Theft of wood from barn in Qualicum Bay: Nailed down but not safe – Parksville Qualicum News

Wood planking was stripped from the wall of a 75-year-old barn alongside the Island Highway in Qualicum Bay by a trespasser earlier this month.— Image Credit: J.R. RARDON PHOTO

The barn apparently fell victim to a hot building trend, in which weathered and distressed wood from salvage buildings is used to build furniture, wall paneling and trendy bars and restaurants. “I get people here looking for it all the time,” said Bernie Muller of Demxx Deconstruction in Coombs. “You’ll have guys in Vancouver who pay $7 a square foot for those slabs. It’s probably more valuable than drugs.”

Source: Theft of wood from barn in Qualicum Bay: Nailed down but not safe – Parksville Qualicum News

Residents learn to build by deconstruction

Construction crew (from left) Marcus Banks, Demetrik

Construction crew (from left) Marcus Banks, Demetrik Williams and supervisor Steven Teasley listen while Mayor Tom Barrett holds a press conference in front of a home at 2700 block of N. 40th St. Angela Peterson

The city will train unemployed residents of the Sherman Park neighborhood for construction jobs by starting them on crews to disassemble vacant city-owned houses, Mayor Tom Barrett said Wednesday.

Dismantling an abandoned house with a goal of salvaging building materials for reuse and recycling can provide the training and work experience needed for someone to step into a job in the construction industry, he said.

Source: Residents learn to build by deconstruction

Nearly 2,000 square feet of vintage lumber salvaged from Dibbleville house – Tri-County Times: News For Fenton, Linden, Holly MI

TRI-COUNTY TIMES | TIM JAGIELO
While the landscaping is still well tended, the house on Shiawassee Avenue, as of Friday, Sept. 9, was nearly gone.

“We’ve been building homes for years, and have demolished a lot,” said Bloomingdale. “I always felt bad about disposing of material that we’re never going to find again. Slow-growth lumber doesn’t exist anymore and here we are throwing it away.”  That’s why Bloomingdale decided to get himself a warehouse and start dismantling and reusing materials out of these homes.

Source: Nearly 2,000 square feet of vintage lumber salvaged from Dibbleville house – Tri-County Times: News For Fenton, Linden, Holly MI

This bar may not be art, but it is an inspiring reuse | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

A closeup view of the maple top of a bar that Dave Matline and Dave Baldonieri made from an old bowling alley. It was a special award winner in the Reuse Inspiration Contest.

Knowing that Mr. Baldonieri had once used bowling alley wood to make a work bench, Mr. Matlin was delighted to find pieces of maple lanes for sale at Construction Junction, a nonprofit retailer of salvaged and surplus building materials in Point Breeze. But none were quite right for the project. Then he discovered more damaged sections on the loading dock — for free! “We started hacking and whacking,” Mr. Matlin said. “It worked out better than I thought it would.”

Source: This bar may not be art, but it is an inspiring reuse | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

For Sale: Reclaimed Bicycle Peddle Hanging Light – Portland, Oregon

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Hop and Vine is gone but these peddles once graced their walls. If you’ve ever been you’d remember the decor. Nostalgia for old Portland inspired this hanging lamp. Edison bulb, cloth covered wire, dimmer. $225. Contact reclamationnews @ gmail for more information on how to purchase.

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For Sale: Industrial Mechanical Table – Portland, Oregon

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A very sweet rolling table for sale. Cast aluminum base, adjustable height (2 ft at the tallest), 16″ x 22″ top. This is a mix of glue-lam top with a 1960’s drafting chair bottom. The handle is the chair’s adjustment knob. $300. Contact reclamationnews @ gmail for more information.

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For Sale: Modern Chandelier Made From Reclaimed Rose Parade Float- Portland, Oregon

Two years ago I worked as a welder fabricating the Rose Parade Floats for the City of Portland, Oregon. This chandelier is made from a support armature that was eventually cut out of the float structure. It makes a perfect modern hanging light. Own a piece of Portland reclaimed history!

