Reclaimed Lath Home Design Ideas, Pictures, Remodel and Decor

This wood is the lath (as in lath and plaster) from the same walls that were taken down to complete the remodel. It was sanded and refinished to remove nails and other problems, highlighting the hundred-year-old beauty of the reclaimed wood.

The 25-foot long light fixture is made of reclaimed lath boards undulating along the entire length of the attic bedroom. The light source is warm white LED’s on a dimmer, so the homeowner can adjust the brightness for a dramatic glow at night.

Source: Reclaimed Lath Home Design Ideas, Pictures, Remodel and Decor

Baltimore rowhouse wood gets new life as furniture – Baltimore Sun

Peter Martin, carpenter, Sandtown Millworks, sands a large piece of wood salvaged in Baltimore. The reclaimed wood is used to make furniture. Kim Hairston, Baltimore Sun

When Bolster started renovating rowhouses 20 years ago, he noticed that very few people in the industry saved the wood they pulled out of the homes. “It all ended up in landfills,” he said. “I started saving some of the wood because the character of it was so much more fantastic than new wood.” Some of the first creations to come from Bolster’s shop were made of wood salvaged from houses in Baltimore’s Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood — hence the name. “Many of our designs are driven by the wood dimensions we pulled from those rowhouses,” he said. During the past couple of years, Bolster said, his furniture business has snowballed, rivaling his renovation company.

Source: Baltimore rowhouse wood gets new life as furniture – Baltimore Sun

Deconstruction vs. Demolition: Portland, Oregon’s Potential for Groundbreaking Health and Safety Studies in Building Demolition – By Sara Badiali

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Deconstruction vs. Demolition: Portland, Oregon’s Potential for Groundbreaking Health and Safety Studies in Building Demolition – By Sara Badiali

Demolition: deliberate destruction of a building or other structure.[1]

Deconstruction: the systematic dismantling of a building in order to recover the maximum amount of materials for reuse and recycling.[2]

 

The City of Portland is poised to contribute to the study of health and safety in building removal. The Deconstruction Ordinance will take effect starting October 2016. The ordinance outlines single family homes built before 1916 must be deconstructed for material reuse.  Deconstructing buildings will greatly lower greenhouse gas emissions and material disposal in landfills over traditional demolition.  Deconstruction not only provides access to unique materials but also viable building materials that would otherwise go to waste. The Deconstruction Ordinance will provide the first ever opportunity for side by side comparisons of demolition verses building deconstruction for environmental health and safety measures.

Portland presents an environment of blistering-fast paced development, houses upwards of one-hundred years old, and established demolition and deconstruction companies. Residential interest in environmental health and safety is at an all-time high due to incidents pertaining to lead and radon, and unprecedented housing demolition. Portland is also home to multiple academic organizations specializing in environmental health issues, health sciences, urban planning, and architecture.

By hosting studies of building removals, new information will lead to a better understanding of hazardous material reductions and ultimately best practices. Consequently research in Portland could be the catalyst for laws regulating more than standards for lead dust fall, but also heavy metals, asbestos, and water contamination in demolition practices.

 

Hazardous Particulates in Buildings

When a building is demolished, the mechanical action of crushing creates particulates of dust from the building’s materials. These particulates enter the air and spread throughout the environment.  Machines repeatedly driving over the worksite further circulate these particulates. Atmospheric conditions like wind can exacerbate the spread of dust.

There are currently no U.S. federal regulatory standards for lead dust fall, exterior settled dust, or dust-suppression methods in housing demolition.[3] There are also very few demolition dust fall related studies, or inquiries into whether hand dismantling structures (deconstruction) reduces the spread of potentially hazardous air particulates.

Lead and asbestos are by far the most studied and discussed of hazardous materials attributed to buildings. Asbestos is proven to cause the fatal diseases asbestosis, pleural disease, and lung cancer. According to a 2011 survey by U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control, over 37 million homes have lead based paint somewhere in the building. [4] The majority of hazardous lead is in homes built before 1978.

