Decon + Reuse ’17 Awards Nomination Form

Decon + Reuse ’17 Awards Nomination Form The work of developing the reuse, salvage and deconstruction industries is done everyday by dedicated individuals. At each conference we take a night to honor those people whose daily work has an outsize impact and benefits us all.

If you know a person or organization deserving of recognition for such activities, please nominate them here!

Awards this year will be recognized for folks who are working at the local level as well as those whose impact has been felt nationally. The BMRA reserves the right to make multiple awards in a category, transfer a nomination to another category, or not to designate any award in a category.

Source: Decon + Reuse ’17 Awards Nomination Form

Home-made Hendrix guitar lands in Sandspit – Haida Gwaii Observer

Topped by recycled fir baseboards from Jimi Hendrix’ childhood home, this guitar made by luthier Reuben Forsland also has nails and wiring from the home inlaid in all of its fret markers. The “story” guitar is a collaboration between Forsland and Kevin Hennig of Symphontree Music in Sandspit. (Kevin Hennig/Symphontree Music)

Handmade by Reuben Forsland, a Métis luthier in Comox, its soundboard is made from the fir baseboards of Hendrix’ bedroom. Inside the silver fret markers are wires and nails from the home. For the rosette, the decorative trim around the soundhole, Forsland inlaid bits of paint from the Hendrix home floor, encased in 150 pieces of ebony. “That’s what this guy does, all the time,” says Kevin Hennig, owner of SymphonTree Music, a specialized guitar shop based in Sandspit.

Source: Home-made Hendrix guitar lands in Sandspit – Haida Gwaii Observer

Something old, something new. (Re)using salvaged building materials | Metro

Mary Reese hunts for tile at the new Habitat for Humanity ReStore in Gresham.

Jacobson compares shopping for salvaged building materials to thrift or vintage shopping, and advises shopping early and often. “Stock changes from day to day and quantities can be limited,” he says. “The list of stores is growing and that makes it easier to find what you need, but the region’s supply chain for used building materials is still a work in progress” Also, he says, find a contractor willing to work with you, one who’s willing to deconstruct and salvage materials, as well as incorporate reused items into the new space.

Source: Something old, something new. (Re)using salvaged building materials | Metro

SoDo’s Recology CleanScapes Program Gives Seattle Artists Mountain of Trash

Image Credit:
Hayley Young
Recology CleanScapes Artists in Residence Max Cleary and Meg Hartwig exercises her “scavenging privileges” at SoDo recycling facility.

“What’s interesting about recycled materials is that when it comes down to it, they’re all just things caught in a cycle of being acquired and passed on,” Cleary observed in April, early in his residency. “The materials I find within Recology’s recycling stream have the potential to contain richer, more unexpected backgrounds and be in unpredictable states, which is exciting to me.”

Source: SoDo’s Recology CleanScapes Program Gives Seattle Artists Mountain of Trash

Going green: What’s in it for sports venue owners? | Construction Dive

The Barclays Center opted for a variety of green features. Credit: Adam E. Moreira

Arena designers also repurposed construction materials from the structures that were demolished to make way for the Kings’ new home, resulting in more than one-third of the new building’s material recycled from the old ones. Designers even used recycled athletic shoes for the court surfaces.

Source: Going green: What’s in it for sports venue owners? | Construction Dive

Deconstruction hailed as answer for ailing cities

Details, an organization in Baltimore, is one of dozens of similar groups around the country helping to remake cities through deconstruction. USA TODAY

Advocates hail deconstruction as a win-win that is more economical and environmentally friendly than demolition. They say it creates needed jobs and can help depressed cities turn things around.  “The systematic deconstruction and dismantling of buildings has a profound role in transforming communities,” said Anne Nicklin, executive director of the Building Materials Reuse Association, based in Chicago. Deconstruction seems to be on the rise, Nicklin said, citing programs not only in Baltimore, but also in Chicago, Detroit, Portland, Buffalo, Cleveland and other places.