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Reclaimed steel armature from the City of Portland’s Rose Parade float. Edison bulb, cloth covered wire, dimmer switch. $225. Contact reclamationnews @ gmail for purchase information.

 

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Portland Promotes Deconstruction Over Demolition – Next City

(Credit: Lovett Deconstruction)

“We’re providing money to these projects but we’re getting something back,” says Wood. “We’re getting hard data but then also some softer stuff like lessons learned.” That feedback helped inform the deconstruction ordinance. Grant recipients were required to place a sign on the site of an active deconstruction, for example, to educate the public and promote the method. The ordinance requires signage too. The grants will continue; they’ve recently been increased to $3,000.

Source: Portland Promotes Deconstruction Over Demolition – Next City

The problems Perth businesses face recycling asbestos construction waste | Perth Now

Muchea Land Fill foreman Troy Owen is concerned recycled material, which will potentially go into buildings, may contain asbestos. Picture: Justin Benson-Cooper

“(Demolition rubble) can’t be 100 per cent asbestos free,” Mr Scott said. “If you demolish a building it doesn’t matter how careful you are, you are going to get asbestos.” “We have machines with throughput volumes of 5000 tonnes an hour. When you look at the volumes we play with, that’s a lot of asbestos we can put out,” he added.

Source: The problems Perth businesses face recycling asbestos construction waste | Perth Now

Sept. 1 is deadline for Reuse Inspiration Contest | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Ronald Robertson and Richard Prescott of East Liberty were winners in the 2015 Reuse Inspiration Contest for this 8-by-10-foot wall hanging made from old tin ceiling tiles.

Sept. 1 is the entry deadline for the sixth annual contest co-sponsored by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and Construction Junction. There are two categories: • Home renovation — creative re-use of one or more items in renovation of one room or an entire building. • Art — creative re-use of one or more items in a two- or three-dimensional work of art.

Source: Sept. 1 is deadline for Reuse Inspiration Contest | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

This Library In Indonesia Is Made Out Of Upcycled Ice Cream Buckets

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The structure is one of a kind and has garnered attention all over the world. Even though the library isn’t too big, it stands for something huge, sustainability. Every year tons of plastic waste is accumulated and is clogging waterways and destroying beaches all over the globe. The idea, that we could use this material to actually make something creative and useful is quite amazing.

Source: This Library In Indonesia Is Made Out Of Upcycled Ice Cream Buckets

Why Environmental Managers, Investors Love Circular Economy Technologies · Environmental Leader · Environmental Management News

Lux Research circular economy report

“In many cases, the net value of recycling waste materials is more than the value of the energy generated from them,” he said. “Also, reducing the need for virgin materials is the most important, from a perspective of environmental protection. Based on this logic, among the practices in circular economy, reuse is usually the best solution. Recycling and composting are the second best options. If reuse, recycling, and composting are not feasible or don’t make economic and environmental sense, waste to energy should be a good solution.”

Source: Why Environmental Managers, Investors Love Circular Economy Technologies · Environmental Leader · Environmental Management News

Misinformation: Deconstruction of an old house can provide huge tax benefits for property owners – The Washington Post

cropped-Bruces-Snake-Offical-Logo.jpgThis is a shockingly misinformed article by the Washington Post on deconstruction appraisals and tax deduction. Very few professional appraisers in the building material reuse industry use this method. This article likely encouraging tax fraud.

If you are interested in information on how to have building material appraisals performed, and accurate tax documentation for you donation please contact:

ReUse Consulting or the Building Material Reuse Association 

The Ivanova appraisal report documented that her donation had a fair market value of $131,500. The net amount of the donation represented a $51,000 tax benefit. The family received a substantial tax refund.

Source: Deconstruction of an old house can provide huge tax benefits for property owners – The Washington Post

northeast portland neighbors set to buy back historic home | KATU

The Ocobock Mansion in Northeast Portland was built in 1913. (KATU Photo)

Other neighbors are concerned with how fast a home could be bought and almost torn down with little community input. “This house is indicative of so much of what’s happening here in Portland right now,” said Matthew Breeze, “How do we keep our communities livable and have a public process. I’m happy to have infill, but it should happen in a way that’s transparent.”