One study indicates that 37 billion square feet of building components are coated with deteriorated lead-based paint.[5] A 2008 study of lead exposures in U.S. children found that “Exposure to lead can occur from many pathways and sources, but housing is the main pathway of exposure in the U.S., accounting for approximately 70% of childhood lead poisoning cases.”[6]

There are other less well known potential health hazards in buildings.  Arsenic and heavy metals like chromium, copper, iron, and manganese are harmful to humans. These heavy metals are thought to be from use of pressure treated wood manufactured before 2003.  Mercury is a common toxic waste present in buildings, including gas pressure regulators, boiler heating systems, and thermostats. According to the Massachusetts Water Resource Authority “The amount of mercury present in one mercury thermometer is enough to pollute 5 million gallons of water.”[7] That is the capacity to contaminate a 20-acre lake with enough mercury to result in a fish consumption warning, says Wastecap of Massachusetts. Benzene, a chemical related to natural gas, is also found harmful to humans. Environmental dust is especially problematic for people who suffer from asthma.

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This Toronto design studio uses upcycling to turn trash into treasure – The Globe and Mail

Fugitive Glue has made a variety of items from light fixtures, to stools, to an art installation in 2012. (Samson Wong)

“[It’s] where we isolate a waste stream, collect batches of that base material, come up with a design and create products,” says Jano Badovinac, 39, the mastermind behind the six-year-old company. In this case, “We’d collect propane tanks from decommissioning stations, clean them, cut them down, weld them into something.”

Source: This Toronto design studio uses upcycling to turn trash into treasure – The Globe and Mail

Construction waste puts Metro Vancouver recycling facilities at capacity – British Columbia – CBC News

 

Harvest Power CEO Christian Kasper says his New Westminster construction and demolition waste facility is operating at capacity. (Jared Thomas/CBC)

Waste from construction and demolition sites are piling up so quickly that recycling facilities say they’re having a tough time keeping up with demand.

“This [New Westminster] facility receives about 500 tones per day, that’s our maximum permitted capacity and that is what we are taking in right now.”

Source: Construction waste puts Metro Vancouver recycling facilities at capacity – British Columbia – CBC News

Recycling the Past to Build the Future — Environmental Protection

Tacoma started by cleaning the waterways, polluted from decades of industry. New strategies, new technologies, such as "fingerprinting" of pollutants in the water, and new processes were developed, in partnership between UW Tacoma and the city. (Economic Development Board for Tacoma-Pierce County photo)

Tacoma’s downtown had character. And instead of wiping it out, the city reclaimed it, just as it had reclaimed the waterways. In an effort to be sustainable and adaptive while keeping that character, the city stressed creatively repurposing and developing older and historic buildings, which other cities, including Seattle, had been tearing down for new development. Almost overnight, Tacoma became a leader in green building and creative reuse.

Source: Recycling the Past to Build the Future — Environmental Protection

From red-hot steel to red-hot tech: reinventing an old industrial site — NewsWorks

RIDC President Don Smith (right) and Tim White (center) say they’re eager to see development finally begin across the 178-acre LTV Steel Hazelwood site in southeast Pittsburgh. (Megan Harris/WESA)

The mill shut down in the late 1990s, and in 2002, was bought by RIDC and a group of local foundations — including the Heinz Endowments and Richard King Mellon Foundation — intent on reclaiming the land for the city and community. They’ve remediated the land, renamed the site “Almono,” after Pittsburgh’s three rivers (Allegheny, Monogahela, Ohio), and are in the process of installing key infrastructure, like water and sewer lines, utilities, and a road.

Source: From red-hot steel to red-hot tech: reinventing an old industrial site — NewsWorks

Habitat For Humanity withdraws from observatory deconstruction project – Mission City Record

“I myself am heartbroken that this observatory is being taken down. We did not realize that some people would be upset with us trying to help recycle some of the material instead of it just being disposed of. We only are allowed to use new material for our builds, we sell recycled material at our ReStores to help us build affordable housing. “To set the record straight we have been working on affordable housing with the city for over a year. Due to the concerns put forward we will withdraw our service of helping to recycle the material when it is disposed of.”