Source: Deconstruction hailed as answer for ailing cities

BMRA News, July 2017

PDX RUST: A Community Reuse Forum Alongside DECON + REUSE ’17 Coming out of the recent passage of the deconstruction ordinance in Portland, Oregon as well as the event of DECON + REUSE ’17 coming to the city, Sara Badiali of Reclamation Administration and Barbara Kerr of United Neighborhoods for Reform felt it was time for the community to celebrate reuse in Portland.

The result of this is PDX RUST, or Portland ReUse for Societal Transformation. The basic premise of PDX Rust is this: A national conference on building materials reuse is coming to town; how can we get the local community involved with this issue and this resource of expertise?  By inviting venues like cafes and stores to host speaking events where 3 speakers talk about their experience and passion for reuse.

According to Sara Badiali, Portland loves a party, so if you create an event and give people a chance to share their passions, people will come.  The speakers can talk about reuse fashion, building materials, hacker/maker stuff — really anything to do with reuse.

This is an opportunity for DECON + REUSE ’17 conference-goers to get connected to the local community by attending, or even speaking at, PDX RUST events.  You can find out more about the events here.  Postings and calendar will be updated regularly, all the way up through the conference.  Check it out!

Source: BMRA News, July 2017

Fewer CO2 emissions by reusing others’ ‘stuff’ » Yale Climate Connections

Anne Nicklin, executive director of the Building Materials Reuse Association, which represents suppliers of used construction parts, says that only a “a very tiny percentage” of useful items currently is salvaged from building demolitions. Times are changing, though, she says. Governmental officials, mostly at the municipal and county levels, are discovering that reclaiming stuff from torn-down buildings helps them conserve landfill space and avoid the economic and environmental downsides of trucking waste to far-off disposal sites. “They realize that they have a problem and that this is the best available solution.”

Source: Fewer CO2 emissions by reusing others’ ‘stuff’ » Yale Climate Connections

Fireworks Flash Sale Thru Friday – Last Chance for Discount Tix

Last chance for earlybird pricing + outstanding keynotes + book your hotel now!

Fireworks Flash Sale Thru Friday!

Say that five times fast…

In keeping with a celebratory week, we’ve created a special sale and brought back earlybird pricing on Decon + Reuse ’17 for five days only!. Register today to lock in the savings, or wait til Sunday and help donate a bit extra to the BMRA.

Jim Lindberg & Adam Minter – Keynote Speakers

We have locked down two really outstanding keynote speakers for the conference. On Monday September 25th, Adam Minter will kick off the conference speaking to the globalization of reuse and recycling markets. Then on Tuesday we’ll hear from Jim Lindberg of Preservation Green Lab on how reuse is a key tool of re-urbanization and future building.

Hotel Blocks in Portland

The low low pricing that we managed to negotiate at two hotels in Portland expires on 7/24/17 – book your rooms today!

Loch sunglasses are made of 500-year-old timbers from the Great Lakes : TreeHugger

© Loch

These logs are from trees that began growing about 500 years old or more, the remaining spoils of the logging boom that ravished eastern Canada’s forests throughout the 19th century. At the time, millions of logs were transported along waterways, floated down rivers and over rapids and hauled across lakes by tugboats in giant ‘booms’. They were destined for the shipyards of Europe and sawmills of America. Sometimes these logs sank to the bottom of the lake, where they were preserved in the cold, dark water. Only now, nearly two hundred years later, are they resurfacing.

Source: Loch sunglasses are made of 500-year-old timbers from the Great Lakes : TreeHugger

Decon + Reuse ’17 Speakers invited by the Reclamation Administration

The Reclamation Administration has made a lot of friends over the years.

We are proud to say that over a third of the speakers for Decon + Reuse ’17 Expo: Saving our Past, Building the Future are from our invitations. These presenters have all been featured on the Reclamation Administration going as far back as 2011!

Here is a list of Presenters brought to you by the Reclamation Administration.  You can see them all in Portland, Oregon on September 24th – 27th at the Decon + Reuse ’17 Expo.

