Upcycled stools by designer Curro Claret and Arrels Fundació for yök Casa + Cultura : TreeHugger

With a simple piece of metal, wood picked up from the street and a desire to create and transform, since 2010 a group of homeless people construct stools, lamps and other pieces of furniture. The project has won awards; however, until now, the most important recognition has been a collaboration with the company Camper to decorate one of its shops with the furniture.

via Upcycled stools by designer Curro Claret and Arrels Fundació for yök Casa + Cultura : TreeHugger.

Floating on Dry Land: 17 Derelict Houseboats Find New Home | Urbanist

ceuvel project lifting place

The complex is made up of an array of formerly-floating homes that are no longer seaworthy but can still be fixed up and find a second life on land. As PopUpCity reports, “The imaginatively retro-fitted houseboats that make up the creative quarter are all placed around a winding bamboo walkway and the surrounding landscape consists of plants that clean the soil.”

 

Café de Ceuvel – Crowdfunding from Café de Ceuvel on Vimeo.

via Floating on Dry Land: 17 Derelict Houseboats Find New Home | Urbanist.

Boston/SF News | Articles and Archives | PCA and Beacon Communities Complete Adaptive Reuse of National Historic Landmark

According to David Chilinski of Prellwitz Chilinski Associates, the solution required a new look at the property and its potential. “We saw the same obstacles to reusing these buildings that others encountered. The community wanted to see the architecture and the incredible history it represents preserved and blended back into the town fabric. So we looked for ways to open up and unlock all creative possibilities both inside the structures and on the grounds of the property.”

via Boston/SF News | Articles and Archives | PCA and Beacon Communities Complete Adaptive Reuse of National Historic Landmark.

With recycling, Re Store becomes Ballard Reuse | Pacific NW | The Seattle Times

Joel Blaschke, co-owner of Ballard Reuse, shows off a lounge chair made from salvaged fir and crafted by fellow Ballard Reuse staffer James Taylor. Blaschke is sitting atop a pile of salvaged fir.

Joel Blaschke, co-owner of Ballard Reuse, shows off a lounge chair made from salvaged fir and crafted by fellow Ballard Reuse staffer James Taylor. Blaschke is sitting atop a pile of salvaged fir.

With the new business license comes a new partnership; Ballard Reuse will be teaming up with Seattle ReCreative, a local nonprofit with a mission quite similar to Ballard Reuse, but with a focus: the arts. Fiscally sponsored by the Phinney Neighborhood Association, the group aims to have art classes and workshops for both children and adults, as well as exhibition space.

via With recycling, Re Store becomes Ballard Reuse | Pacific NW | The Seattle Times.

Salvage operation at Domino Sugar factory tops $10M as developers look to rescue industrial artifacts – NY Daily News

NYC PAPERS OUT. Social media use restricted to low res file max 184 x 128 pixels and 72 dpi

“The demolition contractors wanted to kill me because I kept finding things I wanted to keep,” said Lisa Switkin, a landscape architect with James Corner Field Operations. The firm has been tapped by developer Two Trees Management Company to design the park.

The salvage operation is now more important than ever, as Two Trees prepares to raze the majority of the factory buildings. And the salvation efforts may help assuage the anger of some neighborhood residents, who have long opposed the redevelopment of the site on the grounds of historical significance.

NYC PAPERS OUT. Social media use restricted to low res file max 184 x 128 pixels and 72 dpi

via Salvage operation at Domino Sugar factory tops $10M as developers look to rescue industrial artifacts – NY Daily News.

Thermal Bridging Guide Provides Energy Efficiency Solutions – Green Building Elements

Building Envelope Thermal Analysis Guide

The Building Envelope Thermal Analysis (BETA) Guide outlines how to effectively account for thermal bridging and is backed up by an extensive catalogue of thermal performance data.  This information is essential for practitioners evaluating building envelope thermal performance.

Researchers and regulators will be interested in the sections focused on market transformation, which includes an evaluation of cost effectiveness and energy savings in common large building types.

via Green Building Elements | From brick and mortar shops to city planning, we cover sustainable trends in construction, renovation, and more..

Hearts and Sparks Productions | Here It Is (The small house Portlandia video)

 

Friends drop by to see another one of those small houses. Originally made with great affection for a Portlandia film festival, the video has continued to have a life of it’s own online, striking a cord with the growing tiny house community.  It has been featured in blogs all across the country including The Atlantic Cities (mistakenly attributed to the Portlandia tv show), The Mother Nature Network (where it’s compared/contrasted with an actual Portlandia sketch) and Curbed (where it’s described as “making the Portlandia writers wonder why they didn’t get to it first.”)  .

via Hearts and Sparks Productions | Here It Is (The small house Portlandia video).