Source: northeast portland neighbors set to buy back historic home | KATU

Old barns are turning into hot decorating product | netnebraska.org

Mike Hudson, standing in the hayloft of his current barn project, says he will deconstruct about 10-12 barns in the next year. He sells the reclaimed wood at his lumberyard in Elbert, Colorado. (Photo by Kristofor Husted, Harvest Public Media)

“Most people want those accent pieces,” he says. “They want to have those pretty beams in the ceiling or they want to have the barn wood walls, or the tables and the furniture.” A few years ago, many farmers didn’t understand how valuable their old barns were and might have been swindled, Bowe says, but today they know the capital they’re sitting on. He says we’re in the midst of a barn wood frenzy right now, but it still likely has a shelf life. Indeed, there are only so many weathered barns in the U.S.

Source: Old barns are turning into hot decorating product | netnebraska.org

Daylighting, demolition and disaster resilience: BRE Trust is making headway on green building research

Building Research Establishment Trust is working on several research projects focused on mitigation and resilience to climate change

Another research project last year also looked at the impacts of deconstruction – or, essentially, demolishing buildings – on the circular economy, as “effectively dealing with buildings at the end of their life has the potential to unlock significant economic value”, according to the Trust. Construction and the built environment is the single biggest user of materials and generator of waste in the UK economy, but the value that can be extracted from deconstruction is very much dependent on how buildings have been designed and built.

Source: Daylighting, demolition and disaster resilience: BRE Trust is making headway on green building research

Duo works toward a greener future

John Steinbeck and Dusty VanRenan Green Rivers Recycling LLC.

“Old-growth lumber is lumber that is so old that the trees that were here when the settlers first came or what they used or milled for building materials. It’s a very dense wood, impervious to termites and it’s highly sought after by a lot of builders throughout the country,” he said. “You’re also preserving these old buildings, which is really important to some of the farmers and owners around here. The building obviously can’t stay, but at least the materials that their forefathers used to erect these structures can still prove to be preserved and not just wasted by going through a landfill and being burned.”

Source: Duo works toward a greener future

New state program could help save North Jersey’s historical buildings – NJ State News – NorthJersey.com

“The millennial generation is rejecting the cookie-cutter suburbia of manicured lawns and McMansions and are going for things that are more quirky,” said Tim Adriance, past president of the Bergen County Historical Society. “They are looking for something more solid with history that has connection to something.”

Source: New state program could help save North Jersey’s historical buildings – NJ State News – NorthJersey.com

Zero-Waste Town Creates Buildings From Reclaimed Materials

The Kamikazt Public House embraces the zero-waste mission of Kamikatsu within its blueprint, displaying a number of curated eco-friendly and environmentally-conscious choices within its design. The structure possesses openings throughout, where cool air can flow in during the summer season, including the building’s eight-meter-tall wall of windows made from an assortment of reclaimed materials from nearby abandoned houses. The building also possesses reclaimed tiles for the flooring, a chandelier made from bottles and newspapers repurposed into wallpaper while the exterior boasts reclaimed cedarwood boards colored with naturally derived persimmon tannin paint.

Source: Zero-Waste Town Creates Buildings From Reclaimed Materials

Once Blighted Trenton Lot Goes From Eyesore to Urban Oasis | Town Topics

FROM URBAN BLIGHT TO FARM: Planting is ongoing at Trenton’s Capital City Farm, a joint effort of several non-profit groups that has turned a trash-strewn lot into a verdant space designed to provide fresh produce and more to the local community and beyond.

While Capital City Farm is only in its first season, there are signs that it is having the desired effect. “People are curious,” Ms. Mead said, “especially those who come to the Soup Kitchen. Some teenagers from the neighborhood are excited about working on the farm. People are stopping by. It’s been an interesting thing to watch.”

Source: Once Blighted Trenton Lot Goes From Eyesore to Urban Oasis | Town Topics

Dickinson County News: Community News: Camp Okoboji to auction building, contents (08/02/16)

Starting at 3 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 14, Camp Okoboji will be auctioning off its Crafts building in order to make room for the new DISCOVER Activity Center.