James Lindberg

Detroit Audio Lab

Eco3d

Sons of Sawdust

ReCor Door 

Ohio Materials Marketplace

Louise McRae

Viridian Reclaimed Wood

Futel

The Rockford Brand

Miigwech Aki Deconstruction

Pioneer Millworks

Space Monkey Designs/Fantom Foundry

diederick kraaijeveld

Wallace Detroit Guitars

Upcycling goes upscale: How an Italian designer does it | Stuff.co.nz

Enrico Moreno Cinzano has long had a passion for design, and now he has turned his attention to upcycling. His Manhattan apartment is full of furniture he’s made from found items. The chair he’s sitting in is made of hemp fibre and reclaimed pine timbers.

After an award-winning stint in edgy fashion design, Cinzano is now all about upcycling and using found objects to create his line of furniture.

Source: Upcycling goes upscale: How an Italian designer does it | Stuff.co.nz

Portland Finds Jobs in Its Ban on Demolition – CityLab

 

“I had no idea deconstruction even existed,” Stigen says. “I was working a dead-end job. I had know idea what kind of trade I wanted to get into.” When she heard later about the deconstruction training, she said her first thought was “perfect. Sign me up.” When CityLab spoke with Stigen, she was on her lunch break at a deconstruction site with Lovett Deconstruction, where she secured a job before the training even started.

Source: Portland Finds Jobs in Its Ban on Demolition – CityLab

Bulkhead to Kitchen Cabinets

 

These came from an old bulkhead in Newark, New Jersey. In the water for maybe a 100 years. Now they are cabinets.

 

 

This industrial crane turned home is actually quite nice – Curbed

Canopy & Stars

“It’s taken three years of planning and design, and only three weeks of building, but we got there. What started as a dream has now become a reality,” said Canopy & Stars managing director Tom Dixon. “We hope people enjoy their stays in this amazing building and wake up to the great outdoors feeling they are truly part of this pocket of nature in the city – a real natural high.”

Source: This industrial crane turned home is actually quite nice – Curbed

Redeveloping NYC’s armories: When adaptive reuse and community building bring controversy | 6sqft

The Park Avenue Armory

Today, the well-regarded cultural venue offers season tickets to its cultural events which range from music to architecture and the celebrated Winter Antiques Show. Several recent renovations have kept the historic building in ship shape. But many more armories remain in a state of limbo.

Source: Redeveloping NYC’s armories: When adaptive reuse and community building bring controversy | 6sqft

This Former Slaughterhouse Is A Perfect Example Of The Circular Economy – Industrial

Chuck Sudo/Bisnow Whiner Beer Co. brews its beer at The Plant and opened a taproom whose bar, tables and chairs were made from reclaimed wood.

 

This 94K SF former slaughterhouse was abandoned and slated for demolition when John Edel — through his company Bubbly Dynamics — bought it in 2010 and slowly repurposed the building into a vertical farm and food production business committed to a “circular economy,” a closed loop of recycling and material reuse. Today, the Plant is home to several businesses where the waste stream from one business is repurposed for use by another business elsewhere in the building.

Source: This Former Slaughterhouse Is A Perfect Example Of The Circular Economy – Industrial

Provenance in Kensington launches new line of furniture, lighting – Curbed Philly

Photos by Matt Faisetty for Provenance
Provenance’s new line of desk lamps were created out of old X-ray head lamps. $400.

Its line of desk lamps, created by melding vintage X-ray reflectors with new bases, soon followed. The next step is setting up a showroom within Provenance’s already massive warehouse, so that shoppers can see the furniture and lighting fixtures on display.

One hope is that the new lines of furniture and lighting will help make trips to Provenance a little less, well, overwhelming. Says Lash, “For a lot of people, when they come here the first time, they look at stuff and say, ‘How do I use it?’ Now, we hope they come back and say, ‘Okay, this could work in my home.’”

Source: Provenance in Kensington launches new line of furniture, lighting – Curbed Philly

Next for Detroit? Find uses for 900 vacant manufacturing sites

The Packard Plant’s south water tower stands above the crumbling complex in November 2010, only a few months before it, too, was brought down by scrappers. (Photo: Brian Kaufman, Detroit Free Press)

“Many of these buildings abut residential neighborhoods in some of the city’s most disadvantaged areas,” the report says. “Without a strategic approach to repurposing these properties, they will remain fallow for years to come, posing threats to public health and safety, and undermining Detroit’s recovery.”

