence hall turned into energy-efficient studio housing

By AUDREY LAFOREST | The South End

Updated: 01/26/12 7:29pm

Another piece of Detroit history was saved through the residential renovation projects in Midtown. Newberry Hall, located at 100 E. Willis St., was renewed with attention to historic detail but also updated with energy-efficient features. It is now accepting leasing applications for those interested in moving into the 28-unit apartment building.

“We wanted to save a neighborhood landmark. It’s really a beautiful building that sits on a major street across from the hospital (Detroit Medical Center),” said Lis Knibbe, a principal at Quinn Evans Architects.

Newberry Hall originally opened in 1898 as a school for nurses and residence hall. Helen Hardy Newberry advocated for the proper training of nurses, so she commissioned the building, which was built by Elijah E. Myers – who also designed the capitol building in Lansing.

Quinn Evans Architects and development and finance firm Zachary and Associates worked together to decide how to combine the old with the new.

“We tried to restore the important architectural features of the building, so we restored the exterior and also the beautiful entry lobby,” Knibbe said. “The improvements we put in are pretty contemporary, but sensitive to the historic style.”

The original building featured a training area in the basement, a large social hall near the entrance where nurses could entertain guests and small dormitory-style rooms with one big marble-lined bathroom shared by the nurses.

“We salvaged the marble from the bathroom, and it’s now going to be used as the countertop for a tea shop,” said Diane Van Buren, a consultant at Zachary and Associates.

Van Buren worked on much of the deconstruction side of the renovation, including removing historical material so that it could be preserved rather than thrown in a landfill.

“A lot of the walls had to come down, but there were very valuable materials there, so we helped bring in a job training program to deconstruct those important pieces and store them,” Van Buren said.

Continue reading The South End :: Newberry Hall renovation preserves history, goes green

Pacific NW | Seattle’s old buildings: Opportunities, not obstacles | Seattle Times Newspaper

Seattle’s old buildings: Opportunities, not obstacles

A jazzy "streamline moderne" storefront spruced up the post-World War II commercial district of Seattle's Roosevelt neighborhood.

Seattle’s old buildings should be maintained and upgraded as the city evolves, says writer Lawrence Kreisman, program director of Historic Seattle. Reusing these old buildings, he says, is one of the best ways to improve the environment. It’s much greener than building green from scratch. And it can make good business sense.

via Pacific NW | Seattle’s old buildings: Opportunities, not obstacles | Seattle Times Newspaper.

Re.Wind Camping « 2012Architecten

 

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Cutover pieces of windmill wings are used to create all the camping facilities like compost-toilet, sun-shower, solar-cooker  and compost-heated outside bath.The potential of the site as well as the potential of the material are used, resulting in a positive impact on the environment. Only by reusing the windmill blades about 30.000kg of CO2 emissions are saved from being released into the atmosphere.

 

via Re.Wind Camping « 2012Architecten.