The goal is to recycle, reclaim and repurpose as much of the Crafts building as possible. It has many old windows and doors, benches, work tables, wood flooring, tongue and grove siding and paneling, exhaust fans, bathroom fixtures, etc.

Source: Dickinson County News: Community News: Camp Okoboji to auction building, contents (08/02/16)

A barn abode

Greenwich, Conneticut barn home.

“From the 1700s, it used to be that every farm had a barn before American agriculture began becoming mechanized in the 19th century,” Durkin says. “For 20 years, our company has been disassembling these old barns — before they fall down — and reassembling these old barns as someone’s new home.”

Source: A barn abode

Saguenay man has barn walls stolen. Are design trends to blame? – Montreal – CBC News

Claude Villeneuve had barn two barn walls stolen earlier this week. (Radio-Canada)

Villeneuve estimates the thieves made off with about $2,000 worth of wood.  He said he’s been approached several times by prospective buyers interested in the planks that compose the sides his barn. He had always rebuffed them, given that his farm still makes used of the barn to store hay. But now Villeneuve is considering taking down what remains of the barn to salvage the wood. “At least they left me one wall,” he said, laughing.

Source: Saguenay man has barn walls stolen. Are design trends to blame? – Montreal – CBC News

Reclaimed Lath Home Design Ideas, Pictures, Remodel and Decor

This wood is the lath (as in lath and plaster) from the same walls that were taken down to complete the remodel. It was sanded and refinished to remove nails and other problems, highlighting the hundred-year-old beauty of the reclaimed wood.

The 25-foot long light fixture is made of reclaimed lath boards undulating along the entire length of the attic bedroom. The light source is warm white LED’s on a dimmer, so the homeowner can adjust the brightness for a dramatic glow at night.

Source: Reclaimed Lath Home Design Ideas, Pictures, Remodel and Decor

Baltimore rowhouse wood gets new life as furniture – Baltimore Sun

Peter Martin, carpenter, Sandtown Millworks, sands a large piece of wood salvaged in Baltimore. The reclaimed wood is used to make furniture. Kim Hairston, Baltimore Sun

When Bolster started renovating rowhouses 20 years ago, he noticed that very few people in the industry saved the wood they pulled out of the homes. “It all ended up in landfills,” he said. “I started saving some of the wood because the character of it was so much more fantastic than new wood.” Some of the first creations to come from Bolster’s shop were made of wood salvaged from houses in Baltimore’s Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood — hence the name. “Many of our designs are driven by the wood dimensions we pulled from those rowhouses,” he said. During the past couple of years, Bolster said, his furniture business has snowballed, rivaling his renovation company.

Source: Baltimore rowhouse wood gets new life as furniture – Baltimore Sun

Deconstruction vs. Demolition: Portland, Oregon’s Potential for Groundbreaking Health and Safety Studies in Building Demolition – By Sara Badiali

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Deconstruction vs. Demolition: Portland, Oregon’s Potential for Groundbreaking Health and Safety Studies in Building Demolition – By Sara Badiali

Demolition: deliberate destruction of a building or other structure.[1]

Deconstruction: the systematic dismantling of a building in order to recover the maximum amount of materials for reuse and recycling.[2]

 

The City of Portland is poised to contribute to the study of health and safety in building removal. The Deconstruction Ordinance will take effect starting October 2016. The ordinance outlines single family homes built before 1916 must be deconstructed for material reuse.  Deconstructing buildings will greatly lower greenhouse gas emissions and material disposal in landfills over traditional demolition.  Deconstruction not only provides access to unique materials but also viable building materials that would otherwise go to waste. The Deconstruction Ordinance will provide the first ever opportunity for side by side comparisons of demolition verses building deconstruction for environmental health and safety measures.

Portland presents an environment of blistering-fast paced development, houses upwards of one-hundred years old, and established demolition and deconstruction companies. Residential interest in environmental health and safety is at an all-time high due to incidents pertaining to lead and radon, and unprecedented housing demolition. Portland is also home to multiple academic organizations specializing in environmental health issues, health sciences, urban planning, and architecture.