Source: Next for Detroit? Find uses for 900 vacant manufacturing sites

Wallace Detroit Guitars Use Reclaimed Motor City Wood For A ‘Cadillac’ Sound | Benzinga

Mark Wallace of Wallace Detroit Guitars

The reclaimed wood used to build Wallace Detroit Guitars — salvaged from buildings in the Motor City — dates as far back as the early 1800s. The handmade guitars are therefore being built with the same vintage, slow-growth wood as instruments made in the golden era of the 1920s, said Wallace Detroit Guitars founder Mark Wallace. “That wood went into guitars, and my wood went into houses,” Wallace said during an interview at Architectural Salvage Warehouse, the nonprofit where he sources maple, ash, walnut and pine. “There’s something fundamentally different about the wood that went into those [vintage] guitars, and that’s what I’m tapping into.”

Source: Wallace Detroit Guitars Use Reclaimed Motor City Wood For A ‘Cadillac’ Sound | Benzinga

Two years after mystery home demolition, Detroit will clean up mess

Patricia Kobylski has been trying to get the City of Detroit to remove a pile of debris left from an illegal demolition in her east-side neighborhood. On Tuesday, she holds an envelope filled with notes on her calls to city officials.  (Photo: Jennifer Dixon, Detroit Free Press)

The property is owned by the Detroit Land Bank Authority, but spokesman Craig Fahle said city officials don’t know who tore it down in January 2015. Fahle said no one pulled a demolition permit, and the Free Press could not find any demolition or asbestos abatement notices on file with the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality for the property on Westphalia between Gratiot and McNichols.

Source: Two years after mystery home demolition, Detroit will clean up mess

Mayor Catherine Pugh Calls For $40 Million Investment Each Year In Deconstruction Projects And Affordable Housing | Town of Morningside Maryland

United Workers, an advocacy group, founded the Baltimore Housing Roundtable in 2013, by bringing 25 different organizations together to confront affordable-housing issues in the city. The group advocates the city to set up a land bank to expedite the conversion of vacant houses and properties to affordable housing and grant priority to ex-offenders for employment and training to work on such projects. It recommended “deconstruction” a process that will allow for more job opportunities and recycling of building materials.

Source: Mayor Catherine Pugh Calls For $40 Million Investment Each Year In Deconstruction Projects And Affordable Housing | Town of Morningside Maryland

Frank Jones Brewery redo saves architectural treasures

Mat Ouellette, assistant project manager for Chinburg Properties, shows an orginal low ceiling area that still remains, before a new level is built, at the Frank Jones Brew Yard in Portsmouth. [Rich Beauchesne/Seacoastonline]

“The quality is amazing,” said Spitzer, about the wood planks with aged patina. Spitzer said a local craftsman will use some of the timbers to make club room fixtures and tables, mill some for shelving and use other old planks for finish work. More of the pine timbers will be reused for counter tops and furniture, he said.

Source: Frank Jones Brewery redo saves architectural treasures

ReUse-apalooza offers new life for ‘junk,’ new jobs for workers, and new challenges for tinkerers – Insider – Story

David Rueve finished creating a new cabinet for the hi-fi and modernizing it more than a week before the ReUse-apalooza deadline. (Photo provided by David Rueve)

“It was a mess when I found it,” Rueve said of the hi-end RCA Victor cabinet hi-fi he recycled. “And it took some work. But now everything works — AM/FM/AFC, phono, tape (which is now set up for iPod, etc.), lights, all tone controls, all eight speakers,” Rueve said. “It sounds amazing. I mean really good.”

Source: ReUse-apalooza offers new life for ‘junk,’ new jobs for workers, and new challenges for tinkerers – Insider – Story

Battling blight with big data | Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Qian Wan , a mechanical engineering Ph.D. candidate at SEAS, and co-author Bradley Pough, a J.D. candidate, provide data-driven recommendations city officials can use to battle urban housing blight.