ReuseConex 2014 | October 23-25, 2014 | Austin, Texas, USA

While it’s true that the “3Rs” have become a catalyzing movement of our times, the “reuse” part of this waste management trilogy is often overlooked. Thanks to ReuseConex, the International Reuse Conference & Expo, this is about to change!

If you work with a local reuse organization, if you shop at thrift stores or online resellers, if you buy or sell reusables, if you’re interested in green-collar jobs, and if you’re concerned about climate change – then join us for ReuseConex!

The theme for ReuseConex 2014 is Innovate. Transform. Sustain. — and we hope you’ll join us while we explore new methods and replicable models to make reuse work for your community. At ReuseConex you will find out more about the “triple bottom line” benefits of reuse, learn from and share best practices, and network with leaders in the reuse industry. Join us!

via ReuseConex – International Reuse Conference & Expo.

‘In’ with the old, in with the new: adaptive reuse at Gantry by Bates Smart | Architecture And Design

Comprising four new 5-6 storey apartment buildings and extensive landscaping over 18,500sqm, Gantry integrates new residential buildings within refurbished historic elements such as the 1920’s Motor Car Works and Fowler Pottery warehouse facades, and the gable ends of the historic High Bay Building.

via ‘In’ with the old, in with the new: adaptive reuse at Gantry by Bates Smart | Architecture And Design.

New Project Uses Drones to Cut Construction Waste & Increase Reuse & Recycling in Wales – Waste Management World

New Project to Cut Construction Waste & Increase Reuse & Recycling in Wales

Drones

CEW said that it is implementing the latest technology to carry out the project, including photography drones (pictured) and design modelling.

A drone from Cardiff-based Heli-Eye is being used at various points throughout the project to easily and quickly capture aerial images, whilst Arup and Gillard Associates will be using BIM modelling to look at how design changes might affect reductions in waste.

via New Project Uses Drones to Cut Construction Waste & Increase Reuse & Recycling in Wales – Waste Management World.

Choosing Deconstruction Over Demolition | Iowa Public Radio

Siobhan Spain’s brother installing reused barn wood in her kitchen.

Credit Courtesy of Siobhan Spain

 

Spain’s family deconstructed their barn instead of demolishing it. When you demolish a building, it gets torn down as quickly as possible without regard to what happens to the discarded materials. When you deconstruct a building, you take it apart piece by piece and try to resell or reuse everything you can.

via Choosing Deconstruction Over Demolition | Iowa Public Radio.

Southwest Airlines upcycles 80,000 leather seats into bags, shoes and balls | Guardian Sustainable Business | theguardian.com

Southwest is partnering with Kenyan social enterprise Alive and Kicking to make footballs from seat covers, but are projects like this viable? Photograph: Southwest Airlines

So Southwest joined the international upcycling trend. Partnering with upcycler Looptworks in Portland, Oregon, the airline will turn a portion of its leather seats into tote bags, duffle bags and backpacks that the airline will buy back to to use as gifts at events.

“The water conserved by making goods using old leather rather than virgin leather is enormous,” says Looptworks co-founder Scott Hamlin. “For each bag, 4,000 gallons of water is saved. In addition, there’s a CO2 reduction of up to 82%.”

via Southwest Airlines upcycles 80,000 leather seats into bags, shoes and balls | Guardian Sustainable Business | theguardian.com.

BMRA DeconExpo

DECON ’15 IS THE BUILDING MATERIALS REUSE ASSOCIATION’S CONFERENCE ON DECONSTRUCTION, BUILDING MATERIALS REUSE, AND C&D RECYCLING.

Join us for a lively, informative conference on the latest in deconstruction technology and materials-reuse applications and help choose hands-on learning excursions, top speakers, networking events, business growth strategies, and more!

via BMRA DeconExpo.

16 Fantastic Examples of Adaptive Reuse in Restaurant Design – Eating Pretty – Curbed National

Curbed.com had a great list of adaptive reuse examples. Check it out!

Starbucks design director Liz Muller worked with local artists to create a concept store inside a historic bank vault in Amsterdam. Via Dezeen.

