Concerns and Questions Mount Over Demolition Appeal Process | The Portland Chronicle

“It’s possible to have a neighborhood under this section of code with very few financial resources, and then we have a case here where there’s a neighborhood with a significant amount of resources and we get an entirely different result,” he said. “From a diversity, from a fairness, from a just general perception of government I think, that raises the possibility of having different decisions based solely on economics.”

Source: Concerns and Questions Mount Over Demolition Appeal Process | The Portland Chronicle

Iowa father, daughter who share passion for refurbishing will be at Junkstock – Omaha.com: Living

ANDERA PHOTOGRAPHY
Dawn Backers and dad, Dan Klimesh, own NEI Architectural Salvage & Skräp Work. The duo will be at Junkstock this weekend.

“He has taught me everything from the different woods and architectural elements we salvage to using the tools in the shop,” she said. “It’s been an exciting adventure and I feel like I am always learning something new. Dad is always supporting me in my ideas and dreams of what I can create next.”

Source: Iowa father, daughter who share passion for refurbishing will be at Junkstock – Omaha.com: Living

Crews begin demolishing North Portland home that may date to 1870s | KATU

Crews began demolishing this home at 9134 N. Edison in Portland on Monday. (KATU Photo)

“They built this house, but this house was down on the river,” said Tanya March, who claims to know the home’s history. “We know it was moved up the hill in 1904.” The home had been added to over the years, perhaps hiding any historical uniqueness.

Source: Crews begin demolishing North Portland home that may date to 1870s | KATU

A Surprising Fact About Medieval Europeans: They Recycled | Atlas Obscura

Two leaves from The Mirror of Human Salvation. These pages were reused as a wrapper for a book at some later time. The ghosting of the book it adorned can still be seen in the dark, abraded portion that spans the two pages. (Image: The Walters Art Museum/CC-0)

According to Fleming, the British raided Roman ruins for building materials  to the extent that until the 11th century, Christian churches in Britain were constructed mostly from scavenged Roman materials. This assertion has been verified through architectural surveys, one of which discovered over 300 churches around London built from Roman ruins. Similarly, tile, ceramics, pottery, and iron were all reclaimed and repurposed.

Source: A Surprising Fact About Medieval Europeans: They Recycled | Atlas Obscura

Texans rethink acceptance of tiny house movement growing in Spur, TX | Inhabitat

In a bid to reverse the long population decline, Spur began marketing its relaxed building codes, low land prices, and access to ultra-high-speed fiber Internet to tiny house pioneers. While the plan to turn the town into a tiny house mecca appears to have worked—over 60 lots have been sold for around $500 a piece, and 40 more lots are being freed up for sale—talks of plans for yurts, off-grid dwellings, and underground earth homes unnerved some locals.

Source: Texans rethink acceptance of tiny house movement growing in Spur, TX | Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Shelter, footwear, composting and packaging designs get cradle-to-cradle recognition

The Huba self-sufficient compact mountain shelter, designed by Malgorzata Blachnicka and Michal Holcer, won the Best Use of Aluminum category. It was chosen for its good design, functional use of sustainable materials and its potential use in other housing contexts (such as disaster recovery).

“We launched the Cradle to Cradle Product Design Challenge to help the global design community approach the issue of limited global resources as an opportunity for product innovation,” says president of the Cradle to Cradle Products Institute Lewis Perkins. “Designers have a pivotal role to play in driving long-term solutions that circumvent the concept of waste in favor of materials that can remain in a perpetual cycle of use and reuse.”

Source: Shelter, footwear, composting and packaging designs get cradle-to-cradle recognition

A Haven for New York Relics Saved From the Trash Heap. In Connecticut. – The New York Times

Evan Blum, 59, has filled a complex of buildings in Ivoryton, Conn., with architectural artifacts, many of them recovered from New York City buildings. Credit Christopher Capozziello for The New York Times.

Mr. Blum has been filling the buildings over the past few years with newly rescued items as well as overflow from an inventory acquired over the decades. Inside is a sea of ornamental fixtures and furnishings that have been pulled from buildings being demolished or renovated — and most of it is for sale.