Their paper, “Digital Analytics and the Fight Against Blight: A Guide for Local Leaders,” examines the problem of urban housing blight, identifies best practice uses of data analytics, and provides data-driven recommendations for municipal officials.

Source: Battling blight with big data | Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

A salvager’s decades-long dream to build a museum of architectural artifacts – Curbed

Preserving part of the the Rivoli Theater in St. Louis Courtesy National Building Arts Center

“I just love old buildings,” Giles said. “It’s a big collection, without a doubt, the largest that I’m aware of, and the idea was to develop it as a comprehensive study collection. The idea has grown into a collection of pieces from all over the country. The history here is a national history.”

Source: A salvager’s decades-long dream to build a museum of architectural artifacts – Curbed

Friendly Giants Built From Recycled Wood Hidden in the Forests of Copenhagen | Colossal

All of the giants are produced from recycled wood, material that was gathered by Dambo and his team from 600 pallets, a shed, an old fence, and various other sources. Using local volunteers to build the works, Dambo then names each sculpture after one of the builders, such as Teddy Friendly . You can see more images of the oversized sculptures on Dambo’s website. (via Bored Panda)

Source: Friendly Giants Built From Recycled Wood Hidden in the Forests of Copenhagen | Colossal

Historic firehouse to hot hotel: Repurposed buildings revel in their colorful pasts – The Washington Post

A rendering of the planned exterior of the Detroit Foundation Hotel inside Detroit’s former Fire Department headquarters. (Vista (Beijing) Digital Technology Co., Ltd. )

“So many places are the same that people crave difference,” Poris says. “New York is like a mall now with the same stores you find at Somerset Collection [in Troy, Mich.], Milan or Hong Kong.”

Source: Historic firehouse to hot hotel: Repurposed buildings revel in their colorful pasts – The Washington Post

Artist Rides Rivers in a Homemade Shantyboat to Learn About the People Who Live on the Banks

Wes Modes, an artist and lecturing professor at UC Santa Cruz and a crew full of creative mates built a shanty boat out of found materials and trash and rode down both the Mississippi River and the Tennessee River over the course of the past two summers. The collective purpose of these journeys is to learn about the people who live on and around the banks and the about the ecology of the rivers.

Source: Artist Rides Rivers in a Homemade Shantyboat to Learn About the People Who Live on the Banks

Wedge-shaped Acute House reuses materials from demolished cottage : TreeHugger

© Nic Granleese

Rather than discarding all the old materials, the architects strove to salvage and reuse as much of the old house as possible: wood boards, fencing, doorknobs and vents. The architects say: Like fragile museum artefacts, these were carefully removed, labelled, stored and re-installed in their original location on a new mount that not only highlights their charms by contrast but allows the house to live again in a new way.

Source: Wedge-shaped Acute House reuses materials from demolished cottage : TreeHugger

Old grain elevator in St. Anthony comes down | Ag/Business News | rexburgstandardjournal.com

A deconstruction crew, including a man with a chainsaw atop a crane bucket, slowly saws down a grain elevator that’s stood as a landmark of sort on the south side of St. Anthony for more than 100 years.  Joyce Edlefsen

Trost’s Feed and Seed started life in 1901 or 1902 as Miller Brothers. It burned down almost as soon as it was completed, but the brothers rebuilt it the next year. According to a sign painted on the Miller elevator, it dealt in grain, flour, produce, eggs, feed stuff, salt and coal.The Black Elevator, nicknamed for its dark, oxidized wood color, apparently was used at about the same time, and seemed to have been owned by the same people as the other elevators in town.

Source: Old grain elevator in St. Anthony comes down | Ag/Business News | rexburgstandardjournal.com

Urban Institute Links Urban Blight and Public Health – CityLab

A man walks through a vacant lot in the Northern Liberties neighborhood of Philadelphia. (Matt Rourke/AP)

In other words, rather than wielding code enforcement as a way to punish offenders or extract revenue, Schilling argues that the wellbeing of residents ought to be restored as housing policy’s central purpose. “We need to return housing back to its roots,” he says. “Housing codes were initially framed as a way to protect public health. While there’s still some of that, it’s so often become secondary.”