Source: Habitat For Humanity withdraws from observatory deconstruction project – Mission City Record

Column: Deconstruction beats demolition

We could easily imagine a Revive Pontiac program graduate one day purchasing a condemned house, deconstructing it, turning the reclaimed material into a hot product, and then pitching their new business on “Shark Tank.”Deconstruction — demolition’s smarter cousin — is now alive and well in Oakland County and throughout the region, which is good for individuals, neighborhoods, property values, and our economic prosperity.

Source: Column: Deconstruction beats demolition

Two Shoe BBQ, Seattle – Best Reclaimed Interior

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Reclaimed wood interior and amazing chainsaw chandelier.

20 plus years of experience working in other BBQ restaurants followed by 3 years of testing our own recipes and rubs out of our Airstream trailer food truck has brought us here. All of our meats come from sustainable farms in Washington and Oregon that pride themselves on organic, hormone free, pasture raised, free range, well taken care of animals!

Source: About Us – Two Shoe BBQ

Detroit group that salvages homes is recovering after fire | The Merced Sun-Star

FILE - In a Feb. 28, 2013 file photo, workers at Reclaim Detroit salvage wood that was taken from abandon homes in the city and making them useful for other projects, in Detroit. Reclaim Detroit, that gives new life to wood, doors and antique fixtures salvaged from deserted homes is getting its own revival. With no strings attached, Reclaim Detroit said it has received a $100,000 grant after a fire destroyed a workshop, tools and wood saved from more than 100 houses. (Mandi Wright/Detroit Free Press via AP) DETROIT NEWS OUT; MAGS OUT; NO SALES /Detroit Free Press via AP) DETROIT NEWS OUT; TV OUT; MAGS OUT; NO SALES; MANDATORY CREDIT DETROIT FREE PRESS

FILE – In a Feb. 28, 2013 file photo, workers at Reclaim Detroit salvage wood that was taken from abandon homes in the city and making them useful for other projects, in Detroit. Reclaim Detroit, that gives new life to wood, doors and antique fixtures salvaged from deserted homes is getting its own revival. With no strings attached, Reclaim Detroit said it has received a $100,000 grant after a fire destroyed a workshop, tools and wood saved from more than 100 houses. (Mandi Wright/Detroit Free Press via AP)

Read more here: http://www.mercedsunstar.com/news/business/article87468137.html#storylink=cpy

Reclaim Detroit operated at a large warehouse in Highland Park that was destroyed by fire in February. It hopes to open a new mill shop this summer, thanks to Open Road, which provided the largest grant. “Our ability to earn money was imperiled by the fire. … We lost a lot of antique doors and handles. We lost all of the circular saws, ladders, pickaxes. You name it, we lost it,” Dundon said. “Insurance didn’t cover all the losses. It’s extremely difficult for the insurance market to value salvage materials.”

Source: Detroit group that salvages homes is recovering after fire | The Merced Sun-Star

Newman grads practice the three R’s: reclaim, repurpose, reinvent | SaukValley.com

Austin Ryan (left) and Austin Sensenig haul out pieces from an old barn for their business, Green River Barn Salvage. (Philip Marruffo/pmarruffo@saukvalley.com)

“We are always in contact with anyone who has an excavator or a backhoe,” said Ryan, who lives in Rock Falls. “We can make dinner tables, benches, bookshelves, bird feeders, bird houses, everything.”

Source: Newman grads practice the three R’s: reclaim, repurpose, reinvent | SaukValley.com

Designer Turns Old Bowling Lanes Into Classic Furniture

He still uses reclaimed wood from shuttered bowling alleys and steel from old industrial buildings that are being torn down, continuing to live up to CounterEvolution’s mission statement:

To design, build, and sell quality products that realize the highest potential of reclaimed materials with the ultimate goal of bringing functional art, thoughtfully designed and meticulously crafted, into your home or business.

Source: Designer Turns Old Bowling Lanes Into Classic Furniture

Portland City Council to discuss deconstruction requirements | OregonLive.com

This Eastmoreland house was torn down last fall to make way for new construction. Mike Francis | The Oregonian/OregonLive

Already, though, some say the new rule isn’t enough. A group called United Neighborhoods for Reform wants the City Council to require deconstruction for all homes built before 1978 — when the government banned lead paint in consumer uses.

