Tag Archives: Preservation Green Lab

What the History of Diocletian’s Palace Can Teach Us About Adaptive Reuse – Design – The Atlantic Cities

How will the city of tomorrow adapt and reuse the city of today? I don’t think we ask that question broadly enough, and our day-to-day, property-specific incrementalism can easily overshoot the greatest lessons from history. A hometown case in point transported me from Seattle to Croatia for inspiration about why we should think beyond limited geographies, time frames and lifetimes when we discuss urban redevelopment options.

Recently, the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Seattle-based Preservation Green Lab made urbanist media headlines (including Emily Badger’s Atlantic Cities story) with a report stating the environmental benefits of green retrofits of historic buildings, as compared to new, state-of-the-art, energy-efficient construction. A local church restored as townhouses joined the list of intriguing Seattle adaptive reuse projects typical of national trends.

Almost simultaneously, Seattle Times columnist Nicole Brodeur described a protest-free goodbye to a neighborhood icon in my Seattle neighborhood. A 112-year-old repair garage and offices (demolished last Friday) will soon become the nostalgically named Pike Station, comprised of new townhouses, complete with a courtyard and intermixed retail.

Read the entire amazing article here via What the History of Diocletian’s Palace Can Teach Us About Adaptive Reuse – Design – The Atlantic Cities.