How local real estate developers are giving new life to some of Detroit’s shuttered schools

The Leland Lofts, formerly the Nellie Leland School for the Blind

The Leland Lofts, formerly the Nellie Leland School for the Blind

Many of Detroit’s schools are structures worthy of redevelopment, irrespective of preservationist concerns. “They really are brilliantly designed,” says Landy. “These buildings were constructed with reinforced concrete and have a high fire rating. I can turn off the heat in dead of winter it’ll practically stay the same temperature for a week.”

Two-tiered loft living in the Leland Lofts

Two-tiered loft living in the Leland Lofts

via How local real estate developers are giving new life to some of Detroit’s shuttered schools.

Sandy River bridge could be part of Delaware mill town rebirth: Portland City Hall Roundup | OregonLive.com

Rather than building new bridges, Chesser said the idea is to “adopt” old ones. “As we’re trying to create this antique aesthetic and have this very vintage mill town feel, we also thought the idea of having these old bridges, not only is this the right thing to do, it adds something.” Chesser said the state wants to build a tourist attraction, complete with historical signage telling the story of the mill and the area.

via Sandy River bridge could be part of Delaware mill town rebirth: Portland City Hall Roundup | OregonLive.com.

Internships are a reason to fund The Reclamation Administration

Michaela Harms

Micheala: Summer 2014 Intern Extraordinaire

Michaela is a student at Metropolia University in Helsinki, Finland studying sustainable building engineering. Her interest in innovative building was sparked with an initial project in the Mojave Desert at Aquarius Ranch on a super adobe dome underneath UFOs and starry skies.

She stumbled into the natural building world through working on organic farms and continued on with projects utilizing cob, light-clay straw, adobe, and infinite recycled materials. After working at cafes and arts non-profits to support her wanderlust, she chose to return to the Nordic region to get back to her building passion.

This summer she was on work placement with Whole Trees Architecture in her native Wisconsin with one of her architectural heroes, Roald Gundersen. In the future she hopes to creatively develop accessible hybridized building techniques. She believes natural materials, inspiring integrated design, cradle-to-cradle material reuse, and updated vernacular architecture are the future for a sustainable built environment.

When she’s not brainstorming building compositions and calculating structural integrity you’ll find her biking aimlessly, foraging in the forests, enjoying beers at a sauna evening and flipping around with her acrobatics group.

Micheala researched and wrote many articles while interning at The Reclamation Administration.

 

Here are a couple:

Fund The RA!

Weatherford Farmhouse featured on Salvage Dawgs – YourGV.com: Local News

Salvage DawgsSalvage Dawgs airs nationally on DIY Network, and will feature The Weatherford Farmhouse on the eleventh episode of the third season on Dec. 21 at 10 p.m.

He spoke of the 30-member crew spending money at local hotels and restaurants. The crew enjoyed local catering on site, and they even treated Wimbish and his wife to dinner at Bistro 1888.

“That part was interesting-how much impact it makes. They did business with local businesses, not chain stores,” he added.

via Weatherford Farmhouse featured on Salvage Dawgs – YourGV.com: Local News.

Deconstruction, not demolition, is the way to go – The Park Record

This home on Lucky John Drive was recently deconstructed by The ReUse People, a California nonprofit that has recently expanded into Utah, whichThis home on Lucky John Drive was recently deconstructed by The ReUse People, a California nonprofit that has recently expanded into Utah, which transported the salvaged materials to Recycle Utah. We had people standing in line waiting for the next pallet to be taken off the truck, said Recycle Utah Executive Director Insa Riepen. (Courtesy of Recycle Utah)

Sustainability is an increasingly important global issue and building demolitions and renovations appear to be an overlooked area of focus. When The ReUse People get a demolition project, they don’t rip everything out, load it into dumpsters and take it to a landfill — they take the building apart a little more carefully and save all the materials that can be salvaged — about 90 percent of a typical home.

via Deconstruction, not demolition, is the way to go – The Park Record.