“When a house is demolished through mechanical demolition, lead is pulverized and sent up into the air and falls into neighbors’ yards as dust,” said Barbara Kerr, the group’s representative on the city’s Deconstruction Advisory Group. “If it’s deconstructed, it poses little danger.”

Source: Portland City Council to discuss deconstruction requirements | OregonLive.com

More on what’s wrong with shipping container architecture: Everything. : TreeHugger

© studio bauhaus, ryuji inoue via designboom

It is all very odd. You wouldn’t build a kindergarten out of old shipping containers, since they are covered in the most toxic of paints designed to last years on the ocean. You wouldn’t take new shipping containers because any argument about environmental responsibility is out the window; there is far more steel in them than is actually needed.

Source: More on what’s wrong with shipping container architecture: Everything. : TreeHugger

Revive Pontiac teaches job skills, harvests vintage building materials

Brandon Shirlee of Pontiac works on the interior of a long-vacant building on West Huron near the former Pontiac Central High School. Shirlee is one of 10 workers who are learning job skills while harvesting wood, tile and more from aging buildings to sell in the vintage building materials market. Anne Runkle — The Oakland Press

“You can’t buy 100-year-old oak anymore,” said Ron Borngesser, OLHSA chief executive officer, as he explained the value of harvesting materials from the building, which dates to 1920. It has been vacant for about three decades and had recently been home to squatters, he said. OLHSA is working in cooperation with Architectural Salvage Warehouse of Detroit, a nonprofit organization that promotes the environmental advantages of diverting reusable building materials from landfills, as well as the job training benefits.

Source: Revive Pontiac teaches job skills, harvests vintage building materials

Portland Moves Forward With Demolition Ban For Old Homes . News | OPB

Squatters protest the demolition of a home in Southeast Portland. Amelia Templeton/OPB

“This will allow residents to acquire quality used building materials such as old growth lumber and some of the pieces of Portland history that otherwise would have been discarded into the landfill,” said Zach Klonoski, a sustainability advisor to the mayor.

Source: Portland Moves Forward With Demolition Ban For Old Homes . News | OPB

Concerns and Questions Mount Over Demolition Appeal Process | The Portland Chronicle

“It’s possible to have a neighborhood under this section of code with very few financial resources, and then we have a case here where there’s a neighborhood with a significant amount of resources and we get an entirely different result,” he said. “From a diversity, from a fairness, from a just general perception of government I think, that raises the possibility of having different decisions based solely on economics.”

Source: Concerns and Questions Mount Over Demolition Appeal Process | The Portland Chronicle

Iowa father, daughter who share passion for refurbishing will be at Junkstock – Omaha.com: Living

ANDERA PHOTOGRAPHY
Dawn Backers and dad, Dan Klimesh, own NEI Architectural Salvage & Skräp Work. The duo will be at Junkstock this weekend.

“He has taught me everything from the different woods and architectural elements we salvage to using the tools in the shop,” she said. “It’s been an exciting adventure and I feel like I am always learning something new. Dad is always supporting me in my ideas and dreams of what I can create next.”

Source: Iowa father, daughter who share passion for refurbishing will be at Junkstock – Omaha.com: Living

Crews begin demolishing North Portland home that may date to 1870s | KATU

Crews began demolishing this home at 9134 N. Edison in Portland on Monday. (KATU Photo)

“They built this house, but this house was down on the river,” said Tanya March, who claims to know the home’s history. “We know it was moved up the hill in 1904.” The home had been added to over the years, perhaps hiding any historical uniqueness.

Source: Crews begin demolishing North Portland home that may date to 1870s | KATU

A Surprising Fact About Medieval Europeans: They Recycled | Atlas Obscura

Two leaves from The Mirror of Human Salvation. These pages were reused as a wrapper for a book at some later time. The ghosting of the book it adorned can still be seen in the dark, abraded portion that spans the two pages. (Image: The Walters Art Museum/CC-0)

According to Fleming, the British raided Roman ruins for building materials  to the extent that until the 11th century, Christian churches in Britain were constructed mostly from scavenged Roman materials. This assertion has been verified through architectural surveys, one of which discovered over 300 churches around London built from Roman ruins. Similarly, tile, ceramics, pottery, and iron were all reclaimed and repurposed.