The restaurant at Chile’s eco-tourism resort Espejo De Luna was built inside a seafaring vessel washed ashore.

16 Fantastic Examples of Adaptive Reuse in Restaurant Design – Eating Pretty – Curbed National.

Harvesting barns: Randy Smith salvages, repurposes wood | Zanesville Times Recorder | zanesvilletimesrecorder.com

Randy Smith and his two-man work from the hay-loft to carefully dissemble an 1910 era barn in a northwest corner of Marion County on Friday, June 20, 2014. The white poplar exterior planks will be shipped to a client in North Carolina who is re-constructing a turn-of-the-century farm site. James Miller/The Marion Star

Randy Smith and his two-man work from the hay-loft to carefully dissemble an 1910 era barn in a northwest corner of Marion County on Friday, June 20, 2014. The white poplar exterior planks will be shipped to a client in North Carolina who is re-constructing a turn-of-the-century farm site.

James Miller/The Marion Star / James Miller/The Marion Star

via Harvesting barns: Randy Smith salvages, repurposes wood | Zanesville Times Recorder | zanesvilletimesrecorder.com.

Portland must do more to preserve old houses: Guest opinion | OregonLive.com

hoiuse.JPG

A group of neighborhood residents recently saved Northwest Portland’s Goldsmith House from demolition. ( James Reddick/The Oregonian)

According to The Architectural Heritage Center, an estimated 389 demolitions took place in 2013 in neighborhoods across the city; it’s rumored that a demo per work day is happening in 2014. They have some ideas as places to start responding to the demolition epidemic:

(1) Require advance notice to surrounding property owners and residents. Right now, notice is only required by the city when more than one new house is proposed. There’s no notice/delay when a demo application and the replacement house permit are filed the same day. The city should require notice, and time for response, across the board.

(2) Change the definition of “demolition” in the city’s development code – a big problem is that any demolition that leaves any portion of a house still standing (such as a partial foundation wall) is called an “alteration” or “remodel,” not a demolition (which are seriously under-counted, as a result.) More typically, many other jurisdictions use “at least 50% of a structure remains standing” as the primary criterion for an alteration/remodel. If that’s reasonable enough for other cities and counties, it should be acceptable for Portland.

(3) Houses that are obviously historic (but unprotected) are those that have long been listed on the city’s 1983 Historic Resources Inventory, but many houses have reached the age of 50-plus since then. We propose a mandatory 120 day delay for houses on the HRI or at least 50-plus years old. These are likely the ones that need time for investigating alternatives to demolition.

(4) Require that existing front and side yard setbacks be maintained for the new house(s). One major concern is that after a demolition, a new house is not only usually bigger, but it covers much more of the lot, often changing the streetscape substantially. If the front- and side-yard setbacks stay the same for the new house, the streetscape remains more like its traditional neighbors.

via Portland must do more to preserve old houses: Guest opinion | OregonLive.com.

Breaking down deconstruction: What Detroit gained from dismantling instead of destroying | Community Progress Blog | Center for Community Progress

Detroit has a rich history and that can be seen in the housing materials we are trying to save. Bricks and wood particularly are incredibly valuable in these homes and it would be awful to see them end up in landfills.

Site selection is key to the success of deconstruction. It is important to select areas in neighborhoods where community members will remain engaged and will keep an eye on properties. This will reduce vandalism and burned materials, which can make this process challenging.

via Breaking down deconstruction: What Detroit gained from dismantling instead of destroying | Community Progress Blog | Center for Community Progress.

Jury finds Recology cheated in waste diversion bonus program | SF Politics

The primary way this occurred, according to attorney David Anton, involved misclassifying demolition and construction waste. Under state law, ground up raw construction material that is labeled as “fines” can legally be used to cover up the top of a landfill – in order to prevent pests, fires, and odors, for example. When construction waste is ground up and used this way, it counts as “alternative daily cover” – like a layer of frosting on a giant cake of garbage – and strangely enough, the state allows waste disposal companies to count that frosting as “diverted waste” even though it’s actually part of the landfill.

The lawsuit claimed that Recology tried to count a great many tons of its construction and demolition waste as “fines” when in reality it should have been labeled just plain garbage, because the tons of stuff that they were shipping to the Solano County landfill wasn’t being processed to a fine enough grade to comply with state requirements for what constitutes “fines.”

via Jury finds Recology cheated in waste diversion bonus program | SF Politics.

Recycling becomes upcycling as Derbyshire charity turns old furniture into new chic items | Derby Telegraph

Anneliese Bates with a bar created from an old piano.

