Tag Archives: Sweden

2018 Crackedpots Holiday Shop — crackedpots – Sara Badiali

Crackedpots Holiday Shop encourages shoppers to reconsider the disposable nature of the season with thoughtful alternative gifts made from reclaimed materials.Holiday Pop UpSIGN.png

Crackedpots (crackedpots.org) is a small environmental art nonprofit whose mission is waste reduction through reuse. This year this humble organization has quietly made a stunning leap forward for the reuse industry, by opening a retail store in a major mall in Portland, Oregon.

The Crackedpots Holiday Shop carries local, handcrafted products that are exclusively made from a minimum of 80% reclaimed materials. Recovered waste materials are transformed into furniture, lighting, fixtures, clothing, accessories, fine art, and craft. Items are made from salvaged metal, glass, textiles, jewelry, assemblage, wood and plastics.

By selling only reclaimed products in a major shopping center for the holidays, Crackedpots is mainstreaming the reuse market by leaps and bounds. The ReTuna Återbruksgalleria mall in Eskilstuna, Sweden is the only other known mall retail outlet pioneering exclusively reclaimed goods.

This unique organization has less than ten employees, working part time. The operating budget is under $100,000. They have three programs, the annual Reuse Art Show, the GLEAN art show, and ReClaim It! salvage store.

This summer’s 19th Annual Reuse Art Show converted over 20 tons of waste into retail products.

By Sara Badiali

Source: 2018 Crackedpots Holiday Shop — crackedpots

Importing garbage for energy is good business for Sweden on Vimeo

 

 

Everyone produces waste, and the Swedes are no different. It’s what they do with it that is unusual. Sweden recycles and sorts its waste so efficiently that less than 1 percent ends up in landfills. But perhaps even more interesting, and somewhat controversial, is that Sweden burns about as much household waste as it recycles, over 2 million tons, and converts this to energy. But even with this amount of domestic waste, the country’s 32 waste-to energy (WTE) incineration plants can handle even more. And when Sweden runs out of its own garbage, it offers a service to the rest of garbage-bloated Europe: importing excess waste from other countries.

Importing garbage for energy is good business for Sweden from Sweden on Vimeo.