The Reclamation Administration Evolution | Indiegogo

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The Reclamation Administration  Contribute Here!

Since 2011 the RA has been a primary site for news and research on building material waste prevention. Posts on projects, programs, policy, people and the amazing progress made in reclaiming beautiful materials from going to waste!

  • Over 3,000 links to inspiring stories, collaboration, and design
  • Resource pages on reuse centers, regional policy, reuse design links
  • Original content articles, featured artists, announcements, and internships

The building material reuse community is a thriving growing industry of professionals and policy-makers who are changing the world for the better! The Reclamation Administration is uniting this diverse community through daily news.

The Reclamation Administration Needs to Increase Capacity!

This free site needs capital to evolve. We need $5,000 for:

  • Publication of our First Book on reclaimed designs by the talented craftspeople featured over the years
  • New Logo and Marketing campaign to reach more readers
  • Additional supply & demand Resource Pages to connect people to materials
  • To become a Limited Liability Corporation: The Reclamation Administration, LLC

If the funding goal isn’t reached, The Reclamation Administration will continue to provide these services but at a much slower pace. There is a high demand for inspirational news on reclaimed building materials – and we want to answer the call!

The Impact

The RA is an ongoing source of inspiration for design, policy, collaboration, business, environmental issues, job creation, and education.  The RA features daily information highlighting the “Triple Bottom Line” model of sustainability.  The RA provides daily news that People, Planet, and Profit are synergistic when reclaiming building materials.

  • Social change in the form of job creation, and the establishment of Deconstruction as a Trade Skill
  •  Environmental and ecological impact through reducing the waste stream and limiting the need for consuming raw materials
  •  Financial profit from creating a new industry in harvesting and producing products from reclaimed building materials

Over 100,000 people have visited the RA since it’s creation with an average of 100 new visitors a day. Over 400 readers are dedicated followers.

Risks & Challenges

The RA has been operating as a blog for over three years.  The new funds will go to registering The Reclamation Administration as a LLC. The RA is a Social Entrepreneurship – a business with a mission and we have a lot more to learn!

Here’s what we have so far:

  • Over three years of support in consistent & reliable information on building material reuse
  • Partnerships with national organizations, businesses, craftspeople, and government
  • Small business graduate through Mercy Corps North West

Other Ways You Can Help

If you can’t contribute financially send us your news instead!  We are always looking to spread the word and hear people’s stories on reuse. Send our campaign to someone you know, take a moment to pass it on – thank you.

  • Get the word out about The Reclamation Administration
  • Use the Indiegogo share tools!

via The Reclamation Administration Evolution | Indiegogo.

‘Spolia’ event examines history, future of reuse | Cornell Chronicle

The practice dates “back to ancient Egypt and perhaps beyond,” Mergold says. “It’s extremely pragmatic and symbolically charged. More than recycling, spolia also has social, cultural and even political dimensions. We think of it as an archaic practice, yet we also think that we have just invented recycling, life hacking and adaptive reuse. In fact, it has been practiced for millennia.”

via ‘Spolia’ event examines history, future of reuse | Cornell Chronicle.

Demolition planning as part of construction – reuse and recycling of parts improves the eco-efficiency of buildings

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland studied the reuse of structural elements in the ReUSE (Repetitive Utilization of Structural Elements) project, which recently ended. VTT also proposes the development requirements for improving the planning linked with demolition and repair. Of these, the most pivotal are the development of the guidelines and legislation supporting reuse, in addition to showing, by means of example targets, the commercial and ecological benefits that can be obtained.

via Demolition planning as part of construction – reuse and recycling of parts improves the eco-efficiency of buildings.

Rosemary District rising | HeraldTribune.com

STAFF PHOTO / MIKE LANG Edward and Lesa Stroop are co-owners of Architectural Revival. Their son, Taylor Stroop, right, is a furniture designer. They plan to open a showroom on Central Avenue in the Rosemary District.