Source: Urban Institute Links Urban Blight and Public Health – CityLab

Scrap Exchange seeking to finish leasing of Lakewood building | The Herald Sun

Ann May Woodward, executive director of The Scrap Exchange, is photographed in Lakewood Shopping Center in March 2016. The Scrap Exchange plans to purchase 10 acres of the Shoppes at Lakewood center to establish a Reuse Arts District.

Ann May Woodward, executive director of The Scrap Exchange, is photographed in Lakewood Shopping Center in March 2016. The Scrap Exchange plans to purchase 10 acres of the Shoppes at Lakewood center to establish a Reuse Arts District. Kaitlin McKeown The Herald-Sun

A stable collection of paying tenants will bring more traffic to the shopping center, and allow The Scrap Exchange to implement other parts of the Reuse Arts District, Shark said. The Scrap Exchange is seeking to redevelop the Lakewood area without driving out the people who live there, one of the pitfalls of neighborhood improvement. The shopping center already is facing pressure from potential developers, particularly the southern part, which includes Food Lion and several other businesses.

Source: Scrap Exchange seeking to finish leasing of Lakewood building | The Herald Sun

Rejuvenation Opens NYC Store

Rejuvenation was founded to help customers restoring old houses, but most today spurn interiors that reference a single period or style. “We decided to help people live eclectically,” explains Alex Bellos, a West Elm veteran who is now senior vice president and general manager. “Designers are looking for unique pieces with a story behind them, and we have things they can build a room around.”

Source: Rejuvenation Opens NYC Store

Spend a Luxury Night in a Converted Pigsty (North Yorkshire) – Urban Ghosts Media

(Image: John Lindsay; converted pigsty in North Yorkshire, England)

According to the Landmark Trust, which restored the now converted pigsty overlooking Robin Hood’s Bay, in North Yorkshire, to its former glory: “Once really a sty, Squire Barry of Fyling Hall is said to have been inspired by the classical architecture he had seen in the Mediterranean during his travels in the 1880s when building this home for his pigs.”

Source: Spend a Luxury Night in a Converted Pigsty (North Yorkshire) – Urban Ghosts Media

Wallace Detroit Guitars Announces Limited Edition ‘Firehouse Series’, Handcrafted with Reclaimed Wood from Iconic Detroit Firehouse | Guitar Girl Magazine

Aged Maple and Pine Salvaged from Floor of Old Detroit Landmark Inspires
Twelve One of a Kind, Timeless Instruments

The first guitars released from the firehouse wood will be a pair made of pine and featuring a brand new offset body shaped, designed by Wallace Detroit Guitars. Eye-catching and comfortable to wear, the smoothly rounded dual ‘horns’ cut a classic profile on-stage or in the studio. “Pine is a lighter, softer wood with more air inside of it as compared to common guitar lumbers like ash or poplar,” says Wallace. “That allows it to resonate a bit more for a nice prolonged tone.” Pine has only begun to see wide use in guitar making within the last ten years, so these guitars present a unique opportunity to own a pine guitar with the sound and feel of vintage wood.

Source: Wallace Detroit Guitars Announces Limited Edition ‘Firehouse Series’, Handcrafted with Reclaimed Wood from Iconic Detroit Firehouse | Guitar Girl Magazine

Norwalk Reflector: Ohio Materials Marketplace to find reuse and recycle solutions

 

“With statewide access to thousands of Ohio’s businesses, communities and other organizations, Ohio EPA’s Division of Environmental & Financial Assistance (DEFA) is well positioned to bring members together in this modern online marketplace,” Director Butler said. “This new service positions Ohio as a leader in the circular economy, helping remove materials from the waste stream, promoting jobs and allowing for better efficiency and savings in the processes of creating goods and services.”

Source: Norwalk Reflector: Ohio Materials Marketplace to find reuse and recycle solutions