Encore Reuse operates from Henmore Trading Estate, in Mayfield Road, and recycles old furniture, stopping it from going to landfill or from being dumped.

Good-quality furniture and household goods, which are donated, are sold in the warehouse.

But the charity makes itself sustainable by running an upcycling shop, located within the premises, called Vintage Green.

via Recycling becomes upcycling as Derbyshire charity turns old furniture into new chic items | Derby Telegraph.

Kevin Rose Infuriates Portland Over Plans to Demolish Historic Home

Kevin Rose Infuriates Portland Over Plans to Demolish Historic Home

Rose’s plan is so controversial that over 800 Portlanders have signed a petition begging him to stop, lamenting over the loss of a historic structure.

The house was one of the first homes in Willamette Heights, built in 1892. There are pictures of the house from the 1890s, perched alone in grandeur on the recently logged hillside rising from Balch Creek. The years since then have seen multiple owners, and the house has been the site of many neighborhood gatherings, including annual Easter egg hunts — the sort of hunts and gatherings at which neighbors meet while their children play, and lifelong relationships are formed all around.

The house has been well-loved and cared for. To be sure, it’s over 100 years old, like many of the homes in Willamette Heights. For many of us, that has meant upgrading wiring or plumbing, or even replacing foundations. We understand that you may be now facing those sorts of costs, and we can assure you that they’re worth it. There’s no greater value than in preserving the character of the neighborhood.

via Kevin Rose Infuriates Portland Over Plans to Demolish Historic Home.

Finding Reclaimed Materials for Bar Tables for the Basement Pub in Portland, Oregon – Sara Badiali

Finding Reclaimed Materials for Bar Tables – by Sara Badiali

The larger picture of building material reuse encompasses policy, education, and awareness. In my practice, I can spend months not even looking at actual materials.  This week I’ve been overjoyed to get my hands dirty in the local marketplace for reclaimed materials.

 

Picture It

My friends are updating the interior design of a Portland bar called the Basement Pub.  When they mentioned that the tables are going to be constructed of reclaimed wood I immediately offered my services.  My love of reclaimed materials is matched only by my passion for research (and possibly spreadsheets). This is my approach to finding reclaimed materials for a large project with a limited budget.

 

Lookingbasement_1

Scouting reuse centers or salvage businesses is my first step. I spend time online looking at the type of business that sell salvaged materials to get a feel of their prices. More and more business who deal in reclaimed materials are popping up these days. The reclaimed building material market ranges from one-offs on Craigslist to boutique style specialty stores. The prices for materials vary wildly in range.  My approach is to match the client’s style and budget, allotted time for the project, the resources available, to available materials in the marketplace. In this case, we have a month to scout materials and people available with skills to turn raw materials into tables.  Our budget is small and the tables are only one part of a large remodel project.

 

Time

Time is a key factor in using reclaimed materials. The more time to plan a project and scout for materials, the better the outcome and the more enjoyable the experience.  For the Basement Pub’s tables, we want to fall between semi raw and processed materials.  We don’t want to harvest our own because we are not a licensed and bonded company.  Anyone can harvest materials, but the property owner is liable for any accidents or issues that may occur.  As a property owner, it is good practice to allow only insured companies deconstruct or remove materials.  We also don’t want to spend time and labor on denailing lumber.  We do have craftspeople who can build, but not to mill. This project falls square in the middle of perfect for the available skill set and allotted amount of time.

 

Organizing Resources I

The first tab of my resources spreadsheet is organized by local type of business, inventory and cost. Since we are on a limited budget, I start with the reuse centers.  There are over 850 Habitat for Humanity Restores in the country (last time I checked) so this is an easy source along with local nonprofit reuse centers. Then I start looking at the small architectural salvage businesses. I check for independent contractors that have a website with both reclaimed materials and urban tree removal. Tree and stump removal business often overlap in milling street trees and reclaimed wood.  Larger and more expensive reclaimed material operations typically have a solid web presence with an extensive list of inventory. I add these business to my list and give them to the client as a reference point. They tend to be pricey, along price lines of the upper echelon of the design goods stores.  I put off checking in with demolition companies because that usually means I have to make phone calls, but sometimes they have great leads. Then of course there are deconstruction companies, if they sell their own salvage then they go on the resource list.

