Tag Archives: warehouse conversion

The hottest new condo trend is reusing old buildings | New York Post

A model interior at Six Cortlandt Alley — a five-unit condo developed by Ryan Kaplan that’s set within a former factory. Halstead Property Development Marketing

“We actually have several locations within the building where you can see the original fabric of the property,” says Ryan Kaplan, a partner at Imperial. “We wanted to remind people from the moment they step into the building and up until they get to their apartment that there is a history here that can’t be replicated in a new building.”

Source: The hottest new condo trend is reusing old buildings | New York Post

Ansarada by Those Architects

“The Ansarada fit-out poses a legitimate response to this condition through its adaptive re-use of a century old wool store in Sydney’s historic rocks district, expressing its inherent beauty by juxtaposing a highly adaptable and sophisticated work environment for the companies most important asset, its people.”

via Ansarada by Those Architects.

From Warehouse to Wonderful: Double-Duty London Home | Designs & Ideas on Dornob

We are seeing a lot of warehouse adaptive reuse projects lately. Here is a lovely one from South London on Dornob.

half home half studio london home

Price’s concept was to more or less insert a home into the existing building by dividing the space in half. Since the mezzanine provided a natural separation of the vertical space, that side of the warehouse was naturally to become the living area.

london warehouse conversion bathroom bedroom

via From Warehouse to Wonderful: Double-Duty London Home | Designs & Ideas on Dornob.

Firm Lands Redevelopment Project on Brooklyn Waterfront – WSJ.com

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A developer has been chosen to turn a collection of deserted Civil War-era warehouses along the waterfront at Brooklyn Bridge Park into a new office, dining and shopping destination.

Nearly 80% of the roughly 380,000 square feet of space in the old warehouses will be used for offices. The developer is also in talks with the Brooklyn Historical Society to use about 3,200 square feet of space for exhibitions.

via Firm Lands Redevelopment Project on Brooklyn Waterfront – WSJ.com.

Warehouse to party place

Warehouse to party place

“I looked at it and said, This building is butt-ugly, ” recalls Bender, standing outside the Whistle Stop Depot, which has an expansive porch, corrugated tin walls colorful with rust marks, and oversized spoked wheels in the front, waiting to become incorporated into the décor of the now-dusty front yard area.

Bender, a retired teacher who moved here from Northern California, saw potential in the former Ralphs Moving & Storage warehouse. If there were a tower rising from the center of the roof, she thought, she could fall in love with it. Her partner, retired carpenter Carlton Dewey White, said, “I can do that.”

So she bought it.

Warehouse to party place

Warehouse to party place

via Warehouse to party place.

Boing Boing: Revolving bookcase/room divider

The UnWaste Bookcase was jointly created by Ben Milbourne, Leyla Acaroglu and David Waterworth to act as a loft apartment room-divider that could be opened and spun completely around, depending on the needs of the residents. Its a very clever solution:

A split-level open plan warehouse conversion in Melbourne’s CBD needed a flexible solution to divide the open space into 2 rooms, while retaining the option of keeping the larger combined space when needed; an answer that would allow for light and airflow throughout the spaces but also a division between living and sleeping areas. The James Bond inspired solution involves a 4.6 metre high by 3.8m wide rotating library allowing books to be stored and accessed from either side and maximising air-flow and light when needed by simply pushing on the corner to allow for full 360 degree rotation.

Producing the least environmental impact possible was paramount with this project. Conventional ‘virgin’ MDF, Timber or Melamine all came with unacceptable environmental impacts, leading to an impasse that threatened to derail the project. The solution came via the collaboration with David Waterworth who specialises in reclaimed and recycled materials in his designs. Reclaimed plywood from construction site hoardings the temporary barriers at the edge of construction sites were sourced and the material’s unique characteristics of posters, weathering, graffiti and mismatched paints was incorporated into the design. The ply was sealed with natural beeswax, and with the construction processes minimising off-cut waste, 30 sheets of plywood were saved from landfill for this project further limiting its environmental impact.

via Boing Boing.