Source: A Haven for New York Relics Saved From the Trash Heap. In Connecticut. – The New York Times

How one man is making a career out of foraging old Maine wood — Homestead — Bangor Daily News — BDN Maine

Ryan Deane

No board was purchased at a big-box lumber yard. Each was curated, piece by piece, from barns on their last legs, farmsteads on the edge of collapse and historic town structures minutes from the wrecking ball. The past is etched into each scuff and splinter.

Source: How one man is making a career out of foraging old Maine wood — Homestead — Bangor Daily News — BDN Maine

ReHistoric Wood sees third year of increased sales > Spokane Journal of Business

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Bruce Johnson, co-owner of ReHistoric Wood Products LLC, says a majority of the company’s inventory comes from old barns, mills, sheds, and small outbuildings. -—LeAnn Bjerken

“The market for reclaimed wood is only getting larger,” says Johnson. “In the last three years, we’ve tripled our sales volume.” ReHistoric Wood Products finds and purchases older wooden buildings that are no longer in use, dismantles them, and sells the pieces for use in other projects. “Sourcing is a very important part of our business,” says Johnson. “The majority of the wood we use comes from old barns, mills, sheds, or smaller outbuildings.”

Source: ReHistoric Wood sees third year of increased sales > Spokane Journal of Business

Video: A 95-Year-Old Bungalow Gets Moved From Hollywood To Los Feliz In The Middle Of The Night: LAist

(Photo courtesy of Andrew Raitt)

The developers, who were looking to build an apartment complex, had purchased the two homes next door and were dead-set on getting the Raitts to sell. At first, Andrew and Christine were uninterested. They had a new baby. They loved their place. The 1,400-square-foot bungalow was home. But, as Andrew said, “[the developer] just kept bugging us and bugging us and bugging us.” They weren’t particularly interested in selling, until the persistent developer came back with an offer that “would make a lot of sense for us, you know, change our life,” as Andrew put it. Still, the Raitts “were just so emotionally attached to the house.” Finally, Andrew said, they told the developer they would sell under one condition: if they could keep the house.

Source: Video: A 95-Year-Old Bungalow Gets Moved From Hollywood To Los Feliz In The Middle Of The Night: LAist

Google Is Moving Into The Spruce Goose’s Massive Hangar: LAist

The hangar that used to house the Spruce Goose (Photo by Mike Hume via the LAist Featured Photos pool on Flickr)

The hangar is massive, with an area of 319,000-square-feet. It had to be huge because The Spruce Goose had eight propeller engines and a wingspan longer than a football field, according to The History Channel. Google is expected to use the hangar as an expansion of its L.A. offices. There is no word about a move-in date, or what the company will do with the adjacent land it purchased in 2014.

Source: Google Is Moving Into The Spruce Goose’s Massive Hangar: LAist

BMRA News June 2016

On October 31 of this year Portland plans to implement a policy requiring deconstruction on any demolition of a house or duplex which was built in 1916 or earlier.  Pre-1917 houses currently account for approximately one-third of the 300+ demolitions taking place in the city each year.

A number of BMRA members have been involved with the effort to develop, pass and implement a deconstruction ordinance in Portland.  BMRA member Sara Badiali, of the Reclamation Administration and also a member of the City of Portland Deconstruction Advisory Group touts the pioneering aspect of this effort:

“The City of Portland, Oregon’s Deconstruction Ordinance is unique as the very first in the world to lawfully require dismantling buildings for reuse. Its historical precedence lays the foundation for other laws to be created to close the loop in our building material waste streams. I am honored to be on the team that created the Deconstruction Ordinance and I am thrilled for the future of the planet.”

Source: BMRA News June 2016

Excess Dale Forest Service buildings to be sold for salvage – Local News –

 

The Umatilla National Forest will begin accepting bids June 10 through June 30 for the removal of 10 single-family or duplex homes, one garage and one office outbuilding, according to a Forest Service press release.

These 12 buildings constitute Phase One of the process to sell or transfer the 25 buildings located at the Dale Administrative Site. This site once served as headquarters for the Dale Ranger District. In 1984, the Dale Ranger District combined with the Ukiah Ranger District to form the North Fork John Day Ranger District.

 Additional information including pictures, building descriptions, bid forms, disclosure notices and removal instructions is available at any Umatilla National Forest Office or on the forest website at fs.usda.gov/umatilla.