 

Client Communication

Good communication with the client is important to shake out expectations in a project. For example, it took me three conversations about the tables to learn that they don’t want them created out of Douglas Fir. In the Pacific North West, Doug Fir is the most prolific reclaimed wood. There are entire old growth forests captured in the structures of Portland so it’s the easiest to find.  With this information, I am less likely to look for salvage from the interior of buildings.

Basement Pub Local 1028

 

Organizing Resources II

The second tab of my spreadsheet is the materials themselves. Armed with the knowledge that I am not going for salvaged interiors, I am looking for unique supplies.  My first thought is reclaimed cedar fencing. On occasion the reuse center I where I used to work would get a load of cedar fencing. Tables made from cedar would be dazzling (but I would have to hurdle the milling issue).  For items like these, the only local resource is Craigslist.  In Portland we are lucky enough to have an online reclaimed materials website called Boneyard Northwest, but it is not yet the materials juggernaut that is craigslist.

On Craigslist I find many items that would make good tables. Although I am looking under the “Materials” section of craigslist, the “Farm and Garden” section also has reclaimed items.  My finds range from: Reclaimed hardwood bleachers, and tropical wood reclaimed from truck beds, to rough table tops already made from reclaimed wood (Doug Fir of course).  I email these places to check if the inventory is still available. I list pictures of the materials along with dates and prices. I find the top seven to ten items that I think would fit the project, wait for the sellers to confirm the inventory and send my list off to the client.

The next step is to go see the reclaimed materials. I will do this with the primary craftsperson. Who, in this case, is the architect who will be designing and building the tables.  My feeling is she will also be managing those of us who show up as volunteer labor (the perks of volunteering for a pub are delicious).

 

To be Continued

These are the first steps in finding and working with reclaimed materials. If none of the Craigslist items are suitable then I will widen my search by making phone calls and contacting my friends in the field.  If all goes well we will start making the tables in a couple of weeks. Stay tuned for more adventures in finding and working with reclaimed building materials for the Basement Pub in Portland, Oregon!

James Lee House – James Lee House Renovation – House Beautiful

Photos courtesy of The James Lee House

A historic house in Memphis was sold for a buck and turned into a bed and breakfast within a year. Jose and Jennifer Velázquez had dreams of opening their own B&B, and after 24 years they found the perfect place — The James Lee House, an abandoned and rundown Victorian built in 1848 that’s listed on the National Historic Register.

via James Lee House – James Lee House Renovation – House Beautiful.

Abandoned Belgian Town Now Covered in Street Art

Photo: Randi Sokoloff for the Guardian

Photo: Randi Sokoloff for the Guardian.

For two decades Doel’s remaining residents have been embroiled in a battle with a state-funded corporation that is seeking to raze it. The townspeople also have the EU’s strict environmental laws on their side thanks to the large population of swallows that has taken up residence in the dilapidated town. But they also have something else working in their favor: street art.

via Abandoned Belgian Town Now Covered in Street Art.

Demolition ban could require recycling of older Vancouver homes – British Columbia – CBC News

New regulations could soon restrict the demolition of older Vancouver homes and require at least 75 per cent of the waste material be recycled or reused.

New regulations could soon restrict the demolition of older Vancouver homes and require at least 75 per cent of the waste material be recycled or reused. (CBC)

The City of Vancouver could soon ban the demolition of homes built before 1940, and require anyone planning to knock one down to deconstruct it piece by piece and sort the materials for recycling.The proposal follows increasing concerns about the demolition of heritage and character homes in Vancouver.

On average three homes are demolished in Vancouver everyday, of which 40 per cent are pre-1940s homes that give many neighbourhoods their character.The proposed regulation would require recycling or reuse of 75 per cent of the waste from a pre-1940s home and 90 per cent of the waste from one which has been identified as a character home.

via Demolition ban could require recycling of older Vancouver homes – British Columbia – CBC News.

Wineka column: Historic Salisbury’s salvage store also brings new life to former ice plant | Salisbury Post

Historic Salisbury Foundation Executive Director Brian Davis stands among a treasure trove of old doors, windows and related hardware that was salvaged out of old homes that were to be demolished. The items are stored in the 1912 Ice House on Horah Street. The HSF sells the items to building contractors, homeowners, artists or anyone who is interested in the materials. The monies raised go to benefit the foundation.JON C. LAKEY / SALISBURY POST

Historic Salisbury Foundation Executive Director Brian Davis stands among a treasure trove of old doors, windows and related hardware that was salvaged out of old homes that were to be demolished. The items are stored in the 1912 Ice House on Horah Street. The HSF sells the items to building contractors, homeowners, artists or anyone who is interested in the materials. The monies raised go to benefit the foundation.

via Wineka column: Historic Salisbury’s salvage store also brings new life to former ice plant | Salisbury Post.