By hosting studies of building removals, new information will lead to a better understanding of hazardous material reductions and ultimately best practices. Consequently research in Portland could be the catalyst for laws regulating more than standards for lead dust fall, but also heavy metals, asbestos, and water contamination in demolition practices.

 

Hazardous Particulates in Buildings

When a building is demolished, the mechanical action of crushing creates particulates of dust from the building’s materials. These particulates enter the air and spread throughout the environment.  Machines repeatedly driving over the worksite further circulate these particulates. Atmospheric conditions like wind can exacerbate the spread of dust.

There are currently no U.S. federal regulatory standards for lead dust fall, exterior settled dust, or dust-suppression methods in housing demolition.[3] There are also very few demolition dust fall related studies, or inquiries into whether hand dismantling structures (deconstruction) reduces the spread of potentially hazardous air particulates.

Lead and asbestos are by far the most studied and discussed of hazardous materials attributed to buildings. Asbestos is proven to cause the fatal diseases asbestosis, pleural disease, and lung cancer. According to a 2011 survey by U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control, over 37 million homes have lead based paint somewhere in the building. [4] The majority of hazardous lead is in homes built before 1978.

One study indicates that 37 billion square feet of building components are coated with deteriorated lead-based paint.[5] A 2008 study of lead exposures in U.S. children found that “Exposure to lead can occur from many pathways and sources, but housing is the main pathway of exposure in the U.S., accounting for approximately 70% of childhood lead poisoning cases.”[6]

There are other less well known potential health hazards in buildings.  Arsenic and heavy metals like chromium, copper, iron, and manganese are harmful to humans. These heavy metals are thought to be from use of pressure treated wood manufactured before 2003.  Mercury is a common toxic waste present in buildings, including gas pressure regulators, boiler heating systems, and thermostats. According to the Massachusetts Water Resource Authority “The amount of mercury present in one mercury thermometer is enough to pollute 5 million gallons of water.”[7] That is the capacity to contaminate a 20-acre lake with enough mercury to result in a fish consumption warning, says Wastecap of Massachusetts. Benzene, a chemical related to natural gas, is also found harmful to humans. Environmental dust is especially problematic for people who suffer from asthma.

(more…)

This Toronto design studio uses upcycling to turn trash into treasure – The Globe and Mail

Fugitive Glue has made a variety of items from light fixtures, to stools, to an art installation in 2012. (Samson Wong)

“[It’s] where we isolate a waste stream, collect batches of that base material, come up with a design and create products,” says Jano Badovinac, 39, the mastermind behind the six-year-old company. In this case, “We’d collect propane tanks from decommissioning stations, clean them, cut them down, weld them into something.”

Source: This Toronto design studio uses upcycling to turn trash into treasure – The Globe and Mail

Construction waste puts Metro Vancouver recycling facilities at capacity – British Columbia – CBC News

 

Harvest Power CEO Christian Kasper says his New Westminster construction and demolition waste facility is operating at capacity. (Jared Thomas/CBC)

Waste from construction and demolition sites are piling up so quickly that recycling facilities say they’re having a tough time keeping up with demand.

“This [New Westminster] facility receives about 500 tones per day, that’s our maximum permitted capacity and that is what we are taking in right now.”

Source: Construction waste puts Metro Vancouver recycling facilities at capacity – British Columbia – CBC News

Recycling the Past to Build the Future — Environmental Protection

Tacoma started by cleaning the waterways, polluted from decades of industry. New strategies, new technologies, such as "fingerprinting" of pollutants in the water, and new processes were developed, in partnership between UW Tacoma and the city. (Economic Development Board for Tacoma-Pierce County photo)

Tacoma’s downtown had character. And instead of wiping it out, the city reclaimed it, just as it had reclaimed the waterways. In an effort to be sustainable and adaptive while keeping that character, the city stressed creatively repurposing and developing older and historic buildings, which other cities, including Seattle, had been tearing down for new development. Almost overnight, Tacoma became a leader in green building and creative reuse.