The store will feature reclaimed and repurposed furniture, though it also will sell new and vintage pieces. The Stroops pride themselves on finding one-of-kind items. For example, Architectural Revival will sell some teak wood furniture built with wood repurposed from Indonesian fishing boats.

via Rosemary District rising | HeraldTribune.com.

The sound of American Crayon | Sandusky Register

Provided photo / Ben Baker plays a “canjo,” or a banjo made with a can resonator. He created the canjo from salvaged pieces of materials from the American Crayon factory.

Maple hardwood floorboards found inside American Crayon — some 100 years older or more — make great necks for string instruments, including guitars, Baker said.

So far, Baker has salvaged some of the hardwood for guitar necks. Meanwhile, he also repurposed some of the factory’s supporting beams into guitar bodies and custom ukeleles as well.

via The sound of American Crayon | Sandusky Register.

Waste not by giving stained glass windows a new life | Pacific NW | The Seattle Times

A stained-glass window is one of two pairs remaining from a 1904 house.

Earthwise got the windows when a South Park man decided to rent out his home after living there for 25 years, according to Earthwise director Kadence Englehardt. Rather than risk the windows being broken by renters, the man brought them to the salvage shop to ensure their safety.

via Waste not by giving stained glass windows a new life | Pacific NW | The Seattle Times.

Alberta history preserved by salvaging antique wood for home renos

Alberta history preserved by salvaging antique wood for home renos

Michael Gerrand from Salvage Solutions, a company in Pincher Creek, Alberta that tears down old barns, then sells the wood and extras for flooring, doors and furniture. Photograph by: Greg Southam , Edmonton Journal

“It adds a soul to a house,” Gerrand said of the antique wood additions. “All I see from my drive up from Pincher Creek to Edmonton is thousands of soulless houses and I think that there’s a market to putting a little bit of soul into some of these places and a little bit of history. I think people want it.

“I think Albertans, just like they want to know where their food comes from nowadays, I think they’d be pretty interested to know where some of their building materials came from.”

via Alberta history preserved by salvaging antique wood for home renos.

The_Valley_Reporter – Vermont Land Trust removes Tenney house for reuse and farm’s renewal

Deconstruction Works crew and Liza Walker, Mad River Valley director for Vermont Land Trust, in front of Tenney farmhouse on Marble Hill in Fayston. Photo: John Atkinson

In an effort to revitalize the Tenney property on Marble Hill Road in Fayston as a working farm and forest in the Mad River Valley, Vermont Land Trust has contracted with Deconstruction Works to remove one of two farmhouses located on the property. Deconstruction Works is a team of deconstructionists specializing in the salvage and repurposing of the built environment. The team will carefully dismantle, salvage and repurpose components of the red farmhouse located at the top of Marble Hill Road. This undertaking is driven by the significant disrepair of the building and the financial burden that would be transferred to the next farm owner if it were left on the site.

via The_Valley_Reporter – Vermont Land Trust removes Tenney house for reuse and farm’s renewal.

Tour the Coolest Converted Grain-Bin Dwelling on the Prairie – Adaptive Reuse – Curbed National

grain3.jpgPhoto via Collaborative Design Architects via Houzz

The original bin, which measures 36 feet in diameter and 20 feet in height, has stayed largely intact; inside it, the primary living space is enclosed in a 900-square-foot insulated box. There are, however, stairs that lead to the unfinished space below, which Morris currently uses as an art studio.

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via Tour the Coolest Converted Grain-Bin Dwelling on the Prairie – Adaptive Reuse – Curbed National.

Forest City Brewery embraces history as it sets to open in Cleveland | cleveland.com

The 1915 building once was a former tavern house, appropriate for its latest incarnation. Construction will include reclaimed wood from a nearby home that dates to the 1880s. The part of the building that will house the brewery has a barn-like look to it, with high wooden strips forming the rafters. And in a neat homage to the past, bricks were salvaged from a former Forest City Brewery.

via Forest City Brewery embraces history as it sets to open in Cleveland | cleveland.com.