Source: Excess Dale Forest Service buildings to be sold for salvage – Local News –

Turkish Pavilion houses a huge ship made from 4 tons of reused materials and discarded furniture | Inhabitat 

The large ship measures 30 meters (98 feet) and weighs four tons. It was built from more than 500 pieces of reused materials, including seven kilometers (4.6 miles) of steel cable, wooden moulds, discarded furniture, signboards and boats found on site.

A large vessel called “a baştarda” built from waste materials in Istanbul was transported to Venice and installed at the pavilion as a symbol of cultural connections and transformation of borders.

Source: Turkish Pavilion houses a huge ship made from 4 tons of reused materials and discarded furniture | Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Upcycling movement inspires local businesses in Sudbury – Sudbury – CBC News

David Kelvin and his fiancee Keshia Brushett are owners of Urban Designs, a company that uses old and unwanted wood to make custom-made furniture. (Samantha Lui/CBC )

“A lot of people are just interested in what we do and what we’re going to do with the wood,” he said. “There’s a lot of people who want their barns down and they don’t have the money or time to take care of it. For them, it’s a favour. We get something out of it and they get something out of it.”

Source: Upcycling movement inspires local businesses in Sudbury – Sudbury – CBC News

Event: ReUse-apalooza

ReUse-apalooza – Photo: Provided

This sustainable soirée brings customers, designers and local leaders together to celebrate the power of renewability. Featuring light bites, My Nose Turns Red circus performers and entertainment by Sexy Time Live Band Karaoke, ReUse-apalooza is the annual fundraiser of Building Value, a nonprofit that salvages reusable building materials for public sale.

Source: Event: ReUse-apalooza

Farmer finds fit with salvage business

Wood Salvage

Aaron Williams stores reclaimed barnwood for his business, Willow Architectural Salvage. He says for every one barn where the wood is salvaged, another 100 are burned or bulldozed. Photos courtesy Aaron Williams.

He has been growing the Willow Architectural Salvage business ever since. “It still allows me to farm,” says Williams, who grows corn and soybeans near Waverly about 30 miles south of Springfield. “Being a farmer, I understand farm families. It’s a good fit,” he says of the business. HOWEVER, DESPITE the popularity of barn wood today, a surprising amount of barns are wasted. “For every one that we salvage about 100 get burned or bulldozed,” Williams says. Some of those barns were built 150 years ago for livestock and when equipment was smaller. Such buildings are expensive to maintain.

Source: Farmer finds fit with salvage business

Green Building: Why Waste a Window? — Environmental Protection

Introduced more than30 years ago, window film today is engineered using advanced technology to deliver energy savings similar to low-e windows, yet at a fraction of what replacement windows cost. Just like new windows and doors, window film is rated by the NFRC (National Fenestration Rating Council), so homeowners and property managers can be sure of the benefits. For single-family homes, window film installation costs can range from $4 to $11 per square foot, depending on the location and type of window film installed, and the process can be completed in one or two days, without a major disruption in use of the rooms where the windows are located.

Source: Green Building: Why Waste a Window? — Environmental Protection

WEF Report Outlines 30 Steps to a Circular Construction Industry | Sustainable Brands

Image credit: Till Krech/Wikimedia Commons

The WEF claims that less than a third of all construction and demolition waste is recovered and reused, resulting in billions of tonnes of materials being wasted. In the United States, about 40 percent of solid waste derives from construction and demolition.“Such waste involves a significant loss of valuable minerals, metals and organic materials,” wrote the WEF’s Keith Beene. “With such quantities involved, even small improvements in the way the construction industry works will have significant impacts on sustainability.”

Source: WEF Report Outlines 30 Steps to a Circular Construction Industry | Sustainable Brands

Massachusetts student Sarah Hastings has been told home is illegal | Daily Mail Online

Sarah Hastings has been living in her 190-square-foot home on wheels, dubbed Rhizhome, on a parcel owned by another couple for the last year.

‘Through my interdisciplinary education at Mount Holyoke College, I brainstormed a way to do this; by graduation I had competed the design and construction of my own mobile tiny home and received high honors in Architectural Studies for my work.  ‘I sourced all of my material from salvage yards, craigslist, and local businesses within a 200 mile radius of my building site.  ‘Local professionals, friends, and my father contributed their skills and knowledge to my project, which ensured a safe and informed home.’