Source: A Surprising Fact About Medieval Europeans: They Recycled | Atlas Obscura

Texans rethink acceptance of tiny house movement growing in Spur, TX | Inhabitat

In a bid to reverse the long population decline, Spur began marketing its relaxed building codes, low land prices, and access to ultra-high-speed fiber Internet to tiny house pioneers. While the plan to turn the town into a tiny house mecca appears to have worked—over 60 lots have been sold for around $500 a piece, and 40 more lots are being freed up for sale—talks of plans for yurts, off-grid dwellings, and underground earth homes unnerved some locals.

Source: Texans rethink acceptance of tiny house movement growing in Spur, TX | Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Shelter, footwear, composting and packaging designs get cradle-to-cradle recognition

The Huba self-sufficient compact mountain shelter, designed by Malgorzata Blachnicka and Michal Holcer, won the Best Use of Aluminum category. It was chosen for its good design, functional use of sustainable materials and its potential use in other housing contexts (such as disaster recovery).

“We launched the Cradle to Cradle Product Design Challenge to help the global design community approach the issue of limited global resources as an opportunity for product innovation,” says president of the Cradle to Cradle Products Institute Lewis Perkins. “Designers have a pivotal role to play in driving long-term solutions that circumvent the concept of waste in favor of materials that can remain in a perpetual cycle of use and reuse.”

Source: Shelter, footwear, composting and packaging designs get cradle-to-cradle recognition

A Haven for New York Relics Saved From the Trash Heap. In Connecticut. – The New York Times

Evan Blum, 59, has filled a complex of buildings in Ivoryton, Conn., with architectural artifacts, many of them recovered from New York City buildings. Credit Christopher Capozziello for The New York Times.

Mr. Blum has been filling the buildings over the past few years with newly rescued items as well as overflow from an inventory acquired over the decades. Inside is a sea of ornamental fixtures and furnishings that have been pulled from buildings being demolished or renovated — and most of it is for sale.

Source: A Haven for New York Relics Saved From the Trash Heap. In Connecticut. – The New York Times

How one man is making a career out of foraging old Maine wood — Homestead — Bangor Daily News — BDN Maine

Ryan Deane

No board was purchased at a big-box lumber yard. Each was curated, piece by piece, from barns on their last legs, farmsteads on the edge of collapse and historic town structures minutes from the wrecking ball. The past is etched into each scuff and splinter.

Source: How one man is making a career out of foraging old Maine wood — Homestead — Bangor Daily News — BDN Maine

ReHistoric Wood sees third year of increased sales > Spokane Journal of Business

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Bruce Johnson, co-owner of ReHistoric Wood Products LLC, says a majority of the company’s inventory comes from old barns, mills, sheds, and small outbuildings. -—LeAnn Bjerken

“The market for reclaimed wood is only getting larger,” says Johnson. “In the last three years, we’ve tripled our sales volume.” ReHistoric Wood Products finds and purchases older wooden buildings that are no longer in use, dismantles them, and sells the pieces for use in other projects. “Sourcing is a very important part of our business,” says Johnson. “The majority of the wood we use comes from old barns, mills, sheds, or smaller outbuildings.”

Source: ReHistoric Wood sees third year of increased sales > Spokane Journal of Business

Video: A 95-Year-Old Bungalow Gets Moved From Hollywood To Los Feliz In The Middle Of The Night: LAist

(Photo courtesy of Andrew Raitt)

The developers, who were looking to build an apartment complex, had purchased the two homes next door and were dead-set on getting the Raitts to sell. At first, Andrew and Christine were uninterested. They had a new baby. They loved their place. The 1,400-square-foot bungalow was home. But, as Andrew said, “[the developer] just kept bugging us and bugging us and bugging us.” They weren’t particularly interested in selling, until the persistent developer came back with an offer that “would make a lot of sense for us, you know, change our life,” as Andrew put it. Still, the Raitts “were just so emotionally attached to the house.” Finally, Andrew said, they told the developer they would sell under one condition: if they could keep the house.