Source: Recycling the Past to Build the Future — Environmental Protection

From red-hot steel to red-hot tech: reinventing an old industrial site — NewsWorks

RIDC President Don Smith (right) and Tim White (center) say they’re eager to see development finally begin across the 178-acre LTV Steel Hazelwood site in southeast Pittsburgh. (Megan Harris/WESA)

The mill shut down in the late 1990s, and in 2002, was bought by RIDC and a group of local foundations — including the Heinz Endowments and Richard King Mellon Foundation — intent on reclaiming the land for the city and community. They’ve remediated the land, renamed the site “Almono,” after Pittsburgh’s three rivers (Allegheny, Monogahela, Ohio), and are in the process of installing key infrastructure, like water and sewer lines, utilities, and a road.

Source: From red-hot steel to red-hot tech: reinventing an old industrial site — NewsWorks

Habitat For Humanity withdraws from observatory deconstruction project – Mission City Record

“I myself am heartbroken that this observatory is being taken down. We did not realize that some people would be upset with us trying to help recycle some of the material instead of it just being disposed of. We only are allowed to use new material for our builds, we sell recycled material at our ReStores to help us build affordable housing. “To set the record straight we have been working on affordable housing with the city for over a year. Due to the concerns put forward we will withdraw our service of helping to recycle the material when it is disposed of.”

Source: Habitat For Humanity withdraws from observatory deconstruction project – Mission City Record

Column: Deconstruction beats demolition

We could easily imagine a Revive Pontiac program graduate one day purchasing a condemned house, deconstructing it, turning the reclaimed material into a hot product, and then pitching their new business on “Shark Tank.”Deconstruction — demolition’s smarter cousin — is now alive and well in Oakland County and throughout the region, which is good for individuals, neighborhoods, property values, and our economic prosperity.

Source: Column: Deconstruction beats demolition

Two Shoe BBQ, Seattle – Best Reclaimed Interior

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Reclaimed wood interior and amazing chainsaw chandelier.

20 plus years of experience working in other BBQ restaurants followed by 3 years of testing our own recipes and rubs out of our Airstream trailer food truck has brought us here. All of our meats come from sustainable farms in Washington and Oregon that pride themselves on organic, hormone free, pasture raised, free range, well taken care of animals!

Source: About Us – Two Shoe BBQ

Detroit group that salvages homes is recovering after fire | The Merced Sun-Star

FILE - In a Feb. 28, 2013 file photo, workers at Reclaim Detroit salvage wood that was taken from abandon homes in the city and making them useful for other projects, in Detroit. Reclaim Detroit, that gives new life to wood, doors and antique fixtures salvaged from deserted homes is getting its own revival. With no strings attached, Reclaim Detroit said it has received a $100,000 grant after a fire destroyed a workshop, tools and wood saved from more than 100 houses. (Mandi Wright/Detroit Free Press via AP) DETROIT NEWS OUT; MAGS OUT; NO SALES /Detroit Free Press via AP) DETROIT NEWS OUT; TV OUT; MAGS OUT; NO SALES; MANDATORY CREDIT DETROIT FREE PRESS

FILE – In a Feb. 28, 2013 file photo, workers at Reclaim Detroit salvage wood that was taken from abandon homes in the city and making them useful for other projects, in Detroit. Reclaim Detroit, that gives new life to wood, doors and antique fixtures salvaged from deserted homes is getting its own revival. With no strings attached, Reclaim Detroit said it has received a $100,000 grant after a fire destroyed a workshop, tools and wood saved from more than 100 houses. (Mandi Wright/Detroit Free Press via AP)

Read more here: http://www.mercedsunstar.com/news/business/article87468137.html#storylink=cpy

Reclaim Detroit operated at a large warehouse in Highland Park that was destroyed by fire in February. It hopes to open a new mill shop this summer, thanks to Open Road, which provided the largest grant. “Our ability to earn money was imperiled by the fire. … We lost a lot of antique doors and handles. We lost all of the circular saws, ladders, pickaxes. You name it, we lost it,” Dundon said. “Insurance didn’t cover all the losses. It’s extremely difficult for the insurance market to value salvage materials.”