Desso upcycles 20,000 tonnes of chalk from water companies in new Cradle to Cradle initiative

Desso is collaborating with Reststoffenunie, an association of drinking water companies in the Netherlands, to upcycle re-engineered calcium carbonate (chalk) from local drinking water companies such as Brabant Water and WML (Water Maatschappij Limburg). The chalk is positively defined in accordance with C2C criteria and is used for the production of Desso’s carpet tiles with EcoBase backing, which is C2C Silver certified and 100% recyclable in Desso’s own production process.

via Desso upcycles 20,000 tonnes of chalk from water companies in new Cradle to Cradle initiative.

Nonprofit and Mt. Airy salvage company unite to sustainably reduce Germantown blight — NewsWorks

Philadelphia Community Corps is providing first-phase deconstruction of nine vacant homes in Germantown-Logan, just outside the main entrance of La Salle University. (Emily Brooks/for NewsWorks)Philadelphia Community Corps is providing first-phase deconstruction of nine vacant homes in Germantown-Logan, just outside the main entrance of La Salle University. (Emily Brooks/for NewsWorks)

“Chris immediately saw the potential,” Trainor said. “Philadelphia Community Corps needs an experienced for-profit partner to break through the barriers to entry into the structure removal industry, and Philadelphia Salvage Company needs a reliable supply of reclaimed building materials.”

They immediately got to work seeking opportunities, and through the collaboration PCC was awarded their first contract — to provide first-phase deconstruction of nine vacant homes in the Germantown-Logan section of Philadelphia, just outside the main entrance of La Salle University.

via Nonprofit and Mt. Airy salvage company unite to sustainably reduce Germantown blight — NewsWorks.

Australian Man Builds Tiny, Solar-Powered Retreat Using Almost 100% Recycled Materials | Inhabitat

Australian builder James Galletly, also known as The Upcyclist, teamed up with the Bower Reuse and Repair Center to design and build The Tiny, a small and cozy retreat constructed atop a box trailer and assembled with more than 95% recycled materials.

via Australian Man Builds Tiny, Solar-Powered Retreat Using Almost 100% Recycled Materials | Inhabitat – Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building.

Inspiration for Emily & Aaron’s Condo Renovation — Renovation Diary | Apartment Therapy

Love the industrial feel of the reclaim wood against the subway tiles. Eat Drink Americano, Los Angeles (photo from Dustjacket Attic).

I am also very drawn to the industrial interiors of the gastropubs and retail stores that are popping up all over downtown LA. Reclaimed wood, wrought iron, subway tiles with dark grout, concrete, pre rinse faucets, and vintage filament light bulbs are characteristic of this style.

via Inspiration for Emily & Aaron’s Condo Renovation — Renovation Diary | Apartment Therapy.

Connaught bricks to be salvaged from Regina dump – Saskatchewan – CBC News

A salvage effort is set to recover some bricks as souvenirs from Connaught School in Regina.A salvage effort is set to recover some bricks as souvenirs from Connaught School in Regina. (CBC)

According to Elliot, some of the material includes decorative limestone and terrazzo pieces along with intact bricks.

Elliot said she learned that the bricks were destined to be crushed.

“Some of it may be used for roadways,” she said. “But … it sounded like they were just pulverizing it into the landfill itself.”

via Connaught bricks to be salvaged from Regina dump – Saskatchewan – CBC News.

Barn whisperer: Rigaud man gives centuries’ old wood new vocations | Montreal Gazette

Roger Brabant of Rigaud relaxes inside a disassembled barn as he works to reclaim some of the wooden beams and planks Monday, October 27, 2014. Roger Brabant of Rigaud relaxes inside a disassembled barn as he works to reclaim some of the wooden beams and planks Monday, October 27, 2014.

Known in the area as Roger “Barnwood” Brabant, he has spent the last 20 years dismantling old barns from local farms, recuperating the aged wood they’re made of and either selling it as is or turning it into furniture. Montreal café and bar owners, especially Irish pubs, have become popular clientele, condo owners and designers as well.

via Barn whisperer: Rigaud man gives centuries’ old wood new vocations | Montreal Gazette.