Sarah Hastings (pictured) was given a day to move out. She says she’ll try to find another location for her house

Source: Massachusetts student Sarah Hastings has been told home is illegal | Daily Mail Online

Determined carpenter uses salvaged materials to build his Craftsman home (photos) | OregonLive.com

Carpenter Brian Skinner of Washougal, Washington, took 14 years to build a Craftsman-style house from salvaged wood, stained glass and other elements from the 1900s or earlier. Janet Eastman/The Oregonian

“I love the dignity of clear, vertical grain Doug fir and cedar. It’s quiet,” he says. “You put a varnish on it and it looks like it was dipped in honey.” Skinner, a second-generation carpenter, could have created a museum to display the architectural pieces he rescued from grand residences that were being torn down in the 1960s and 1970s. Instead, he saved the pieces and decades later, built a home for himself.

Source: Determined carpenter uses salvaged materials to build his Craftsman home (photos) | OregonLive.com

Akron Ohio News – Deconstruction program building up community

A home in the 500 block of Euclid Avenue slated for demolition, located adjacent to the Akron Zoo, was one of Habitat for Humanity of Summit County’s recent deconstruction projects, shown above. Staff of the nonprofit removed and recycled aluminum siding, gutters and downspouts, with proceeds to be reinvested in the community.

The current program has Habitat going into houses and other buildings before another contractor demolishes them, so that cabinets, doors, vanities, countertops, light fixtures, windows and other items can be removed. Some items are then sold at the ReStore. Other materials such as furnaces, hot water tanks, aluminum siding, gutters, downspouts, aluminum windows, window frames and copper pipes are recycled for scrap, said Sibbio.

Source: Akron Ohio News – Deconstruction program building up community

Remaking Goose Island, One of Chicago’s Great Industrial Hubs – Curbed Chicago

The most dense and vibrant neighborhoods in Chicago tend to have a great stock of historic buildings. Many of these are heavy-timber construction and are literally irreplaceable. Large, monolithic office buildings are cool, but it’s best when they are balanced-out by smaller, historic buildings that feel more accessible — it helps creates an attractive contrast. This mix is an important urban planning principle, and a major factor when we seek out up and coming neighborhoods. In terms of large-scale adaptive reuse opportunities, there is a limited supply and a lot of demand in the developer submarkets, so the footprint will continue to expand. We believe Goose Island buildings are some of the most unique and best located remaining opportunities for adaptive reuse in Chicago.

Source: Remaking Goose Island, One of Chicago’s Great Industrial Hubs – Curbed Chicago

Making Nipper a landmark — officially | All Over Albany

Schumer said this project is widely supported by the community because it would preserve significant and distinctive history, while complementing the surrounding neighborhoods. Without these tax credits, the adaptive reuse costs could be prohibitive. Schumer therefore urged NPS to expedite the developer’s application to list the “Nipper Building” on the National Register of Historic Places so that the beloved statue can be preserved for future generations. …

Source: Making Nipper a landmark — officially | All Over Albany

Fashion and furniture partnership upcycles sweats into sofas, biker jackets into chairs – LA Times

The design collaboration between local furniture maker Stephen Kenn and the menswear label Longjourney includes armchairs made from repurposed leather motorcycle jackets and a sofa upcycled from vintage sweatshirts. (Stephen Kenn X Longjourney)

From afar, the pieces appear to be stylish and modern versions of standard-issue living room furniture. But, upon closer examination, the upholstery covering the chairs is recognizable as patchworked panels from vintage black leather motorcycle jackets. And, while you’d have absolutely no way of knowing it, the eight cushions covering the polished black nickel sofa frame began life as an armload of sweatshirts and tent canvas before being washed, dyed, combed and waxed into a second career, and that some of the frame’s supporting straps are repurposed straps from military parachutes.

Source: Fashion and furniture partnership upcycles sweats into sofas, biker jackets into chairs – LA Times

Union Daily Times | District looking to get rid of vacant schools

Charles Warner | The Union Times The old Excelsior Middle School building on Culp Street has been vacant since it was closed at the end of the 2008-2009 school year. Shortly after it closed, its electrical system was destroyed by thieves who broke in and ripped out the copper wire in the building making it unusable. The Union County School District will conduct a study of the property along with the old Carlsan and Adamsburg school buildings to find the best way to dispose of the properties.