Source: Detroit group that salvages homes is recovering after fire | The Merced Sun-Star

Newman grads practice the three R’s: reclaim, repurpose, reinvent | SaukValley.com

Austin Ryan (left) and Austin Sensenig haul out pieces from an old barn for their business, Green River Barn Salvage. (Philip Marruffo/pmarruffo@saukvalley.com)

“We are always in contact with anyone who has an excavator or a backhoe,” said Ryan, who lives in Rock Falls. “We can make dinner tables, benches, bookshelves, bird feeders, bird houses, everything.”

Source: Newman grads practice the three R’s: reclaim, repurpose, reinvent | SaukValley.com

Designer Turns Old Bowling Lanes Into Classic Furniture

He still uses reclaimed wood from shuttered bowling alleys and steel from old industrial buildings that are being torn down, continuing to live up to CounterEvolution’s mission statement:

To design, build, and sell quality products that realize the highest potential of reclaimed materials with the ultimate goal of bringing functional art, thoughtfully designed and meticulously crafted, into your home or business.

Source: Designer Turns Old Bowling Lanes Into Classic Furniture

Portland City Council to discuss deconstruction requirements | OregonLive.com

This Eastmoreland house was torn down last fall to make way for new construction. Mike Francis | The Oregonian/OregonLive

Already, though, some say the new rule isn’t enough. A group called United Neighborhoods for Reform wants the City Council to require deconstruction for all homes built before 1978 — when the government banned lead paint in consumer uses.

“When a house is demolished through mechanical demolition, lead is pulverized and sent up into the air and falls into neighbors’ yards as dust,” said Barbara Kerr, the group’s representative on the city’s Deconstruction Advisory Group. “If it’s deconstructed, it poses little danger.”

Source: Portland City Council to discuss deconstruction requirements | OregonLive.com

More on what’s wrong with shipping container architecture: Everything. : TreeHugger

© studio bauhaus, ryuji inoue via designboom

It is all very odd. You wouldn’t build a kindergarten out of old shipping containers, since they are covered in the most toxic of paints designed to last years on the ocean. You wouldn’t take new shipping containers because any argument about environmental responsibility is out the window; there is far more steel in them than is actually needed.

Source: More on what’s wrong with shipping container architecture: Everything. : TreeHugger

Revive Pontiac teaches job skills, harvests vintage building materials

Brandon Shirlee of Pontiac works on the interior of a long-vacant building on West Huron near the former Pontiac Central High School. Shirlee is one of 10 workers who are learning job skills while harvesting wood, tile and more from aging buildings to sell in the vintage building materials market. Anne Runkle — The Oakland Press

“You can’t buy 100-year-old oak anymore,” said Ron Borngesser, OLHSA chief executive officer, as he explained the value of harvesting materials from the building, which dates to 1920. It has been vacant for about three decades and had recently been home to squatters, he said. OLHSA is working in cooperation with Architectural Salvage Warehouse of Detroit, a nonprofit organization that promotes the environmental advantages of diverting reusable building materials from landfills, as well as the job training benefits.

Source: Revive Pontiac teaches job skills, harvests vintage building materials

Portland Moves Forward With Demolition Ban For Old Homes . News | OPB

Squatters protest the demolition of a home in Southeast Portland. Amelia Templeton/OPB

“This will allow residents to acquire quality used building materials such as old growth lumber and some of the pieces of Portland history that otherwise would have been discarded into the landfill,” said Zach Klonoski, a sustainability advisor to the mayor.

Source: Portland Moves Forward With Demolition Ban For Old Homes . News | OPB

Concerns and Questions Mount Over Demolition Appeal Process | The Portland Chronicle

“It’s possible to have a neighborhood under this section of code with very few financial resources, and then we have a case here where there’s a neighborhood with a significant amount of resources and we get an entirely different result,” he said. “From a diversity, from a fairness, from a just general perception of government I think, that raises the possibility of having different decisions based solely on economics.”

Source: Concerns and Questions Mount Over Demolition Appeal Process | The Portland Chronicle