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP | Colossal

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

Brazilian artist Henrique Oliveira recently completed work on his largest installation to date titled Transarquitetônica at Museu de Arte Contemporânea da Universidade in São Paulo. As with much of his earlier sculptural and installation work the enormous piece is built from tapumes, a kind of temporary siding made from inexpensive wood that is commonly used to obscure construction sites. Oliveira uses the repurposed wood pieces as a skin nailed to an organic framework that looks intentionally like a large root system.

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP wood installation architecture

via Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP | Colossal.

Architectural Salvage Warehouse of Detroit – Culture Features – Detroit Metro Times

Photo: N/A, License: N/A

The good people at the nonprofit Architectural Salvage Warehouse of Detroit do more than save great architectural details in buildings they painstakingly deconstruct, though they’re well-known for that. According to Chris Rutherford, executive director of ASW, explains that the group’s mission also includes waste diversion: Without Rutherford and his teams, every item for sale in the warehouse would have gone in a landfill.

via Architectural Salvage Warehouse of Detroit – Culture Features – Detroit Metro Times.

OnMilwaukee.com Milwaukee Buzz: Deconstructing the NML building project from the inside

Most everything that can be recycled has been recycled.

“Our goal is to salvage and recycle a minimum of seventy-five percent,” says Wollenzein. “We’re on track to be able to do that and more.”

Some of the carpeting that had come out of the building, actually a lot of it, got sent down to a third party and they cleaned it up and are reusing it in other projects,” he says, as we stand outside the now-four-story shell of a building, preparing to take a look inside.

“All the furniture that came out of the building has been taken away by a third party and is being resold. So has a lot of the equipment that was in the building, that is all being used and purposed.

“As of when I visited last week, 67,000 tons of granite, masonry and brick was recycled. So was 6,400 tons of steel, aluminum and other metals; 10,000 tons of wood; and 53 tons of carpet.

via OnMilwaukee.com Milwaukee Buzz: Deconstructing the NML building project from the inside.

Indiana cities getting money to fight urban blight | WISH-TV

Gary will receive $6.6 million of the initial amount. A team spent several months collecting data on blighted structures throughout the northwest Indiana city.

Besides demolishing vacant and abandoned homes and buildings, the federal program also provides loans to help homeowners avoid foreclosure.

Officials estimate about 4,000 blighted properties will be torn down across the state.

via Indiana cities getting money to fight urban blight | WISH-TV.

Former ReNew director cleans out warehouse – Brattleboro Reformer

Deconstruction Works owner members (L-R) Erich Kruger and Michael Weitzner work to clean up ReNew Salvage.(Kayla Rice/Reformer)

Deconstruction Works owner members (L-R) Erich Kruger and Michael Weitzner work to clean up ReNew Salvage. (Kayla Rice/Reformer)

“It’s kind of bittersweet. It didn’t have to happen this way,” he said while taking a break from his work. “It’s a mess right now, but at least I know it is being done right.”

After being let go by the ReNew board, Kruger continued working in the trade and last year he helped start Deconstruction Works, which became a worker-owned cooperative this year.

Deconstruction Works owner members (L-R) Erich Kruger and Michael Weitzner work to clean up ReNew Salvage.(Kayla Rice/Reformer)Deconstruction Works owner members (L-R) Erich Kruger and Michael Weitzner work to clean up ReNew Salvage. (Kayla Rice/Reformer)

viaFormer ReNew director cleans out warehouse – Brattleboro Reformer.

Oopsmark Upcycles Old Tires into Classy Bicycle Wine Rack for Vegans | Inhabitat

oopsmark, bicycle wine rack, vegan bicycle wine rack, wine rack, upcycled bicycle tires, bicycle tires, tires wine rack, bicycles, bicycle, bikes, reader submitted content

Oopsmark settled on using recycled bicycle tires sourced from a local recycling initiative called Consortium Echo-Logique. Held together with gold studs, this minimalist upcycled bicycle wine rack offers an eco-friendly and chic way to carry your favorite bottle of wine around town.

via Oopsmark Upcycles Old Tires into Classy Bicycle Wine Rack for Vegans | Inhabitat – Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building.