Lawson proposed that the board authorize the study of the properties including the survey, appraisal, and salvage review to help determine the means of disposing of the properties that will best benefit the district. He pointed out that in the case of Carlsan, the study will also include a timber evaluation of the site which has 18-20 acres of pine and hardwood. Lawson said that the evaluation will help determine whether or not the timber should be sold separately or sold with the rest of the property to ensure the district gets the best value possible.

Source: Union Daily Times | District looking to get rid of vacant schools

A Modernist gem falls victim to Vancouver’s housing market – The Globe and Mail

Architecture professor Susan Herringer says Vancouver’s dwindling Modernist stock of houses is considered exemplary of the style. (Evan Ho / Remax)

Ms. Oberlander, who is 94 years old and still working on major projects, says he spent $300,000 or more on painstaking upgrades that were sensitive to the Lassere design, including geothermal heat and high-end appliances in the kitchen that were customized with a colour to fit with the Modernist era. Dr. Friedman had tried to have the house preserved with a heritage designation, but it is in the University Endowment Lands jurisdiction, which is governed by the province. He was told a designation wasn’t available.

Cornelia Hahn Oberlander, 92, in New York. (Eric Thayer / For the Globe and Mail)

Meanwhile, the listing agent has received several offers on the house, which he’ll present April 27 to the board members. Vancouver will lose another piece of its history.

For Ms. Oberlander, her community is being dismantled. She shakes her head.

“It makes me feel sick.”

 

 

Source: A Modernist gem falls victim to Vancouver’s housing market – The Globe and Mail

3 Cool Uses For Repurposed (Or Reclaimed) Wood – Earth911.com

Repurposed versus reclaimed First though, a quick lesson on the differences between reclaimed wood and repurposed wood.

To repurpose wood, sometimes also referred to as upcycling, is to take conditionally good material and re-use it for something other than its originally intended use.

To reclaim wood is to salvage material that has reached the end of its existence, revitalize it with life for use again, and transform it either back to its original intent or for another purpose(s). In short, working with reclaimed wood may require more steps before you get a finished product, but more importantly, both actions save materials from ending up unwanted in a dumpster and eventually in our landfills.

Source: 3 Cool Uses For Repurposed (Or Reclaimed) Wood – Earth911.com

Nonproft rebuilding Portland homes amid affordable housing crisis | KGW.com

This month marks 25 years since the nonprofit began giving back to the community. Since it started, the group has repaired more than 1,200 homes, putting an estimated $20 million in market value back into the Portland metro area.

Malone said his organization has noticed a big increase in need over the last couple years, as Portland faces an affordable housing crisis. “The need is not going down by any means. If these people moved out, they couldn’t afford another house. Young families can’t afford to buy a house, let alone an elderly person. We are dealing with a lot of multiple family units living in one home, because the kids can’t even afford an apartment,” said Malone.

Source: Nonproft rebuilding Portland homes amid affordable housing crisis | KGW.com

737 Cowling Chair – Fallen Furniture

737 COWLING CHAIR AIRCRAFT PART: BOEING 737 ENGINE COWLING. Created from the engine cowling of an Boeing 737, this colossal, luxurious chair, spins weightlessly, on its highly polished spun aluminium base. Stood in its original orientation, this immense, captivating structure, is the opitome of luxury seating.

Source: 737 Cowling Chair – Fallen Furniture

A Reclaimed Wood Installation Sourced From the San Francisco Dump by Barbara Holmes | Colossal

Using sourced and reclaimed materials is at the heart of Holmes’ practice, carefully transforming the untidy elements into aesthetically crafted pieces. “At first glance my work my appear oddly familiar or utilitarian,” says Holmes in her artist statement, “but on closer inspection of the materials and their re-contextualization, the viewer may need to reconsider initial ideas as they discover more layers of meaning.”