Source: Video: A 95-Year-Old Bungalow Gets Moved From Hollywood To Los Feliz In The Middle Of The Night: LAist

Google Is Moving Into The Spruce Goose’s Massive Hangar: LAist

The hangar that used to house the Spruce Goose (Photo by Mike Hume via the LAist Featured Photos pool on Flickr)

The hangar is massive, with an area of 319,000-square-feet. It had to be huge because The Spruce Goose had eight propeller engines and a wingspan longer than a football field, according to The History Channel. Google is expected to use the hangar as an expansion of its L.A. offices. There is no word about a move-in date, or what the company will do with the adjacent land it purchased in 2014.

Source: Google Is Moving Into The Spruce Goose’s Massive Hangar: LAist

BMRA News June 2016

On October 31 of this year Portland plans to implement a policy requiring deconstruction on any demolition of a house or duplex which was built in 1916 or earlier.  Pre-1917 houses currently account for approximately one-third of the 300+ demolitions taking place in the city each year.

A number of BMRA members have been involved with the effort to develop, pass and implement a deconstruction ordinance in Portland.  BMRA member Sara Badiali, of the Reclamation Administration and also a member of the City of Portland Deconstruction Advisory Group touts the pioneering aspect of this effort:

“The City of Portland, Oregon’s Deconstruction Ordinance is unique as the very first in the world to lawfully require dismantling buildings for reuse. Its historical precedence lays the foundation for other laws to be created to close the loop in our building material waste streams. I am honored to be on the team that created the Deconstruction Ordinance and I am thrilled for the future of the planet.”

Source: BMRA News June 2016

Excess Dale Forest Service buildings to be sold for salvage – Local News –

 

The Umatilla National Forest will begin accepting bids June 10 through June 30 for the removal of 10 single-family or duplex homes, one garage and one office outbuilding, according to a Forest Service press release.

These 12 buildings constitute Phase One of the process to sell or transfer the 25 buildings located at the Dale Administrative Site. This site once served as headquarters for the Dale Ranger District. In 1984, the Dale Ranger District combined with the Ukiah Ranger District to form the North Fork John Day Ranger District.

 Additional information including pictures, building descriptions, bid forms, disclosure notices and removal instructions is available at any Umatilla National Forest Office or on the forest website at fs.usda.gov/umatilla.

Source: Excess Dale Forest Service buildings to be sold for salvage – Local News –

Turkish Pavilion houses a huge ship made from 4 tons of reused materials and discarded furniture | Inhabitat 

The large ship measures 30 meters (98 feet) and weighs four tons. It was built from more than 500 pieces of reused materials, including seven kilometers (4.6 miles) of steel cable, wooden moulds, discarded furniture, signboards and boats found on site.

A large vessel called “a baştarda” built from waste materials in Istanbul was transported to Venice and installed at the pavilion as a symbol of cultural connections and transformation of borders.

Source: Turkish Pavilion houses a huge ship made from 4 tons of reused materials and discarded furniture | Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Upcycling movement inspires local businesses in Sudbury – Sudbury – CBC News

David Kelvin and his fiancee Keshia Brushett are owners of Urban Designs, a company that uses old and unwanted wood to make custom-made furniture. (Samantha Lui/CBC )

“A lot of people are just interested in what we do and what we’re going to do with the wood,” he said. “There’s a lot of people who want their barns down and they don’t have the money or time to take care of it. For them, it’s a favour. We get something out of it and they get something out of it.”

Source: Upcycling movement inspires local businesses in Sudbury – Sudbury – CBC News

Event: ReUse-apalooza

ReUse-apalooza – Photo: Provided

This sustainable soirée brings customers, designers and local leaders together to celebrate the power of renewability. Featuring light bites, My Nose Turns Red circus performers and entertainment by Sexy Time Live Band Karaoke, ReUse-apalooza is the annual fundraiser of Building Value, a nonprofit that salvages reusable building materials for public sale.

Source: Event: ReUse-apalooza

Farmer finds fit with salvage business

Wood Salvage

Aaron Williams stores reclaimed barnwood for his business, Willow Architectural Salvage. He says for every one barn where the wood is salvaged, another 100 are burned or bulldozed. Photos courtesy Aaron Williams.