Source: A Reclaimed Wood Installation Sourced From the San Francisco Dump by Barbara Holmes | Colossal

Local artists turn felled ash trees into art works – Eau Claire Leader-Telegram

Tim Brudnicki, the owner of Eau Claire Woodworks, discusses the headboards he is making for the Oxbow Hotel from recycled ash trees the city cut down to stop the spread of the emerald ash borer. Brudnicki is among local artisans making furniture and other items from felled ash trees as part of a partnership involving the city of Eau Claire and Wisconsin Urban Wood.

Previously, that wood has been churned into mulch or turned into pulpwood. But now, thanks to a partnership involving the city of Eau Claire, a Madison-based entity seeking to reuse downed urban trees and local artisans such as Brudnicki, those ash trees that lined many city boulevards are being used for other purposes.

“This is a great way of finding better uses for this wood that was otherwise going to a lesser purpose,” he said.

Source: Local artists turn felled ash trees into art works – Eau Claire Leader-Telegram

Venerable B.C. homes shipped by barge to U.S. and offered as cheap housing

“One day there’s a beautiful house on a corner, and the next day it’s gone,” frets Oak Bay rookie councillor Eric Zhelka, who worries his community is losing its old country charm, its heart and soul. Many of them are shipped south to Washington state, where people appreciate their hand-nailed craftsmanship and character. Oak Bay’s early 20th-century dwellings are being floated on barges to San Juan Island, where they’re offered to folks stuck in affordable housing jams.

Source: Venerable B.C. homes shipped by barge to U.S. and offered as cheap housing

Architectural salvage gives a home some character

AlbanyRadiators

Old-time radiators are common items seen at salvage shops like Historic Albany Parts Warehouse. (Photo: Provided)

In honor of Earth Day on April 22, consider purchasing used items that promote the motto of the three Rs: reduce, re-use and recycle. By incorporating architectural salvage items into your next project, you not only keep usable items out of the landfill, but you can also add a bit of history into your own home at significant savings..

ReHouse door plates

ReHouse Architectural Salvage in Rochester has a variety of door plates and other items from older homes upstate. (Photo: Provided)

Source: Architectural salvage gives a home some character

Gary wins Knight grant to deconstruct, recycle vacant homes | Northwest Indiana Business Headlines | nwitimes.com

The city and the Delta Institute’s Steel City Salvage project just won a $385,000 grant from the Knight Foundation to deconstruct homes and recycle the building materials like lumber and architectural features. It was the largest individual grant out of the $5 million awarded in the Knight Cities Challenge, which had attracted more than 4,500 proposals from across the country.

“This is not simply about the demolition of vacant and abandoned buildings,” Gary Mayor Karen Freeman-Wilson said. “But it promotes the deconstruction of vacant and abandoned buildings, as well as the repurposing and recycling of the material. One of the things we know about the city of Gary is there are beautiful homes here that have fallen into disrepair, that cannot be repurposed but the materials in those homes can certainly be reused for something else.”

Source: Gary wins Knight grant to deconstruct, recycle vacant homes | Northwest Indiana Business Headlines | nwitimes.com

Recycled Art Contest | Milwaukee Habitat for Humanity

ReStore’s 7th Annual Recycled Art Contest shines a light on some of Milwaukee’s resourceful repurposers. The contest challenges the public to create works primarily using the donated product found at ReStore. From artwork to repurposed furniture, the only rule of the contest is the majority of materials must be purchased at ReStore.

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With 34 entries to choose from, the works are judged by the public with polling stations in store and online HERE. The top five vote getters will receive ReStore shopping sprees. As for the artists, they range from professionals like Debby Koenig of Earthfire Artistry (entry 20) to group art classes from the Milwaukee Center for Independence.

Winners will be revealed during the Third Ward’s Gallery Night, April 15th at ReStore East (5pm-9pm). The entire exhibit will be featured in the Historic Third Ward’s Gallery Night & Day, April 15th & 16th at Restore East (420 S 1st, Milwaukee), with many of the works for sale to the public.

 

Source: Recycled Art Contest | Milwaukee Habitat for Humanity

Reclaimed Lamps from Hobart Industrial Mixer Hooks – For Sale

These lamps are Hobart industrial dough hooks and a paddle. Edison bulbs on a dimmer, stand 2′ tall & are brushed aluminum. They are heavy in case you are wondering about shipping. $250 a piece plus shipping – contact reclamationnews@gmail.com for details.