He has been growing the Willow Architectural Salvage business ever since. “It still allows me to farm,” says Williams, who grows corn and soybeans near Waverly about 30 miles south of Springfield. “Being a farmer, I understand farm families. It’s a good fit,” he says of the business. HOWEVER, DESPITE the popularity of barn wood today, a surprising amount of barns are wasted. “For every one that we salvage about 100 get burned or bulldozed,” Williams says. Some of those barns were built 150 years ago for livestock and when equipment was smaller. Such buildings are expensive to maintain.

Source: Farmer finds fit with salvage business

Green Building: Why Waste a Window? — Environmental Protection

Introduced more than30 years ago, window film today is engineered using advanced technology to deliver energy savings similar to low-e windows, yet at a fraction of what replacement windows cost. Just like new windows and doors, window film is rated by the NFRC (National Fenestration Rating Council), so homeowners and property managers can be sure of the benefits. For single-family homes, window film installation costs can range from $4 to $11 per square foot, depending on the location and type of window film installed, and the process can be completed in one or two days, without a major disruption in use of the rooms where the windows are located.

Source: Green Building: Why Waste a Window? — Environmental Protection

WEF Report Outlines 30 Steps to a Circular Construction Industry | Sustainable Brands

Image credit: Till Krech/Wikimedia Commons

The WEF claims that less than a third of all construction and demolition waste is recovered and reused, resulting in billions of tonnes of materials being wasted. In the United States, about 40 percent of solid waste derives from construction and demolition.“Such waste involves a significant loss of valuable minerals, metals and organic materials,” wrote the WEF’s Keith Beene. “With such quantities involved, even small improvements in the way the construction industry works will have significant impacts on sustainability.”

Source: WEF Report Outlines 30 Steps to a Circular Construction Industry | Sustainable Brands

Massachusetts student Sarah Hastings has been told home is illegal | Daily Mail Online

Sarah Hastings has been living in her 190-square-foot home on wheels, dubbed Rhizhome, on a parcel owned by another couple for the last year.

‘Through my interdisciplinary education at Mount Holyoke College, I brainstormed a way to do this; by graduation I had competed the design and construction of my own mobile tiny home and received high honors in Architectural Studies for my work.  ‘I sourced all of my material from salvage yards, craigslist, and local businesses within a 200 mile radius of my building site.  ‘Local professionals, friends, and my father contributed their skills and knowledge to my project, which ensured a safe and informed home.’

Sarah Hastings (pictured) was given a day to move out. She says she’ll try to find another location for her house

Source: Massachusetts student Sarah Hastings has been told home is illegal | Daily Mail Online

Determined carpenter uses salvaged materials to build his Craftsman home (photos) | OregonLive.com

Carpenter Brian Skinner of Washougal, Washington, took 14 years to build a Craftsman-style house from salvaged wood, stained glass and other elements from the 1900s or earlier. Janet Eastman/The Oregonian

“I love the dignity of clear, vertical grain Doug fir and cedar. It’s quiet,” he says. “You put a varnish on it and it looks like it was dipped in honey.” Skinner, a second-generation carpenter, could have created a museum to display the architectural pieces he rescued from grand residences that were being torn down in the 1960s and 1970s. Instead, he saved the pieces and decades later, built a home for himself.

Source: Determined carpenter uses salvaged materials to build his Craftsman home (photos) | OregonLive.com

Akron Ohio News – Deconstruction program building up community

A home in the 500 block of Euclid Avenue slated for demolition, located adjacent to the Akron Zoo, was one of Habitat for Humanity of Summit County’s recent deconstruction projects, shown above. Staff of the nonprofit removed and recycled aluminum siding, gutters and downspouts, with proceeds to be reinvested in the community.

The current program has Habitat going into houses and other buildings before another contractor demolishes them, so that cabinets, doors, vanities, countertops, light fixtures, windows and other items can be removed. Some items are then sold at the ReStore. Other materials such as furnaces, hot water tanks, aluminum siding, gutters, downspouts, aluminum windows, window frames and copper pipes are recycled for scrap, said Sibbio.

Source: Akron Ohio News – Deconstruction program building up community